Jump to content

KX85 - lowering kit or methods

Recommended Posts

Hi there...

My son has been riding for 6 yrs now and has beat his TTR90 to death. This past weekend, he tried out a KX85 and loves it...but... it sits a little high where he can't touch the ground yet. We put some blocks out for him to work on using the clutch.

Is there a way to lower the bike (linkage?) forks up in triples that drops the bike about 2"? With this, he would be able to start the bike if needed.

The bike belongs to a close friend so I know its history (good) so I can get it for a good price.

Thanks for the advice everyone!

mx813

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hey you can wind the spring down on the rear shock...well technically its compresing the rear spring,you will need the tool to do it which would be available from your local parts dealer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
http://www.koubalink.com/KX80.html

Don't shave the seat unless you really need to. Kids grow and you will need to replace the foam and seat cover in the near future. Links are much easier to replace.

Exactly what I was looking for. That with raising the forks should give me the 1 1/2" my son needs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And remember that there is no 1:1 ratio with rear vs front lowering. A little bit up front either way makes a huge difference once rear lowering and resetting of sag is complete.

Exactly what I was looking for. That with raising the forks should give me the 1 1/2" my son needs.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought my son a 2006 kx85 and it was a little bit too tall for him. I took off the stock links and made some from the same width steel that are about 5/8 of an inch longer than stock. This dropped seat height about 3inches.He can now get both feet on ground. This will work for him until he gets a little taller.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know this is an old thread, but still relevant. I'm lowering my son's kx85 also using the stock parts. I've lowered the front as much as I can, and released the rear spring jam nuts all the way up. Someone previously said that this method compresses the spring. I think it does the opposite. It releases the spring so there is LESS compression, allowing the bike to sag more. Am I crazy, or am I correct? I found that both methods really only lowered the bike about 1" overall. It'll be interesting to see how it performs this weekend. Of course, he's only 70 lbs so it shouldnt be too crazy, but hopefully it's not too spongy.

20180205_233241.jpg

20180205_233318.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shaving the seat is the cheapest way to lower keeping the stock suspension geometry.  Links do lower the rear but in turn allow contact to the fender.  Look on Race Techs website about lowering, I would just echo that.  Shave the seat or do it internally with limiters.

Edited by Jeekinz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/7/2018 at 6:44 AM, chucktownriders said:

It'll be interesting to see how it performs this weekend.

 

Expect less front tire traction and the front end to push in corners.

(don't add anymore learning 'variables' for your son!)

 

The spring preload isn't meant to raise or lower the bike to suit the rider,

as Jeekinz mentioned above, setting the required sag (as per the manual)

assures the bike has it's proper steering geometry and weight balance as designed.

 

For that light of a rider, softer springs to match his weight are a must.

If the bike is still too high, shaving the seat is the first step in order

to avoid suspension mods that will alter the handling and suspension's capability.

Edited by mlatour
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/7/2018 at 5:44 AM, chucktownriders said:

I know this is an old thread, but still relevant. I'm lowering my son's kx85 also using the stock parts. I've lowered the front as much as I can, and released the rear spring jam nuts all the way up. Someone previously said that this method compresses the spring. I think it does the opposite. It releases the spring so there is LESS compression, allowing the bike to sag more. Am I crazy, or am I correct? I found that both methods really only lowered the bike about 1" overall. It'll be interesting to see how it performs this weekend. Of course, he's only 70 lbs so it shouldnt be too crazy, but hopefully it's not too spongy.

20180205_233241.jpg

20180205_233318.jpg

 

By taking all of the preload off of the rear spring, you're setting your kid up to get hurt. 

1. The bike is going to sag too much in the rear and will not handle correctly. It will push in the corners, and I'm not even sure what it will do off the face of a jump. It could blow through the stroke and rebound him over the bars.

2. When the shock is fully extended in the air, the spring will be loose and can cause the spring retainer to come off the bottom of the shock. If that were to happen, it would be like landing with no shock on the bike. With no spring tension there, it would blow through the stroke and slam the frame into the ground. 

As stated, it's best to get the correct spring rate for your kid. You can get lowering links to lower the bike correctly that are pretty cheap. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with everything that has been said, but I wouldn’t worry too much about screwing up the geometry, handling, etc unless your boy is gonna be flying and railing the bike . On my sons KX65 we did homemade links and raised forks as they were simple. We cut the seat and front springs (added spacers) next to get it even lower. Each year we removed one of the mods as he grew. He is now on a KX85 and it looks like our process will be the same. You don’t get much from raising the forks as Kawasaki already did it on the 85 vs the 100.

BTW, this is a great way for both of you to learn/understand suspension. I have done two of my own bikes after playing with his.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×