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top end, no torque wrench?

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so nobody has done one without it?

was hoping to do a top end this weekend, might have to wait til this sht arrives now :<

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yea,ive done it about five times now.blown head gasket everytime. I think I'm onna go get one this time. I'm new to this.

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yea,ive done it about five times now.blown head gasket everytime. I think I'm onna go get one this time. I'm new to this.

can that really be linked to improper torque specs?

id think if it makes the seal, what could be the issue?

i can see under-torquing being a problem with an air leak, but over?

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under torquing obviosly won't compress the gasket properly, over torquing can strip threads break studs and more than likely warp the head and cylinder, also you have a good chance of having 1 side of the head too tight the other too loose and multiple combination of problems

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so nobody has done one without it?

was hoping to do a top end this weekend, might have to wait til this sht arrives now :<

Have done five now without a torque wrench. Make sure you tighten them down again once you break it in. Have noticed that the Cometic gaskets don't bring about need to re-tighten cylinder bolts.

Make damn sure you measure the ring end gap however.

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Have done five now without a torque wrench. Make sure you tighten them down again once you break it in. Have noticed that the Cometic gaskets don't bring about need to re-tighten cylinder bolts.

Make damn sure you measure the ring end gap however.

ya i got a feeler gauge for that def :thumbsup:

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I've done it without at least 5 times with no issue. You can get a feel for how tight is tight with an end wrench. Just make sure to use a criss cross pattern when tightening. no issue.:thumbsup:

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I've done it without at least 5 times with no issue. You can get a feel for how tight is tight with an end wrench. Just make sure to use a criss cross pattern when tightening. no issue.:thumbsup:

def will do

thanks guys

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I did my top end without a torque wrench,no problems now. but If I was to do it again I would get a torque wrench for sure. why guess when you can do it right?

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done 2 most recent yesterday just go steady in a criss cross pattern.

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I don't recommend it but you could do it. Just make sure when you tighten things up to go in a criss cross pattern and tighten each nut about 1/4 - 1/8 turn at a time so that none of them would be tighter than the other.

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I did the jug mounting bolts without a torque wrench, snugged them up tight, then 1/4 turn more on each and nothing leaked etc.

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The manual says GERMAN TORQUE. So "GUDENTITE" in a star pattern will probably be okay. And like said before, retighten after first rides. -BIG DAN:thumbsup:

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You cant easily use a torque wrench on the base bolts so I dont, cross cross and even torque in stages. I used that same method yesterday day on the head nuts because I no longer trust my torque wrench.

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I have a $25 generic torque wrench you can find from most auto stores. I use a crows foot extension to get to the base bolts as well. I calibrate the torque wrench every time I do a top end change. I'm quite sure you can afford $25.

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