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Side hill Single Track off Camber Log Crossings!

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I was wondering if anyone had tips or techniques for crossing logs on side hill single track where the log is laying on the trial at a downhill angle sitting about 6" to a foot off the ground. Log being maybe 18" around. Thanks:worthy:

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my original strategy was to wheelie up onto the log, land on the skidplate, immediately fall to the downhill side, land on my hip on the log, then slide off and have the bike land on me. That seemed like it wasn't the best way, so now I park 10-15' in front of the log, take out my stihl ms250 chainsaw (16" bar) and remove the log. If it's bigger than about 14" diameter, i cut the initials of my buddy VeloSapiens into the end.

Oh, wait, you said 18" around, so that's only like 6" thick? you can usually ride over those if they're not too slippery by just making sure you clear it with your skidplate so the rear tire is the first thing that hits. If you ease off the gas and pull in the clutch right before the rear tire hits, the weight transfers to the front and the rear suspension gets softer and it's more likely to gently roll over instead of stopping and spinning. I do it standing so i can also flex my legs as the rear tire hits and absorb the impact.

It's a bit of a judgement call tho. I ride a fair amount by myself, so if it looks like there is much chance of the skidplate hitting on an angled log I'll get off and drag over.

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If I'm understanding you correctly, there is a steep angle and the long is laying directly across it no onher ngle except downhill?

If so approach slowly maybe 1st gear to start, ride up toward the log and just before the front wheel touches *pop* the clutch bringing the front wheel 3/4 of the way up the face of the log/tree.

You are goining to be tempted to stay in a neutral position, however as soon as that front wheel hits you need to lean in the upward direction of the log, almost steering/counter steering into the climb (space permitting) this way when the rear wheel hits it will not wantto slide the entire length of the obsticale, more follow the front wheel which has now chosen the shortest path.

The other way to do it is as you approach *pop* the clutch that the front wheel hops the trunk and while doing a bunny hop in the upward direction landing on the rear wheel - and using the skide plate as a safe guard, bounce the bike over - this is a very advanced tech. and have seen pros battle with it and come short this includes wattsy.

Either way you choose you have to commit and not get whiskey throttle at any point.

Good luck cause you going to need it.

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my original strategy was to wheelie up onto the log, land on the skidplate, immediately fall to the downhill side, land on my hip on the log, then slide off and have the bike land on me. That seemed like it wasn't the best way, so now I park 10-15' in front of the log, take out my stihl ms250 chainsaw (16" bar) and remove the log. If it's bigger than about 14" diameter, i cut the initials of my buddy VeloSapiens into the end.

Oh, wait, you said 18" around, so that's only like 6" thick? you can usually ride over those if they're not too slippery by just making sure you clear it with your skidplate so the rear tire is the first thing that hits. If you ease off the gas and pull in the clutch right before the rear tire hits, the weight transfers to the front and the rear suspension gets softer and it's more likely to gently roll over instead of stopping and spinning. I do it standing so i can also flex my legs as the rear tire hits and absorb the impact.

It's a bit of a judgement call tho. I ride a fair amount by myself, so if it looks like there is much chance of the skidplate hitting on an angled log I'll get off and drag over.

Yes I did mean 18" thick not around. Sorry for the wording. My general idea or theory has been to approach in 1st gear, pop the front wheel just enough to get wheel bounce off the log, allow skid plate to contact, then rear wheel hits and I slide off the trail.

I agree with the saw theory if I had one. Next on the list for my trail tool kit.:thumbsup:

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Yes I did mean 18" thick not around. Sorry for the wording. My general idea or theory has been to approach in 1st gear, pop the front wheel just enough to get wheel bounce off the log, allow skid plate to contact, then rear wheel hits and I slide off the trail.

I agree with the saw theory if I had one. Next on the list for my trail tool kit.:thumbsup:

ok, so a thick log. I must not be visualizing it correctly, cuz in the scenario i have in mind, where the log is angled, hitting it with the skidplate causes a tipover, since only 1 side of the skidplate will hit. I learned this the hard way. We cross over a huge amount of logs in normal idaho mountain riding. Even tho many of us travel with a chainsaw in the early part of the year, stuff still falls down after the initial clearing. Also (as chadg can vouch) some folks only use the saw for stuff they can't ride over, so they might leave something that you or i can't easily ride over.

In idaho, if you don't pack a chainsaw, you are totally dependent on other people to clear trails for you, and always at risk of getting turned back unless you know someone who has recently been through, and there's been no windy weather since then. There are trails where we have literally cut 100+ logs in 1 day, and left alot of easy ones because we were running out of time.

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Maybe a bit more speed to have some momentum working for you, you need to get past the mental picture of the log as a big obstacle. IT'S NOT THAT BIG!! just calm down, don't think about it and just ride over it.

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Maybe a bit more speed to have some momentum working for you, you need to get past the mental picture of the log as a big obstacle. IT'S NOT THAT BIG!! just calm down, don't think about it and just ride over it.

That's a sure way to get body-slammed (bike-slammed?) into the log. I like the saw idea.:thumbsup:

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The last time i went riding up at Sagehen Reservior up at the top of the mountian , there was a log like you mentioned , though more on the size of what Llama was talking about , and a buddy of mine tried the Fly over it approach , well he had to ride the next 35 miles of our riding without a front brake lever and a really sore arm and side , because the bike did exactly what Llama described , and sent him sideways and over the bars

After i stopped and checked to make sure he was not seriously hurt ,i got back on my bike and i popped my front tire over it and got off the bike and lifted (with the help of the motor and being in gear) the rear of my bike over it , it did try to slide my rear wheel over the edge , but luckly there was a small bush that kept the rear from going over(it is also what the tree had stopped against)

the ones on angles like that are always a challenge , because it can either be fairly easy to get over or it will make the back end slip out or your bike will slide across it and then your out of control and chances of breaking something , including yourself increase !

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Ask ur buddy to help u. Or turn around. I dont like those ones. Over 12" and ur lookin for trouble. Its likely the bike will take off down the hill when u hit the back tire or the skid plate. And the idea that u or myself could drive the front wheel into an obstacle like that and hope for a good outcome, it aint happenin!

Lets talk about something else, Im having flashbacks.:thumbsup:

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Maybe a bit more speed to have some momentum working for you, you need to get past the mental picture of the log as a big obstacle. IT'S NOT THAT BIG!! just calm down, don't think about it and just ride over it.

Should I at least try and wheelie?:thumbsup:

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to get your front tire over or on it , sure ! , but dont expect to just plop over the log without some puckering or some effort and thinking before you commit to anything that could get you hurt

those logs that are off the ground and on a angle , are always a challenge !

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Ask ur buddy to help u. Or turn around. I dont like those ones. Over 12" and ur lookin for trouble. Its likely the bike will take off down the hill when u hit the back tire or the skid plate. And the idea that u or myself could drive the front wheel into an obstacle like that and hope for a good outcome, it aint happenin!

Lets talk about something else, Im having flashbacks.:thumbsup:

Downieville? :ride:

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If I'm understanding you correctly, there is a steep angle and the long is laying directly across it no onher ngle except downhill?

If so approach slowly maybe 1st gear to start, ride up toward the log and just before the front wheel touches *pop* the clutch bringing the front wheel 3/4 of the way up the face of the log/tree.

You are goining to be tempted to stay in a neutral position, however as soon as that front wheel hits you need to lean in the upward direction of the log, almost steering/counter steering into the climb (space permitting) this way when the rear wheel hits it will not wantto slide the entire length of the obsticale, more follow the front wheel which has now chosen the shortest path.

The other way to do it is as you approach *pop* the clutch that the front wheel hops the trunk and while doing a bunny hop in the upward direction landing on the rear wheel - and using the skide plate as a safe guard, bounce the bike over - this is a very advanced tech. and have seen pros battle with it and come short this includes wattsy.

Either way you choose you have to commit and not get whiskey throttle at any point.

Good luck cause you going to need it.

Last sentence makes me:lol:

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Downieville? :thumbsup:

I cant remember. See scenario #2!

The way I see it, one of two things are gonna happen if u or myself try to ride over a big tree lying across the trail at a steep angle like u describe.

1. Wheelie over the tree forcefully bashing the skidplate into the trees awkward angle thus sending bike and rider highsiding down hill. Not a good scenerio, seen it, dont want to do it!

2. Wheelie over tree gently landing skidplate on trees awkward angle, losing all momentum thus sending bike and possibly rider sliding down tree. These trees always seem to have NO BARK on them for any kind of traction. Done this one, I dont like giving or receiving help, so what to do? Either way Im gonna be asking for help so of course I GO FOR IT! Kidding, Id rather swallow my pride and ask for help on this one.

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I cant remember. See scenario #2!

The way I see it, one of two things are gonna happen if u or myself try to ride over a big tree lying across the trail at a steep angle like u describe.

1. Wheelie over the tree forcefully bashing the skidplate into the trees awkward angle thus sending bike and rider highsiding down hill. Not a good scenerio, seen it, dont want to do it!

2. Wheelie over tree gently landing skidplate on trees awkward angle, losing all momentum thus sending bike and possibly rider sliding down tree. These trees always seem to have NO BARK on them for any kind of traction. Done this one, I dont like giving or receiving help, so what to do? Either way Im gonna be asking for help so of course I GO FOR IT! Kidding, Id rather swallow my pride and ask for help on this one.

It seems to be the no bark issue is more relevant than the camber of the tree. So, what if there is bark? Will there really be any more traction to be had? I am still convinced that with the right technique, this can be done. Anyone else have ideas?

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There is a video of a guy doing this. A skilled rider makes it look easy.

Look at about 2:50 and 3:35

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Yes but looks can be deceiving............

Im turning around and if any one of my riding buddies makes it over they can

(1) help me around the freaking log

(2) kiss my lilly white arse

........................Oldskoo11

Edited by OldSkoo11
cause I wanted to

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There is a video of a guy doing this. A skilled rider makes it look easy.

Look at about 2:50 and 3:35

I checked out the vid and the crossings at 2:55 I don't have a problem with. Put those same logs on a 45 degree angle on side hill a half a foot off the ground with twice as narrow of a trail. Those are the ones I am talking about.

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