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Buying used race bike (reliability)

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I haven't bought a race bike, but if they're anything like cars, I'd steer clear.

I bought a bracket racer mustang a few years ago, owner said it was maintained perfectly, oil changes every race etc etc...

... when I picked it up, it barely started, ran on 7 cyl and the timing was waay off due to a worn dist gear. I still bought it, because the parts on it alone were worth it and I could deal with the problems in my shop.

Just inspect the bike very carefully, check for frame damage, check the condition of the various drive components, if you can, try to test drive it to make sure the tranny even shifts still.

Good luck

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Interesting subject. A bike 12 months old, I think definitely you can find bikes in great condition, and at a good price. A four stroke that has been raced for several seasons, starting to enter unknown territory. Obviously overall condition should tell you the condition of the bike pretty much straight away, but being a racer myself and knowing other guys that race, and knowing how much maintenance goes into maintaining a race bike for whole season I would much prefer to by a bike that had been raced and well looked after, than to buy a bike that had been ridden around on a property or used for trail riding. (As you guys call it "woods riding") These bikes seem to get little love and get pretty much ridden into the ground.

:thumbsup:

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I would buy an MX race bike, especially if it is race only. Those things are BABIED. Ridden for maybe 1-1.5 hours a week, and treated nicely afterwards.

Harescramble race bike, not so sure. They get the crap beat outta them, run hard for 2+ hours, in mud.

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I would buy an MX race bike, especially if it is race only. Those things are BABIED. Ridden for maybe 1-1.5 hours a week, and treated nicely afterwards.

Harescramble race bike, not so sure. They get the crap beat outta them, run hard for 2+ hours, in mud.

I could say the same.

All my friends told me that a race bike often looks and run better than a woods-cruiser bike.

A racer doesn't allow himself not to put always the best parts in the bike, regularly service it and change even the less important part on it to a new one, while a young man, who use the bike for scrambling and even if he notice that even if something is getting wrong on the bike, he will keep use it on, and think that part isn't that important.

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I don't know about the parts thing the last guy is talking about unless it's someone who doesn't care of course and either way track or woods the bikes it's going to be beat up. I would say my bike gets X10 more beat up doing scrambles than at the track. Scrambles in the woods tend to get the bike less air and clog things up faster, from my experience.

So to answer your question, take a look at the bike and it's condition. You don't know where the bikes been unless you know the guy. He could have beat the crap out of it and he's telling you it's been babied all it's life and oil changed every 2 hours. If you aren't sure what to look for take another set of eye's with you that does.

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i bought an 03 yz250f last year which was raced it's first season (guy said he burned through 12 tires :thumbsup: ) before being sold to the next owner, who took care of it as well. I got it in 09 and had no problems with it whatsoever. I also know (most) people who do woods riding around their house/ pits etc. dont maintain the bikes as well and like to fly down long dirt roads with the throttle pinned for extended periods of time. I would deff. buy a race bike again especially if it was raced by an intermediate or pro rider.

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