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Do these parts need replacing

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Can you tell if these fork parts are needing replacement or not by this picture?

I believe one is called a fork piston and metal slide. (according to a parts diagram)

100_1049.jpg

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ive seen a lot worse, the copper on the guide bushes still looks pretty good, thats unusual.

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the copper doesnt matter a stuff,

its the teflon that needs checking

hard to tell from the photos,

looks like you have a lot of flash (alloy bits) embeded in one bush and the edge of the teflon doesnt look to clever on the front 2 bushes

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"wrong" - now theres an intelligent answer if I ever saw one!

to answer your question, if you have new bushes put them in

if you dont then get rid of as much of the alloy bits embeded in the teflon as you can and polish the edge of the teflon with some green scotchbright, till it is smooth. Should be good to go!

if you can see any metal through the teflon coating then they are done, replace them.

Edited by EDS
to answer the original question

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I think the point he's making is that the "copper" side of either bushing is not the wearing side. The taller, split bushings fit in grooves on the inner tube, and wear only on the outside. The shorter pair goes in the bottom of the seal pocket in the outer tubes and wears only on the inside, so it's those surfaces that need the inspection.

That said, and I know it's only a picture, but it looks a bit like there's a shadow of the copper base showing through the Teflon on the lower/narrower bushings?

Assemble the tubes with only the bushings in place and check the fit if in doubt. Or just replace them.

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yes you are right, i was feeling lazy and hoped someone would chime in.... the copper part sits inside the tubes yes, if the copper is worn through it means the bush is smaller in od than a new one, that means one thing, its looser, often you see a mark that shows its been rocking in the tube, this one in the pic hasnt, so its not as bad as some i see, if i was ina fix i would be happy to leave this pair once the particles are removed from the teflon, but even thats not a great answer, as you have to really look hard at the teflon, it can be only half worn through (when looked at under a magniifying glass) and then it would show wear, this means it would not be as slick as it should be, most suspension manuals show this and how to check for wear.

So as a rule if its more than 25 hours old IMO its no good, even if it has teflon and copper.

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Thanks guys. Suspension is one aspect where i am veryyy clueless. So replace both to be safe. I can safetly assume the old owner wouldnt have touched these seeing as he was too lazy to replace lost bolts with the proper fitting bolts.

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So as a rule if its more than 25 hours old IMO its no good, even if it has teflon and copper.

25 hours?!

I'm typically the guy to recommend replacing bushings if your doing seals, especially if the bike is more then 2-3 years old.. Especially considering your wasting the time rebuilding them and buying seals/oil, might as well purchase bushings also

but 25 hours?! What's that, a few hours past break in :thumbsup:

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One question when u send forks in to get rebuild. what to the shops really do? Oil, bushings and seals?

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Look at the outer bushing on the right side of the picture - I can see from here (Arizona to Ontario!) that the teflon is worn through!

And "YES", the copper DOES matter! Especially on the outer bushings. The copper is there to protect the inside of the aluminum tube from the steel of the bushing. Once that copper goes away, you lose tolerance in the parts (like Marcus stated) and then the steel starts wearing at the aluminum, making the tolerance worse. In turn, this can cause seals to leak becuase the tubes no longer stay in line. The seal can only go so far until it loses contact with the chrome tube, then you have a leak.

I can't say what all shops do as far as a rebuild, but if I saw those bushings, I'd be calling the customer to let them know they all need to be replaced.

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I can't say what all shops do as far as a rebuild, but if I saw those bushings, I'd be calling the customer to let them know they all need to be replaced.

Yeah I'm not sure what shops do, I'd imagine they would regularly just use the old bushings unless they were obviously worn.

If you are mechanically inclined, forks are very easy to overhaul... I've rebuilt many for lots of friends, takes me easily 1hour once they are off the bike

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You can achieve the best performance only when make a fully service every time (oil, bushings, oil seals and maybe dust seals). That will make an extra cost of course but it is worthy when you are gunning for the results.

For hobby riders with mini budget it's not necessary to make fully service every time, oil, seals and it will be fine. Bushings need to be checked every time and replace if they are worn.

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They need replaced. You can see copper through the Teflon. They are already apart and no telling how long it will be before they are apart again.

:thumbsup:

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the copper doesnt matter a stuff,

its the teflon that needs checking

hard to tell from the photos,

looks like you have a lot of flash (alloy bits) embeded in one bush and the edge of the teflon doesnt look to clever on the front 2 bushes

'Ha! Been here said this! Thanks for the enlightenment Moggy!

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