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Worst Day on the 450x Ever

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Just got home from the D38 Hare & Hound. Myself and the 450x have had better days. At about race mile 30, I lost it on a snotty mud hill and my day deteriorated from there. The mud was so gooey and sticky that it just kept accumulating to the point where I couldn't even push the bike. Front and rear brake pads were completely toast. Mud and zero brakes don't go well together.

Having strained my already sore wrist and now left with an entombed and brakeless bike, I called it a day. On my way back to the pits, I underestimated the depth and strength of the current of an arroyo on the "dry" lake bed and found myself and the 450x entirely submerged in about 4' of swiftly flowing water. I was completely under for about 5 seconds, when I was able to get my footing and stop us from flowing down with the current. Somehow I was able to hold on to the bike and pull it out of the water. At that moment, I probably could have bench pressed 500 pounds because that's what it felt like I was working against.

The bike immediately hydro-locked and was done. Within 30 seconds or so, the water had drained past the rings and I was able to slowly crank it over, but he was toast at this point. I had to walk 8 miles back to the pits through knee deep water, mud and rain. I was so exhausted by the time I got back to the pits, I nearly fell over. We eventually got a Rhino to pull me out. The rear wheel was so locked up from all the mud, we dragged it about a mile before the rear wheel finally broke free.

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(Rotor guards are not a good idea in very muddy conditions, I discovered. The mud was not flinging off either. The inside of my front fender was clean. Lesson #2: hard terrain tires are not the right choice for mud.)

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So my question is - besides pulling out the spark plug, cranking it over until my leg was numb and spraying ample WD40 down the hole, what more can I do to protect this thing from any further damage? I drained the engine/tranny oil - which was nothing more than grey water. I sprayed contact cleaner up into the transmission and oil drains as well.

Someone told me manually cycling diesel fuel through the motor and transmission is a sure fire way to remove all the contaminants. Does anyone have first-hand experience with this?

Edited by Justin Hambleton

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Deisel or karosene same same. Fill and flush both sides, circulate and drain. Fill with cheap oil, start, warm it up, and drain again. Then fill with your normal oil and you'll be good to go motor wise unless the rod bent. Brakes and clutch as well as CS seal, chain, and wheel bearings need attention too. I know this much because I did the same race today on my 450R and trashed the brakes and clutch. Mud packed in ways I never thought were possible. I must have crashed at least 20 times and kicked that thing about 10,000. Had to stop three times and clear mud with sticks. No goggles for 55 plus miles and no gloves with snotty mud on the grips. No fun with hypothermia especially but I got my pin galldarnit. I never saw a 700 pound 450 R until today. Rough race is an understatement.:banana:

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diesel is the way to go.it's non corrosive, has lubricating properties and displaces water. fill it up in both sides, roll it through and drain it. let it sit without the drain plugs overnight. fill it with cheap detergent oil and run it til warm and drain it again. don't forget to change that filter out each time you change fluids.you may want to do this several times. this may sound strange but you need to clean the carb out too. this would include taking the slide out. you will be suprised how much crud you'll find in this area. you gotta lot to clean so be thorough. good luck:banana:

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With the bike in that condition I would start with cleaning the bike of all external mud,pulling the spark plug and making sure all the water is out...spray some sort of oil into the cylinder to prevent any water damage. Clean the air filter of course. I would fill the engine and tranny back full with new oil and filter. Probably will have to drain the tank and the carburator...So with new oil, New Gas, and clean bike, I would get ready to start it. Put a battery charger on it so it will crank fast with out killing your battery. It will be very difficult to start. Once you start it i woul let it warm up to operating temperature. After it is hot i would shut it off and drain the oils again. Let it drain completely. after it stops dripping I would put the drain plugs and fill it back up..I would then go for an easy ride to keep an eye on it.

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Power washer. My son washed mine and it took two hours. I took stuff off like the CS guard and bash plate so we could wash that crap off. I'm supposed to ride tomorrow but I think I'll work on getting a new bike instead. There's mud and then there's D38 mud. Never in my like have I seen such slippery yet gooey shit. Unreal. I feel for you brother.

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Power washer. My son washed mine and it took two hours. I took stuff off like the CS guard and bash plate so we could wash that crap off. I'm supposed to ride tomorrow but I think I'll work on getting a new bike instead. There's mud and then there's D38 mud. Never in my like have I seen such slippery yet gooey shit. Unreal. I feel for you brother.

Did you finish? Because if you did, my hats off to you. If you remember the 2008 Daytona Supercross - the first loop was most definitely the off-road version of that race and that's no exaggeration. But, I'm no Kevin Windham. I was actually doing fairly well up until RM 30, when my brakes were gone. My strategy was to push ahead on the second loop. I'm bummed I didn't get to enjoy the fun there.

Thanks a ton for the tips. As soon as I got home, I removed the tank and seat and washed all the mud off the motor. I removed the spark plug and kicked until the blow hole stopped. I drained the oil and left the plugs out to drain overnight. I sprayed WD40 down the spark plug hole and kicked it over. I repeated this 5 or 6 times. It's not a good idea to stand over the spark plug hole and kick it over, btw :banana:

I'm going to take it to a do-it-yourself car wash tomorrow to get after the remaining mud, which there is plenty. The mud is better there than on my driveway anyhow :banana: I sprayed Simple Green all over the mud to keep it moist.

I'm planning to tear it completely down once it's clean. I just can't imagine riding it again until I've been able to go over everything. Suspension is going straight to Precision Concepts (needed service anyway), carb will get serviced, drain fuel, grease everything and button it up. I'm actually tempted to send the head to AS for a port & polish. I'd feel better about seeing the cylinder, piston and ring gap as well (just out of curiosity after 70 hours).

One thing I realized is the water we were submerged in had a lot of dirt sediment - it was light brown. I'm concerned about this being in the motor so I'll probably be excessive with cycling diesel fuel and motor oil through the engine and tranny. Am I being overly concerned here?

Honestly, it's days like this that make me not want to race or ride motorcycles again. But, I'll sleep it off and be ready to ride tomorrow :lol:

Edited by Justin Hambleton

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It's not a good idea to stand over the spark plug hole and kick it over, btw :banana:

Funny, but I know what you mean. Don't ask me how I know. :lol:

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You're bike will be fine after some TLC, Justin. I finished the A loop in just under 4 hours:lol::lol::lol:. My "problems" began on the mud fest out of Painted Gorge for the most part. I'll have to completely tear down the bike though. Brakes and clutch are shot and it time for a piston. I survived the nightmare kicking that thing a zillion times and will be limping around work today. Crashing in the mud stretches things that should not be stretched:lol::banana::banana:

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I'm actually tempted to send the head to AS for a port & polish. I'd feel better about seeing the cylinder, piston and ring gap as well (just out of curiosity after 70 hours).

That sounds like a great idea!:banana:

Wow!:lol:

That does not look like fun. I'm glad you guys are ok. Looks like both of you have your work cut out getting the bike back into shape.

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Very good idea to have a look inside at 70 hours especially after that fiasco yesterday, Justin. It's time for a piston anyway IMHO.

It was insane, manx. I would venture to say there was over 50% DNF (without knowing the results). The rescue guys said it looked like a yard sale out there. It was carnage from the bomb all the way through. I won't be riding in those conditions ever again. I put the pin in my little pin case last night smiling because I was thinking about Dewey Belew out there at Check 2....I've not seen him race in the last couple of years but he's one of my all time favorite desert racers. It was awesome to see his smiling face and get a pat on the back by Dewey. He said, "Way to go! You're halfway home!" What a liar.....It was like RM 20:lol::banana::lol:

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Insane is an understatement !!! Sounds like a wicked excursion for sure. I have never attemted to ride in those conditions and from reading the above experiance never will!!! I'm glad you made it Cubera and Justin hang in there clean her up and out everything will be fine just be happy you guys are able to ride still waiting for the snow to go away here!!!! Just think of all the time you get to spend with your baby caressing her and all. LOL!! Good luck with the clean up you two

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Holy crap!

We had a great time in the "dry" high dez.

Thats a switch though.

Lowdez=wet

Hidez=dry

Good luck Justin with the swamp goo.

Its a Honda, It will be as good as new.

Mine was begging me for a full teardown/maintenance/suspension also.

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First... Welcome to D38 Justin!

Second... whoever said D38 was easy (easier than D37), needs to run a rain race

Third... Holy shit.. thats some mud! (I hate mud, as it ruins the cleanliness of a bike - staining and getting into bearings, and seals)

Sounds like you got out, and made it home. Still sucks!! I feel your pain. We've gotten trucks/trailers stuck in that mud when it's raining and someone decides it's "time to get out of here... before it gets worse" type of thing. Always best to wait it out.... it dries within a day or two (enough to get out anyway).

I'd tear that bike down, re-lube every seal or bearing and do as they said by flushing the motor with diesel. In fact, I'd be sure to flush it a couple times right side up, and then once on each side (laying the bike horizontal) and once upside down. There's too many caverns inside that motor that can hold small chunks of dirt and rock, and can cause harm in the future.

I've had a similar experience, but it was in Baja... and I was caught in a flash flood... but on a (Baja race ready) Bomb DS650 that I used to have (no kick start), and a buddies KTM 525. It was KNARLY! Lightning 100' away, 2-3" of water on the ground, slippery, and we mistakenly rode into a water crossing that looked shallow... but was at my neck level when I rode the quad in to cross. SCARY stuff. We made it ourselves 280 miles that day, but I took a shower using the radiator water spicket at the Valley Trinidad Pemex (with full gear on!). :banana:

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I missed my 450X yesterday more than ever. I seriously thought I might not make it out of there between RM35 and 45 and then the last couple of miles over the "dry lake" which has torrents of muddy water and deep pools of standing water. It took me 4 hours to make 56 miles and about half that time was spent trying to clear mud or even pick up the bike. Then to get it kick started finally with a mud packed boot only to crash again in a short distance was rough. In hind sight, it was one of the toughest situations I've even been in on a dirt bike....maybe even the toughest. Hats off to you too, Justin.

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First... Welcome to D38 Justin!

Second... whoever said D38 was easy (easier than D37), needs to run a rain race

Third... Holy shit.. thats some mud! (I hate mud, as it ruins the cleanliness of a bike - staining and getting into bearings, and seals)

Sounds like you got out, and made it home. Still sucks!! I feel your pain. We've gotten trucks/trailers stuck in that mud when it's raining and someone decides it's "time to get out of here... before it gets worse" type of thing. Always best to wait it out.... it dries within a day or two (enough to get out anyway).

I'd tear that bike down, re-lube every seal or bearing and do as they said by flushing the motor with diesel. In fact, I'd be sure to flush it a couple times right side up, and then once on each side (laying the bike horizontal) and once upside down. There's too many caverns inside that motor that can hold small chunks of dirt and rock, and can cause harm in the future.

I've had a similar experience, but it was in Baja... and I was caught in a flash flood... but on a (Baja race ready) Bomb DS650 that I used to have (no kick start), and a buddies KTM 525. It was KNARLY! Lightning 100' away, 2-3" of water on the ground, slippery, and we mistakenly rode into a water crossing that looked shallow... but was at my neck level when I rode the quad in to cross. SCARY stuff. We made it ourselves 280 miles that day, but I took a shower using the radiator water spicket at the Valley Trinidad Pemex (with full gear on!). :banana:

We were pitting in 92 or 93 near Valley T for Donoho when the skies unloaded.

Thought we were going to get washed away. The wash crossing about 500 ft away was a raging river and race TRUCKS were washing down.

Heard Sal get on the radio and state, "Every man for himself".

Makes you feel wanted.

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I've heard your accounts first hand of the time you got stuck in the flash flood in Baja, JJ. That's much scarier than what we went through yesterday IMHO since there was someone within hollering distance the whole race except the last 20 miles or so. I also knew sooner or later I could get to the truck and crank the heater on if I could just keep moving. It became a game of prayer, self talk, and survival. The reward is knowing even highly skilled fast guys have respect for the shared experience with us mere mortals.:banana::lol:

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Honestly, it's days like this that make me not want to race or ride motorcycles again. But, I'll sleep it off and be ready to ride tomorrow :banana:

OK, I slept it off. I'm ready to ride again :lol: I've got two weeks to get it race ready. Let the fun begin!

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We were pitting in 92 or 93 near Valley T for Donoho when the skies unloaded.

Thought we were going to get washed away. The wash crossing about 500 ft away was a raging river and race TRUCKS were washing down.

Heard Sal get on the radio and state, "Every man for himself".

Makes you feel wanted.

I've heard your accounts first hand of the time you got stuck in the flash flood in Baja, JJ. That's much scarier than what we went through yesterday IMHO since there was someone within hollering distance the whole race except the last 20 miles or so. I also knew sooner or later I could get to the truck and crank the heater on if I could just keep moving. It became a game of prayer, self talk, and survival. The reward is knowing even highly skilled fast guys have respect for the shared experience with us mere mortals.:banana::lol:

TW... been there too! And seen race trucks being swept away. I've also seen them sit and wait, while being drenched. Crazy "race" stuff for sure.

Coob... I hear ya. That mud will swallow ya whole. Adding to it, two buds of mine got stuck in the deep sand (or wash quicksand) three weeks ago at Soops area, took them 4hrs to get a bike out. It's now down to it's frame... as there's sand in the cylinder and crankcase.... even inside the swingarm!

Crazy stuff out there in the desert!

OK, I slept it off. I'm ready to ride again :banana: I've got two weeks to get it race ready. Let the fun begin!

BRAAPPP!!

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So my question is - besides pulling out the spark plug, cranking it over until my leg was numb and spraying ample WD40 down the hole, what more can I do to protect this thing from any further damage? I drained the engine/tranny oil - which was nothing more than grey water. I sprayed contact cleaner up into the transmission and oil drains as well.

Someone told me manually cycling diesel fuel through the motor and transmission is a sure fire way to remove all the contaminants. Does anyone have first-hand experience with this?

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=487318&highlight=turned+my+bike+into+submarine+a

Damn brutha sorry...that sounds like hell on earth. I have submerged my bike too but my experience wasnt nearly as bad as yours....keep your chin up you'll get'r going again.

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My bike was completely full of sand and water to the point of being hydro-locked I was surprised at the amount of sand I got out of the tranny.

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