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Running wide in turns?? Husaberg?

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I have a 2010 Husaberg 570 that wants to run wide in the corners.

I am running 113mm sag as apposed to the 105 recomended, and have dropped the forks to the second ring to compensate. I have 2 turns of preload (took one turn off) on the forks and have tried to slow the rebound by 4 clicks and compression a couple as well. I like the way the bike handles everything in a straight line and flicking through the trees, but it just seems to want to run wide in the turns and climb out of the ruts. Just cannot seem to get the front to staydown in the turns.

The 09's came with 19mm clamps and the 10's 22. Should I try a set of those? as I have acces to them, or is it more of a case of changing riding style to compensate for the lack of weight over the front due to the new engine config?

Any thoughts??

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i would try the different offset, its a no cost option that could work.

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I like the way the bike handles everything in a straight line and flicking through the trees, but it just seems to want to run wide in the turns and climb out of the ruts. Just cannot seem to get the front to staydown in the turns.

Hi Fitzy. You sound passionate. I think your engine config has nothing to do with this.

As mog said, try the 19mm offset. Especially since you said it'll cost you nothing. But to get the most out of them, I think you could also try increasing the initial turn in of your bike. So you might need to raise the rear or lower the front. Stability at speed should improve with the 19s.

If climbing out of ruts, then in my experience that can be because: (a) something (or someone) is preventing enough chassis lean of the heavy bike into the turn, and if not laid over enough on entry for the speed and radius then it simply has to straighten up (:banana: the fork rebounding too quick or compression too slow, © just too much rear sag. If not a well defined rut it could be (d) just a poor choice of front tyre.

Maybe slow the fork rebound even more but dont forget to speed up the comp. Or find a smooth flowing rut without aggressive braking on entry to take the dampening settings out of consideration. Maybe the lack of weight on the front is not the engine config, but just the 7mm extra sag you have and your fork height/preload changes are not enough to compensate. If you have the rear setup relatively low just for stability, then maybe you are getting stability via the wrong method and incorrect fork damping is causing headshake for you if not using lots of sag.

Just curious, what is the steering trail on your bike? 19mm offset would be a lot of trail on the Jap bikes. I am at 22 on my KX450F and I've tried 21 and in most conditions the front feels just a bit too slow to grab.

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Hi Fitzy. You sound passionate. I think your engine config has nothing to do with this.

As mog said, try the 19mm offset. Especially since you said it'll cost you nothing. But to get the most out of them, I think you could also try increasing the initial turn in of your bike. So you might need to raise the rear or lower the front. Stability at speed should improve with the 19s.

If climbing out of ruts, then in my experience that can be because: (a) something (or someone) is preventing enough chassis lean of the heavy bike into the turn, and if not laid over enough on entry for the speed and radius then it simply has to straighten up (:banana: the fork rebounding too quick or compression too slow, © just too much rear sag. If not a well defined rut it could be (d) just a poor choice of front tyre.

Maybe slow the fork rebound even more but dont forget to speed up the comp. Or find a smooth flowing rut without aggressive braking on entry to take the dampening settings out of consideration. Maybe the lack of weight on the front is not the engine config, but just the 7mm extra sag you have and your fork height/preload changes are not enough to compensate. If you have the rear setup relatively low just for stability, then maybe you are getting stability via the wrong method and incorrect fork damping is causing headshake for you if not using lots of sag.

Just curious, what is the steering trail on your bike? 19mm offset would be a lot of trail on the Jap bikes. I am at 22 on my KX450F and I've tried 21 and in most conditions the front feels just a bit too slow to grab.

Thanks bloke. Been out the shed today and reset the sag, and put all the clickers back to stock and going to start again. Standard offset is 22 and I like it. Speaking to a few guys and bikes are very sensitive to body position, so I might just have to move this old ASS of mine around a bit more.

Going out tommorrow night so I'll report back. Don't want the 19's if I can help it. Gonna try another front as well later. If it makes any sense, I like the way it steers, but not the way it turns:bonk:

Cheers

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If it makes any sense, I like the way it steers, but not the way it turns
Yes that makes sense. I think turning = steering + lean + traction. Steering alone certainly aint turning the way I feel it. Good luck, and you are welcome.

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The 22mm clamps make everything better on the Husabergs, it makes the bike more stable at high speeds and the sterring is less agressive while cornering.

Never rode the 570 but i normally ride a 450 and a 390 both 09 and 2010 models and i can feel well the diference betwen them.

In my opinion you should put the correct sag and play a bit with the forks in the triple clamps.

The suspension as to be revalved in those bikes even for the weekend warrior, when a proper setup is installed a miracle happens. :banana:

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The 22mm clamps make everything better on the Husabergs, it makes the bike more stable at high speeds and the sterring is less agressive while cornering.
I've played with offset changes a lot on both my 450F and my pitbike. I assume you were referring to an increase on the bergs from 19 up to 22mm.

When increasing the offset, I dont experience what you described at all. When decreasing the offset it increases trail. I feel what I expect, which is slower/delayed steering (although sometimes quicker turning) and more stability - particularly in sand!

I have an e-axle on my 450F and can change my effective offset between 21 and 25mm. I also take care to preserve fork (front ride) height with e-axle adjustments. On my pit bike I changed triple clamps from 37 to 27mm offset and the effect was very obvious.

Stability depends on lots of things. eg. for me, when accelerating, too slow on fork rebound or too fast/soft on fork comp and I can get head shake. Lucky for me what works best for turns gives me little to no headshake.

Fitzy, if you like 22s on your berg, then with 19s you should feel the front tyre contact patch is too slow to respond and steer the front. So you would be able to lean the chassis but it wont begin to turn soon enough, and will tend to fall flat on the inside. Which is why earlier I mentioned ride height. Generally I've found that more trail (lower offset) helps flatter or off camber turns, and less trail helps with banked/bowl corners, and between the trees.

Edited by numroe

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I've played with offset changes a lot on both my 450F and my pitbike. I assume you were referring to an increase on the bergs from 19 up to 22mm.

When increasing the offset, I dont experience what you described at all. When decreasing the offset it increases trail. I feel what I expect, which is slower/delayed steering (although sometimes quicker turning) and more stability - particularly in sand!

I have an e-axle on my 450F and can change my effective offset between 21 and 25mm. I also take care to preserve fork (front ride) height with e-axle adjustments. On my pit bike I changed triple clamps from 37 to 27mm offset and the effect was very obvious.

Stability depends on lots of things. eg. for me, when accelerating, too slow on fork rebound or too fast/soft on fork comp and I can get head shake. Lucky for me what works best for turns gives me little to no headshake.

Fitzy, if you like 22s on your berg, then with 19s you should feel the front tyre contact patch is too slow to respond and steer the front. So you would be able to lean the chassis but it wont begin to turn soon enough, and will tend to fall flat on the inside. Which is why earlier I mentioned ride height. Generally I've found that more trail (lower offset) helps flatter or off camber turns, and less trail helps with banked/bowl corners, and between the trees.

Just out of interest, what sort of fork height changes do you make when switching between different offset triple clamps to reserve front ride height?

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The 22mm clamps make everything better on the Husabergs, it makes the bike more stable at high speeds and the steering is less aggressive while cornering.

The 22 mm triple clamps may improve some things, but I seriously doubt that high speed stability is one of them.

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Went out tonight for a few laps and the soil was a bit fluffy? In other words the berms would not hold you as they would push out.

Discovered a few things though.

With original sag, 105mm, the forks at the second ring, I started at 18 0n the rebound and have ended up at 14, may go back to 15. This is a huge improvement, but I think a revalve might be in the works.

bike now turns a heap better but you have to be on your game if it decides to tuck,

If you get aggressive and put you weight out and forward, it makes a huge differance on this bike, seems very weight sensitive to me. I will leave it as it is for the time and get it back out in the bush on the weekend, as its a new ball game out there to an MX track. Looked back at a few photo's from the weekend and did notice that it uses nearly all of its suspension on the upramps and on landings but only remember it bottoming once and that was on an overjump and landing on the flat, so its pretty close for my offroad speed, nice and plush, just how I like it, for an old fart like me!! but may start firming it up and see how it responds

Will report back next week

Edited by fitzy

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Fitzy, sorry about the temp thread hijack I'm about to do ...

Just out of interest, what sort of fork height changes do you make when switching between different offset triple clamps to reserve front ride height?
I think I know what you mean, but I'm not changing the offset in the triples. I'm changing it in the axle. Look at the following drawing. I know this is a road bike but the forks are in front of the stem, so the principle is the same.

bikegeometry.jpg

Take a look at the diagram below. If I change the offset via the axle, then the fork length typically changes too. So if I want to change just the offset and not the height, then sometimes I move the forks in the clamps. First time I put the e-axle in and tried it in a few diff positions I thought hey it feels like the sag is changing. Rekluse market it as a super quick adjust, and for sure it's quicker than changing triples! But for most adjustments you need move the forks a little too.

Interesting Rekluse say that less offset increases front wheel traction. I dont think of it that way. I think the offset is more about the timing between chassis lean and front steer. There is a sweet spot where the steering re-directs the front the right amount and also the chassis feels very top-light.

Picture2.png

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Fitzy, sorry about the temp thread hijack I'm about to do ...

You go for it girlfriend!!! :ride:You make more sense than me!!!:banana:

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You go for it girlfriend!!!
:banana: ... :lol:

Hey, were in Aus are you doing your night riding?

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