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90 degree creek crossing embankment

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Yesterday while riding, I encountered a 6 foot high 90 degree creek embankment. the entry was an easy :banana: 30 or 35 degrees, the creek had a hard sand bottom (no rocks) and was about one bike length wide, the opposite side started at 45 degrees and quickly slopped to 60 or 70, the last 1 1/2 feet was 90. It took 8 attempts to get the bike to land on the top. I always had plenty of speed and easily cleared the top of the embankment, however I could never get the front wheel to come down. Basiclly I would go straight up and come straight down. when I did make it, I don't know why I made it. any hints. I gave up after I made it, my handle bars were too bent at that point.

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Gotta be standing up, weight forward with your head/upper body over the bars and as soon as the front clears, throw your weight forward even more. Definitely a situation where you can't just be a passenger along for the ride.

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You need to have some forward momentum (not all up). Using the back break once the front is up and above the lip will get your front wheel to move forward over the lip too.

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I was just making a trail like that today along a creek at my house today, hopefully I'll get to ride it when all the snow melts!

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Start at 1:04. Look how shane does it. I'm sure yours was steeper but you can see how he uses his body weight.

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Well when I cross a creek, I always stand and shift my weight back. As you approach the bank I would have my line picked already, I would keep my weight back. And as you start up it, start shifting my weight forward little by little, until my front tire is just over the top of the bank, then use core muscles to throw my body fast and far forward. This should take care of it, and with a little practice it should be very fun.

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how i would do somthing like this, is to keep the front wheel lightly loaded, or evan skimming just off the surface of the bank, this loads the rear suspention allowing the bike to maintain some forward momentum, as soon as the front wheel clear's pull the clutch and hit the rear brake to unload the suspension leveling the bike out somewhat, this reqiured a bit more speed then otherwise but works much better once mastered.

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Start at 1:04. Look how shane does it. I'm sure yours was steeper but you can see how he uses his body weight.

Is the Shane Watts series of DVD's worth buying?

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I just finished up the Dirtwise class this weekend. We worked on steep hills. One thing Shane pointed out that I did wrong was tried to hit the hill too fast! Watch the transition and adjust your entry speed accordingly.

If you ever have a chance to take the class, do it! He does some amazing things on his video but nothing compares to standing a few feet away from one of his demonstrations. He demonstrated negotiating a rutty section of our practice trail.... FIVE different ways. One line he chose.... I saw it with my own eyes and have had two days to think about it. I still don't see how he did it.

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Start at 1:04. Look how shane does it. I'm sure yours was steeper but you can see how he uses his body weight.

got to ride with him a few weeks back in some of the most technical areas i know of and he cleaned everything as if we were riding on fire roads.. :lol::banana:

and just as the others said, but i usually approach it with good throttle and then let off as my front wheel gets up over the lip just enough for the engine braking and my leaning to bring the bike forward and still get the back wheel up and over

Edited by Travis 22

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The key is using the clutch to bring the front wheel down but the rear rolling, and having your body as far over those bars as possible :banana:

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+1 on the Shane Watts videos -- They are good and helpful, with lots of good tips. I am sure other videos are also good.

but the class is 10 times better. Worth every penny.

He breaks things down into the most simple actions, then builds them up into complex steps, and then puts them to use on trails.

Before his class, I thought that I moved around, forward, backward, etc. I was only using about 50% of what I could. Body movement, positioning and bike momentum will get you through almost anything.

For standing - if you have not stared straight down at the front of your fender, you are not getting far enough forward.

For sitting - if you dont have your nuts on top of the gas cap, you are not far enough forward.

For the creek bank you are describing, it sounds like you need to be throwing your weight from back to front as you climb up the bank, so the bike rotates forward.

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thanks for the replies, if it drys up this tomorrow i'm going to try the same embankment again. i got a new set of bars from cycle gears last night.

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Generally I ease off on the last 1/4 or 1/3 depending on the slope / momentum. On something like your describing I'd start accelerating 1 to 2 meters before - but not manically enough to break traction - maintain acceleration through the first half or until my front was just touching the start of the 90 degree bit and then ease off as soon as the front was touching the top of the lip. Your back will kick up slightly as you come over helping to drop the front. With most of these sharp faces you seem to need less speed than you think.

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