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Oil or No oil on 2 stroke rebuild?

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Im in the process of putting a top end in an 03 CR250R (2-stroke). Cylinder and head are in good shape, lowwer end is good, ready to start puting everything back together now. Ive heard from some guys the old school way of rebuilding is to NOT put any oil on the cylinder walls when first putting everything back together, just lube the wrist pin and bearing and the fuel will lubricate everything once the motor is running. Ive also heard guys say the new school way is to put a light coating of oil on the cylinder walls to help ease everything with the break in process. The logic behind the dry rebuild is that this helps the rings seet correctly. The wet logic is that it wont matter that theres oil the rings will seet any how. Not sure what meathod i want to go with any insight would be greatly appreciated.

PS everyone agrees that the only lube to use is 2 stroke oil

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yeah ive always smeared a light coating of oil on the cylinder,pin and bearing. Helps with installation and is alot easier on the parts when you first start the bike

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Im in the process of putting a top end in an 03 CR250R (2-stroke). Cylinder and head are in good shape, lowwer end is good, ready to start puting everything back together now. Ive heard from some guys the old school way of rebuilding is to NOT put any oil on the cylinder walls when first putting everything back together, just lube the wrist pin and bearing and the fuel will lubricate everything once the motor is running. Ive also heard guys say the new school way is to put a light coating of oil on the cylinder walls to help ease everything with the break in process. The logic behind the dry rebuild is that this helps the rings seet correctly. The wet logic is that it wont matter that theres oil the rings will seet any how. Not sure what meathod i want to go with any insight would be greatly appreciated.

PS everyone agrees that the only lube to use is 2 stroke oil

Ah, if you want longevity out of your motor you definatly want lube up the cylinder and the new parts. Properly breaking in the motor is important aswell. Two stroke oil will be fine, since you probably have some close by.

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The most knowledgeable (based on observed results) racing engine builders I know lube their top ends on assembly. They do not dunk the piston in a bucket of oil, or anything, but they do lube them to avoid the damage that can occur during the first few revolutions under power. One or two of them prefer dry lubricants such as tungsten disulfide, but none of the good ones I'm familiar with build them dry.

Modern rings will seat regardless of the presence of a reasonable amount of oil (which is going to be there well before the rings actually finish seating, anyway), and are as likely to fail to seat as a result of micro-scoring during a dry start up as from flashing or glazing from excess oil.

You don't need a lot of oil, and too much can be counterproductive, but none is just too risky. A light film on the cylinder wall and the top and bottom surfaces of the rings is enough.

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Semi Dry. A drop of oil inside the needle bearing, inserting the pin and rotating the pin to spread the oil. Put a light coat on the cylinder walls then run clean paper towels through the cylinder until they come out looking clean. That way there is a light film of oil on the cylinder.

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