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Final bleed procedure for a piston rezzy type shock?

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This is a Sachs shock from an 09' Husky.

I assembled the shock dry, set the piston setback at 20mm and proceeded to fill and bleed the shock using the comp adjuster method. Everything went smooth.

I buttoned the shock up and compressed the rod into the body and I am only able to compress it about 3/4 of the way before it locks from the fluid pressure. And it does not rebound completely back to fully extended position. I assume I need to perform a final bleed or possibly have overfilled the oil.

I'm at the point where the shock body and rezzy are full of oil and bled of air. The rezzy is unpressurized and the shock is sealed. What is the proper final bleed procedure for this type of shock?

Thanks!!!

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This is a Sachs shock from an 09' Husky.

I assembled the shock dry, set the piston setback at 20mm and proceeded to fill and bleed the shock using the comp adjuster method. Everything went smooth.

I buttoned the shock up and compressed the rod into the body and I am only able to compress it about 3/4 of the way before it locks from the fluid pressure. And it does not rebound completely back to fully extended position. I assume I need to perform a final bleed or possibly have overfilled the oil.

I'm at the point where the shock body and rezzy are full of oil and bled of air. The rezzy is unpressurized and the shock is sealed. What is the proper final bleed procedure for this type of shock?

Thanks!!!

You will need to hold the separator piston in place while bleeding the shaft. If not, it will move every time you stroke the shaft. So in essence it moved on you and is locking ( floating piston is bottomed). Perform your bleed with pressure in the ressy, to keep the floating piston from moving.I think you will need to do a conventional bleed ( not building it dry) unless you have a vacuum pump.

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You will need to hold the separator piston in place while bleeding the shaft. If not, it will move every time you stroke the shaft. So in essence it moved on you and is locking ( floating piston is bottomed). Perform your bleed with pressure in the ressy, to keep the floating piston from moving.I think you will need to do a conventional bleed ( not building it dry) unless you have a vacuum pump.

Thanks for the input!

That certainly makes sense.

Would removing the rezzy cap and letting the piston bottom out on the circlip be of any benefit during bleeding? Or would it get 'pulled' into the body when I depress the shaft?

Then I could set the piston setback after its been bled by loosening the comp assembly and pushing the piston to its proper depth with the comp assembly loose.

Or is charging the rezzy the real answer? Does it require a full charge or just a partial?

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Thanks for the input!

That certainly makes sense.

Would removing the rezzy cap and letting the piston bottom out on the circlip be of any benefit during bleeding? Or would it get 'pulled' into the body when I depress the shaft?

Then I could set the piston setback after its been bled by loosening the comp assembly and pushing the piston to its proper depth with the comp assembly loose.

Or is charging the rezzy the real answer? Does it require a full charge or just a partial?

Here is how I do those.

Fill the ressy with fluid make sure you top it off. Install the separator piston.

push and bottom out the piston. Install the ressy cap and add pressure. I use around 70psi.( this will hold the separator piston in a bottomed out state) Fill the shock body with fluid. install piston and shaft and bleed the shaft. After you feel you have all the air out let the N pressure out, top the shock body off with fluid now twist the seal head down while holding the shock shaft and install the seal head as close to the cir clip groove as possible. Install the cir clip and pressurize. Put the shock in a vise or what ever you use. with the comp adj at its highest point stroke the shaft a few more times. Let the N pressure out

loosen the comp adjuster and allow it to sit in this position for a while allowing any trapped bubbles to make there way out. tighten the comp adjuster.. Charge to the desired pressure. I use 140 psi.

The seal head will set the floating piston depth...

Hope this helps

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The seal head will set the floating piston depth..

So no need to measure and set the piston depth? Just let the seal head push it into place and the n2 pressure will set it properly?

Hope this helps

Thank you! Tremendous help. :banana:

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