Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

2010 KTM 450 EXC - Rekluse - Yes or No?

Recommended Posts

Getting the new 2010 KTM 450 EXC Califonia Plated machine :banana:

Doing a few upgrades. Considering a Rekluse clutch.....................

What to do? I have only rode a bike with a Rekluse maybe 10 miles. Is it worth the money? I get the feeling it is something you have to get used to.

Input from the peanut gallery is appreciated. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

08 KTM 450 XCRW. Rode it for over a year w/o my current Rekluse Pro. Need it? Not necessarily. But, it comes in handy in some conditions (paddlin' through mud, rock gardens, etc... We have the same motor, it does not stall easy and the clutch action is quite good. For Dual sport, it's nice to sit at a light in gear without having the clutch pulled it. If you get the Pro model, you can clutch just like normal if you feel the need, so it's not something that takes much getting used to IMHO. If the pocketbook allows, I don't see any real downside and a few nice upsides, depending upon where you ride.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
08 KTM 450 XCRW. Rode it for over a year w/o my current Rekluse Pro. Need it? Not necessarily. But, it comes in handy in some conditions (paddlin' through mud, rock gardens, etc... We have the same motor, it does not stall easy and the clutch action is quite good. For Dual sport, it's nice to sit at a light in gear without having the clutch pulled it. If you get the Pro model, you can clutch just like normal if you feel the need, so it's not something that takes much getting used to IMHO. If the pocketbook allows, I don't see any real downside and a few nice upsides, depending upon where you ride.

my thoughts too, run one on my yz and it cuts down on shifting from 3rd to 2nd alot, also if you misjudge and are a gear high then just hit the gas. hope to install one on the 450exc, the bike has too much power for tight single track and hopefully it will tame it down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bryan hit it spot on regarding the clutch action. I was going to buy one for my new KTM and after riding it for awhile decided I didn't need one, even racing EX on a ski resort... the bike engine characteristics with a smooth easy clutch makes it easy on the arms.

In ultra tight trails, I could see the need for one...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I drank the orange coolaid a little over two years ago with the 08 450 EXC. And today I drank the Rekluse coolaid. Time will tell if I become a convert and love it like the rest of you. :banana:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never rode with one but someone brought up a good point I never thought off. He was on an off camber steep switch back once and the bike would just keep rolling when stalled. He said after he almost tumbled down a cliff he promptly got rid off it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I never rode with one but someone brought up a good point I never thought off. He was on an off camber steep switch back once and the bike would just keep rolling when stalled. He said after he almost tumbled down a cliff he promptly got rid off it

Good point, I never thought of that one. I just bought the Pro model and hope to get it installed this weekend. I've heard so many good things about these clutches but losing the lock up when the engine stalls can be an issue on steep hills/rock gardens. Thanks for the heads up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just bought a bike with a rekluse and LHRB. I am up in the air about it. I live in a land of step-ups (Moab) so my carb has to be perfect. I miss the get yourself out of trouble clutch and rev. I think the pro would be killer best of both worlds. I'm going to give it a few months to get used to, I'm worried about pulling the brake when I want power though. If you just give a bit of gas you can get the clutch to catch easily, I was worried about this the most.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I never rode with one but someone brought up a good point I never thought off. He was on an off camber steep switch back once and the bike would just keep rolling when stalled. He said after he almost tumbled down a cliff he promptly got rid off it

This scenario illustrates one of many situations where the LHRB proves to be indispensable for use with the auto clutch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But, would the bike have stalled to begin with?

??

The fact that the auto clutch engine was stalled or not is really immaterial since the engine is always basically in neutral when the bike is moving slowly or stopped.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In neutral when moving slowly? Not in my experience. I guess it must be how I ride. My point was, how'd he stall the bike out to being w/ with an autoclutch? I know it's possible, but in my use, it doesn't happen very often at all. Essentially to the point of not something to worry about IMHO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In neutral when moving slowly? Not in my experience. I guess it must be how I ride. My point was, how'd he stall the bike out to being w/ with an autoclutch? I know it's possible, but in my use, it doesn't happen very often at all. Essentially to the point of not something to worry about IMHO.

I guess it all depends if the person stalling has actually fine tuned the engagement. I tested mine over the course of about 4 hours. Took it apart about 5 times until I got it perfect. I tested the manual clutch repeatedly under different situations,to find out where I was revving with the manual clutch(which turned out to be approx. 2200rpm) When I finally got the REKLUSE right it was engaging at about 2100-2200 rpm. Perfect for bush use and not a worry about stalling out, almost ever. Most of the times when it stalls out will be associated with a bad decision on my part picking the wrong line or locking the rear brake at the wrong time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I guess it all depends if the person stalling has actually fine tuned the engagement. I tested mine over the course of about 4 hours. Took it apart about 5 times until I got it perfect. I tested the manual clutch repeatedly under different situations,to find out where I was revving with the manual clutch(which turned out to be approx. 2200rpm) When I finally got the REKLUSE right it was engaging at about 2100-2200 rpm. Perfect for bush use and not a worry about stalling out, almost ever. Most of the times when it stalls out will be associated with a bad decision on my part picking the wrong line or locking the rear brake at the wrong time.

I think you're spot on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But, would the bike have stalled to begin with?

We have switchbacks here in washingon where you come up to a section of trail simply gives way/ disappears to a solid granit rock with hundreds of feet sheer drop offs. It's up to the rider to interpit where the trail is. I can see someone freezing in a section like that if your scared to death of hights(like me) haha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We have switchbacks here in washingon where you come up to a section of trail simply gives way/ disappears to a solid granit rock with hundreds of feet sheer drop offs. It's up to the rider to interpit where the trail is. I can see someone freezing in a section like that if your scared to death of hights(like me) haha

We have a few trails like that here in Colorado. :banana: :banana: :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This scenario illustrates one of many situations where the LHRB proves to be indispensable for use with the auto clutch.

or you could always grab the RHFB :banana:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
??

The fact that the auto clutch engine was stalled or not is really immaterial since the engine is always basically in neutral when the bike is moving slowly or stopped.

not so, when properly adjusted the auto clutch acts very similar to a conventional clutch at very low speeds. the auto clutch really only comes into play when taking off slowly or accelerating in too high of a gear otherwise rides pretty much the same as a stock clutch. just my opinion. i like the rekluse in the gnarly "get off and walk it" using the engine to propel over rocks/roots or whatever. its nice not to have to work the clutch lever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
not so, when properly adjusted the auto clutch acts very similar to a conventional clutch at very low speeds. the auto clutch really only comes into play when taking off slowly or accelerating in too high of a gear otherwise rides pretty much the same as a stock clutch. just my opinion. i like the rekluse in the gnarly "get off and walk it" using the engine to propel over rocks/roots or whatever. its nice not to have to work the clutch lever.

I'll stand by my statement. I said that the engine is basically in neutral when the bike is moving slowly or stopped. By moving slowly I mean moving below the clutch engagement RPM. At this speed or when stopped the engine is basically in neutral since the clutch is automatically disengaged. There is not really much to argue about here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

stalling and no bump start and stall on a hill climb are the only two riding issues I had. The issue mechanically I had was that sometimes the timing of being on the gas and locking the rear wheel would be a little off and it would kill the motor going into a corner. With a clutch you just seat bounce and keep going.

The bike WILL stall if you lock up the rear wheel in some cases. I had one on my 200, havent tried it on the 4st with elec start yet.That would help over come the problem of a restart on a hillside for sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×