Jump to content
Antigravity Batteries Giveaways: Winners Announced! Read more... ×
Sign in to follow this  

Chain Length, Gearing, Shortened Wheelbase for woods???

Recommended Posts

sorry for all of the noob questions but i need conformation before ordering sum parts...and i did do several searches :lol:

the bike is an 06 400 EXC used for woods riding and hare scrambles/enduros.

stock gearing and chain length is 14/45 and 116 link...correct?

currently the PO had put a 13/50 combo w/ a 116 link chain(including master) and my adjusters are all of the way back BUT w/ the wear and hooking on the countershaft sprocket i'm assuming a worn/"streched" chain.

is the 116 chain length the correct for 13/50 combo?

do people run shorter chains to bring the wheel forward past the center of the adjusters to shorten the wheelbase for better turning or is that a no-no on these bikes??? i am running a steering damper.

TIA

:banana:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah...i saw the thread

info from the "other" site appears that most prefer run'n the wheel back w/ a longer wheelbase.

no one knows the stock gearing & chain length for the newer 400/450 RFS?!? :banana:

:lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was running a 13/50 combo my counter sprocket was hooking bad. Chain was fine. Put on a new chain, new cs sprocket. and it hooked again, not too mention I was going thru about 2 swingarm chain sliders a summer. And yes, my chain was adjusted fine. The 13/50 combo chewed up that slider and sprocket every time. I am now running a 14/50 combo and the wear and tear is much better. I do all woods and trails.. 450exc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey for us sport riders and C and B class riders we may never feel the difference in wheelbase. It will change also as your chain and sprockets wear. It's worth playing with thou as it will make a difference in hook up coming out of corners. Shorter wheelbase will get the tire underneath a little more and transfer wieght to the rear. Ride height will also do the same thing. Lowering the rear allows the chain to pull off the top of the swingarm and compress the shock.

Backing off on the fork preload will lower the front end and help it to turn in better.

It all gets pretty complicated. Nice of KTM to put the basic settings in writing so that after we get it all jacked up we can start over with settings that work pretty well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

40 years of racing and riding and i cant really feel a difference between the rear wheel beeing near the front or the rear of the adjusters. to me the right gearing is 1000 times more important than if the rear wheel 1/2 inch forward or rearward.

on my 08 530 i run 13/48 works great for the mixed riding i like. for pure woods riding i would probably use 13/50. i have heard of some bikes having trouble with wear on a 13 tooth front but i never have had a problem, i know a guy running a 12t.

front sprocket wear is USUALLY a chain adjustment issue. ktm has a different tension setting than asian bikes.

i have found the right to check it is to remove the shock...easy on a ktm...and run the swingarm thru the full arch of travel, find the tightest point and set the chain just under snug. just a bit LOOSER than tight at that point is perfect. you dont want it tight at any point but not TOO loose either. once you find that spot on your bike, put the shock back in, and verify how it hangs and figure out your own point to feel the tension, and always set it at that after it has been verified.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got a 96 KX 250 and do mainly single track/tight woods.

should i have the rear wheel closer to the mud flap, or further to the end or the arm.

i'm a light rider, so i do want as muchsag/softness as possible, but i'm just curious because i have to tighten my chain and i'm wondering whether to take out a link and bring it up, or just push it back for longer wheel base/softer suspension.

I can have a little over a fist from the black swingarm rubber piece to the chain(slackwise) and my adjuster is at the very middle.

out a link?

or move to end of arm?

thanks for any help

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well i wasn't planning on getting a new chain, cause mine is pretty good looking.

but what yyour suggesting is take a link?

that was my thought that i was leaning twards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my experience is you would feel the effect much more of moveing the forks up or down in the clamps than you will feel by moving the rear wheel forward or backward.

if you push the forks up into the clamps so that a 1/4 to 3/8 of an inch is exposed above the clamps the steering will quicken up and feel lighter in the steering, but you will sacrifice a little stability on high speed stuff.

the steering head rake and angle is what makes the front end feel sluggish and heavy more than thae rear wheel

imho

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×