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Eating before surgery

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Im scheduled to have surgery next week on my collarbone. They say that you can not eat after mid night the day before surgery. Thats all fine, but my surgery is scheduled for 3 o clock in the after noon. Even if you have a morning surgery you still have to stop eating at midnight.

If i have to go from midnight til 5 or 6 before i have anything to eat i might just die.

Is the midnight rule just to make things easier? Or is there actually a reason to it? Would it be a problem to eat something at 3 or 4 in the morning and then not eat til after the surgery? Or should i just load up food the night before?

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i think it is to keep you from throwing up on yourself and them , and also they don't want you taking a dump on the table either. all that could cause problems.

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correct me if I am wrong but it is so you don't throw up and aspirate that crap into your lungs.. Not good.. I am sure if your surgery is at 3 you could eat later but why not just call the surgeon and ask them?

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Most people say after midnight, just to keep it the same for everybody. If someone shows up for surgery, and they ate breakfast or drank coffee they have two choices: reschedule or wait six hours.

Aspiration is is the key concern. An aspiration pneumonia can become nasty. Not worth the risk for an elective surgery.

So, it would depend on what the anesthesiologist has to say--he's the one that will cancel the case if you eat. And if you do it and blow junks, they are going to know how long it has been based on how digested the food is.

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It is vitally important that you not eat. The reason you feel so hungry is because you are focused on the fact that you cannot have anything to eat or drink. You need to keep your stomach empty so there is no chance that you will vomit and aspirate (inhale) the contents of your stomach into your lungs during your procedure. Doing so could cause death or Aspiration Pneumonia which is extremely difficult to treat... certainly not worth the risk.

Why not try doing something to occupy your mind like watching a movie, reading a book or magazine, playing a game? Do something that doesn't require physical activity that might make you thirsty, but will keep you busy. The time will pass faster that way.

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just gorge yourself up till midnight. stay up as late as you can and then crash and try to sleep until time to get up and get ready. if your surgery is at 3 then you'll probably have to check in by 12:30 or so. just man up, it ain't that bad

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You could try to reschedule your surgery for early in the morning.

Actually, the hunger thing for that short of a period is mainly in your head. Try chewing gum or something to distract you. Or just get your mind set on the fact that it's what you gotta do.

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The reason all patients are fasted is because the order of the operating list may change - if a major case in the morning is cancelled because the patient shows up still on blood-thinners, or with a chest infection, you might find you're bumped ahead so it may be that you've been told to fast for the morning session in case this happens.

Pre-operative fasting is a murky old subject at the best of times - the standard approach is 6 hours for solids, 4 hours for liquids, 2 hours for clear liquids; but this varies between units.

Some say nothing at all from midnight before, which is a bit excessive!

What I have done before any surgery is keep drinking clear fluids until a couple of hours before (the rule-of-thumb for this is any fluid you can read newsprint through - i.e. weak tea, orange juice, sports drinks etc.), but you might find yourself cancelled if you do this.

-John

p.s Some anaesthetists will cancel you if you are chewing gum when they come to see you pre-op, the theory being that this still stimulates stomach acid production and may increase the risk of acid aspiration in the same way eating and swallowing does. I don't buy it, but some do.

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