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1999 ktm 360

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hey all, so after not having a bike for a few months I have decided it is time to get one again. I am looking at a 1999 ktm 360. I used to have a ktm 200 and loved it, how would the 360 compare? I am 6'4 and ride pretty hard, usually trails.

Thanks!

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How would it compare? Its like 2x the displacement... make that 1.8 times

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Very good, I too know simple math, I was wondering about the bike as a whole, suspension, frame design, powerband etc. I realise it will have more power. None the less thank you for your reply.

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My brother has one. Before we rebuilt it the PO had the transfer port opening exactly wrong, the pv would not open, and the tranny ate a few pv screws w/o any damage. The forks have probably never been rebuilt, shock has probably never been serviced. The bike still ran great and had a ton of torque. Not much on the top end. Now is should be a real handful. Great bikes.

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I am not sure what model it is, the guy that has it does not seem to know much about bikes. He said i has a desert tank, and thats about all he knows.

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Nothing too tight then? Mostly wide open? If so, this bike could be a blast. What is the price?

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there isnt a 360 worth 3gs let alone trading a truck too. The nicest 380 Ive seen lately is like new, an 02 and has a plate, most are under 3gs anyway cuz they are getting old. So, looks like you are paying wayy too much unless its the bike I saw on the net.

Maybe I read it wrong, you are getting the bike and 3gs.

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360s are great for fast trail riding. However, they hit very hard and are notoriously difficult to jet--not a beginners bike. If I could get one cheap, I would grab one, they are lots of fun.

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After a few years with a 125EXC I now have a 300EXC. The 300 is actually lighter than the 125 because it is not road legal and equipped with a battery, lights, and extra gear. Just bare bike. Even so, the 300 feels heavy and dangerous compared to the 125. The 125 seems to be very "spill resistant", handles mud and obstacles with ease. An upset is easily recovered from.

The 300 has gobs of torque, but you have to be very careful with the throttle. A little too much or too little can upset you or drag the rear tire. I find I am more tense and more restrained on the 300. I would assume the 360 (or 380) would be even more like this.

That aside, other differences you would note from your 200, is that the larger bike has much more torque on the sand hills and hill climbs. It does have or need the same RPMs to get things done. Gear selections are not so important. Top speeds are about the same. If my 300 is sprocketed to attain speeds higher than 140kph I will start to loose low speed capability in 1st gear. It is can accelerate and wheelie like crazy at high speeds but for all intents and purposes has the same speed range as the 125EXC. The 125 and 200 have the advantage of higher available RPMs and an extra gear which gives them over 130 kph top speeds while still geared for enduro. Blows away any motocross or close ratio geared bikes on the flat stretches.

Hill climbs and fast trail riding? The 360 would be a good choice of bike. Woods and tight trails, look for a 200. $4500 truck traded for the bike and $3000 cash would be a good deal around here. Even a clapped out Japanese 1995 250 MX will bring $1500 here.

Be careful when buying anything used, little things can bite you bad.

Leaky shocks can eat up $200 if nothing is broken, $1000 if you didn't catch it in time.

Loose spokes may be over $200 per wheel to fix.

False neutral in the transmission could be over $800 to fix.

Clutch drags when in gear or slips under load is $200-$600 to repair.

Worn out sprockets and chain, over $120. Tires? Another $150-$250 with tubes.

Low compression? Just needs a ring he says? Over $500 if it needs a replate.

That said, there are good buys out there, especially if you can do your own work.

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