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how to properly warm up/idle a 2t????

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I been riding at the local indoor tracks and its winter time here in ohio. temps well below freeezing. i was wondering how to warm up the bike and idle it properly while waiting to ride???

someone just showed to me hold the throttle maybe a quarter open then rev it to warm it up. I do this at first but then i go to just reving the bike while waiting cause i dont know how long i will have to wait to get on the track. do i keep the gas on the whole time??? Or on and off? Pretty much every session i go on the track i gotta warm the bike up all over again.

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Blip the throttle, don't let it idle for too long.

At the same time try not to rev it out because cold engines don't like high revs.

You will know when its warm when radiators hare hot to touch.

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for the first start of the day what i do is keep the choke on until the rads warm up, after a little rest i just idle it for 20 secs then ride slowly

my bike still works so i'am happy

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I only use the choke until the bike starts, then i turn it off. Let it idle for 3-4 minutes while blipping the throttle. Once the cylinder/head is hot to the touch and the radiator is pretty warm/hot you're good to go.

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i start mine with the choke and once it starts i shut the choke off. then i hold the idle steady until i feel some heat on the transfer area of the cyl. if you blip the throttle on and off you are letting alot of fuel in and then shutting off the air. i found from racing sleds in the winter that if you get some heat in the transfer area of the cyl the motor is more throughly warmed up. you are not feeling heat from water transfer. just my opinion.

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I think the main thing you want to about is blasting to high revs under load before all the parts have expanded. Normally the piston will heat up much quicker than the larger cylinder, and you will get the classic "cold seize". All the advice above is great. I usually just hold my throttle a little above idle, with maybe some gentile blipping, until I can feel some heat in the cylinder. Then I ride around slow for a few minutes, and gradually pick up the pace. It's a good warmup for bike and body.

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