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removing injector

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Yes, you can do it, but it's tricky! Did you ever play "Operation" as a kid???

Okay, here we go. There are two ways to do this, but the easiest is to remove seat and tank completely. The fuel hose connection at the tank is removed by first gently prying the plastic cover away from the fuel pump, then squeezing the blueish-green part of the fuel connector together.

This will allow you to slide the fuel hose backwards off of the fuel pump barb.

Be careful, as a little gas may spray out as you do this as it's under pressure.

Next, remove the top 2 subframe bolts and loosen the bottom 2. This will allow the subframe to "relax" backwards a little bit making the next "operation" much easier. Next clean the area with contact cleaner .A little compressed air doesn't hurt, either.

Remove the zip ties that are holding the wiring harness around the tank/shock mount area. This will allow you to reach under this area, above the injector, and move the harness out of your way. If you use a flashlight, you will be able to look between the frame and the air boot at the back of the injector. It's mounted with 2 5mm screws with 8mm heads.

To remove these, use a 1/4" setup with a wobbly socket, and at least a 6" extension. 3/8 is too big to fit. A flashlight shining from the front side is helpful while doing this. After loosening the bolts completely, use a long-reach magnet to grab the bolts out. If you don't they will fall into oblivion. Don't ask how I know this!

Next, remove the connector to the injector, and twist the injector up and to the side while holding the harness back towards the shock. There might be some dirt in this area, so spray with contact cleaner liberally first. You can't make it too clean! To take the fuel line off the injector just pull apart.

That's it! To install, reverse order of removal. It will take 7-10 kicks to build fuel pressure back up.

Hope this helps!

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Awesome - I will gown up for surgery later today :banana:

Need to clean the injector to see if it help my starting issue

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Awesome - I will gown up for surgery later today :banana:

Need to clean the injector to see if it help my starting issue

Injectors are sealed units, unless you have a machine like an ASNU diagnostic machine you are potentially going to damage it at worst, or at best do nothing.

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If I was gonna pull the injector because it isn't working right, I would go ahead and replace it.

Just my opinion.

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Injectors are sealed units, unless you have a machine like an ASNU diagnostic machine you are potentially going to damage it at worst, or at best do nothing.

I don't know about that, my injector was not spraying through all the holes, so we energized it with a 9-volt battery, and back-flushed it with carb cleaner and compressed air and it worked awesome! Runs like new!

You gotta think that these units are pretty hearty having to withstand high temps, pressure, gasoline, and the occaisional backfire!

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I don't know about that, my injector was not spraying through all the holes, so we energized it with a 9-volt battery, and back-flushed it with carb cleaner and compressed air and it worked awesome! Runs like new!

You gotta think that these units are pretty hearty having to withstand high temps, pressure, gasoline, and the occaisional backfire!

How did you know it was not spraying through all the holes? Without pressure behind it and turning it on and off at 500x -11,000x per minute, you didn't have a GOOD idea how it was operating. On the bike, you can't see the spray pattern OR measure the flow rate.

Now, if it was not running well, and you got it to go with a 9vt battery (injectors operate on 12vt) you got lucky:ride: Nothing wrong with a bit of luck every now and then.

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If he got it to open and hold with the 9 volt battery (which I doubt if he's talking about one of those transistor radio batts...not enough current) he could back flush it and clear the holes.

Most fuel injectors need about 4-6 amps to run. A 9 volt transistor radio batt. isnt going to provide that, or even close. If it would, you sure as hell wouldnt put one on youre tounge to test it!! :banana:

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don't buy it. "backflushing" won't work as there is a fine mesh filter basket in the top feed area of the injector. You would need to remove that, and nothing is getting past that filter that could simply block one of the holes. there is another problem.

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Yeah, you're right, I made the whole thing up because I'm a glory whore.

W. A. T!

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On 12/23/2017 at 0:41 PM, logmaster said:

I just tried the 9 volt on the injector. Yes, it works. 

Melkman is right about the final pre-injector pintle filter though. If you were to pluck that out, then back flush, then put that back...that's a different story. That's a common problem on the KTMs.

 

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I dont know about the filter, I just know it clicked open & closed & I could shoot cleaner & air through it when opened.

And I dont know anything about gotwings, he still could be a glory whore.  ;)

 

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On 12/27/2017 at 7:44 AM, logmaster said:

I dont know about the filter, I just know it clicked open & closed & I could shoot cleaner & air through it when opened.

And I dont know anything about gotwings, he still could be a glory whore.  ;)

 

Thats a little surprising, but hey, if it works...:thumbsup:

 

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