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Broken Clevis

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I consider myself a lucky person. I've managed to survive being hit head on by a drunk driver, and, perhaps more impressively, survived a neurotoxin attack while serving in the military. That said, I sometimes think I might have used up all my luck (can't tell, the gauge is never accurate) and so I tend to be over cautious on things these days.

Anyway, a reputable mechanic was doing a once over on my bike and I basically told him I wanted it to be safe. The suspension was shot (used bike I recently purchased) and so I told him to go ahead and redo it so that it would be safe. When it was done he told me the clevis was still broke but would be fine for the type of riding I do (not really racing, though I do ride the local mx tracks and some tough trails).

I'm no mechanic (hence the reason I pay someone else to work on my bike) but I just can't fathom how that clevis being anything less than 100% is not an issue, though this mechanic's reputation is immaculate (really, I can't say enough about how respected he is, and he's a nice guy to boot). So, before I get worked up about this stupid part, can someone explain to me why this is or is not a legitimate issue?

Thanks in advance :banana:

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First of all, thank you for your service to our country!

Secondly, broken parts are NEVER okay! What kind of bike? I wouldn't ride the bike until the part is fixed. Let me know if I can help.

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First of all, thank you for your service to our country!

Secondly, broken parts are NEVER okay! What kind of bike? I wouldn't ride the bike until the part is fixed. Let me know if I can help.

I second that and I need to say it again, THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE TO OUR COUNTRY! I never served so I feel like I am just borrowing mine time here from the people who have, Thanks again.

What clevis are you talking about, rear brake? I would have your man explain it to you. Add some pictures if you can and we can be of more help.

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Thanks for the replies everyone. The part I'm referring to is the clevis on the rear shock of a CR250, like this:

2q3p3b5.jpg

That is not the actual part, just a pic of one I snagged from the net (here: http://www.blazeofgloryoffroad.com/2010/01/how-to-rebuild-dirt-bike-rear-shock.html). However, looking at how this attaches the shock to the bike, it seems that having it 100% functional would be the best option. Bike is actually still in the shop waiting for another part to come in and I'm waiting for a call back from him on this issue, which is why I wanted to get educated a bit about it before speaking with him.

That said, I don't know exactly in what manner it is "broke," but when it comes to a solid chunk of metal, I'm not really sure how many different degrees of "broke" you can really have, lol. Also, as far as I understand, the bearings were replaced with the shock service. I've found that, at least with the Pivot Works shock bearing kits, a new clevis is included with the kit if the bike uses one (http://www.motosport.com/dirtbike/product/PIVOT-WORKS-SHOCK-BEARING-KIT/?prodId=55132&). Is this typical or atypical of bearing kits to include a new clevis?

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I'd definitely either get a new one if its broke, or have a SKILLED tig welder weld it back up

I wouldn't risk it on a non skilled tig welder though, anyone can lay a bead down with a tig, only few can do the job properly and have it hold up :banana:

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yeah, it seems that for the 40 bucks, I'd just as soon have a new one, especially since I'm already $1300 and 12 days in the shop into the ordeal :-( Live and learn I guess. Just getting back into it after many years, it's lucky that I've had so many other good experiences lately with companies like Cycle Gear and Omega braces, otherwise this experience might well have driven me right back out the door.

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No - you don't get a clevis with the bearing kit. Look at the ad again. All you get is the parts that are on the card (bearings and seals).

Any idea of how it broke? That has to be addressed as well, so it doesn't happen again.

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yep, you're right, I did misread that. With regard to how it broke, basically neglect on the part of the previous owner, as the suspension had apparently never been serviced. Though again, all that's rather speculative as I've been calling the mechanic for two days now with no answer and no return calls. One way or another I guess I'm going to shop on Monday and loading the bike up and bringing it home, even if it's in buckets. That will be nearly a week after it was promised to be ready :-(

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