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Mono grade oil or multi grade oil???

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For breaking in a motor a non viscosity oil is ok to use since you will be changing it in an hour or less, but after break in go to a viscosity oil which will protect for a longer period than a non viscosity oil.

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There are tons of posts about oil that go for pages and pages and page. The only thing you're going to get out of it is a headache from reading so much. If you honed your cylinder properly and set your ring up right, just use a multi-grade, non synthetic motorcycle oil and not Wal-mart brand. It's a CRF100, not formula 1 motor. There's not a whole lot you can do to mess it up. A multi-weight oil contains a molecule that makes it act like it's thinner than it really is. The W in 10w-30 means winter, because a thinner oil flows better in cold temps. Not that I'm some oil export, but I've researched it a bit and watched a documentary on how they make motor oil on the discovery channel. Neat stuff.

Edited by socalxr

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But you got it bass ackwards. Multi-vis oil starts with a thin oil and viscosity improvers are added.

These are the things that wear out in oil causing it to thin out.

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But you got it bass ackwards. Multi-vis oil starts with a thin oil and viscosity improvers are added.

These are the things that wear out in oil causing it to thin out.

That's not the way some oil refinery explained it, but like I said I no expert. If you can make heads or tails out of this, it might help. http://wiki.seloc.org/a/Oil_Labelling_Explained

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My thoughts are you need a high zinc package this is for high loads.You need this for the cam and tranny.Now mostly available in off road use oil like vavoline racing VR1 you choose the weight.

Bob

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When selecting an oil for a wet clutch application make sure it doesn’t contain moly. The oil should not say “Energy Conserving” any where on the bottle. There are some 10W-30 oils that are energy conserving (almost all automotive 5W-30 oils are). The moly in energy conserving oils can cause the clutch to slip.

If you have some time to waste (very long thread) check out this thread on oil, the one poster (Georgecls, now deceased) was an oil engineer and presented some very good points about oil:

http://www.ducatimonster.org/forums/tech/122020-motor-oil.html

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