Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Which bike is eaiser to start XR600R XR650R

Recommended Posts

Please only info from people who have recently had experience starting both a Honda XR600R and Honda XR650R. I am trying to decide which would make a better dual sport with emphisis on forest roading and no Interstate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think they are about the same and really once you learn the correct way. You can even start them with sandals on . When I first bought my first xr650r i spent two hours teaching my self how to start it. It just so happens-the way i taught my self is the same way implied here on thumper talk. I would not buy one over the other because of how easy it is to start. On these bikes when jetted/uncorked right either one is at most a 3 kick starting procedure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They're about the same, I like how easy my 650R starts but you have to get the technique down. Roll it past TDC a fuzz and and follow through with a healthly kick and it starts the first kick everytime that way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My son and I have had 4 XR600s and a 650R is currently in his garage. Both bikes are easy to start, just about eqaually so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea, kickstarting should be a breeze. When the bike is cold, maybe a few kicks - first kick when it's warm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 96 XR600R is first kick every time when it's warm. If it's been sitting in the garage for a week it's maybe 10 kicks. It has an Edelbrock Quicksilver pumper carb which I'm not sure is worth a shit and my cold starting routine probably isn't perfect. But once it's warm, first kick, every time, very easy too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My 96 XR600R is first kick every time when it's warm. If it's been sitting in the garage for a week it's maybe 10 kicks. It has an Edelbrock Quicksilver pumper carb which I'm not sure is worth a shit and my cold starting routine probably isn't perfect. But once it's warm, first kick, every time, very easy too.

If you Edelbrock is tuned properly, a few twists of the throttle before kicking should let it light off easily when cold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you Edelbrock is tuned properly, a few twists of the throttle before kicking should let it light off easily when cold.

So kick it through with the manual decomp a few times, whack the throttle a couple times, then kick it.......get some fuel in the chamber basically.

Yeah, the Eddy seems to be tuned fine. No decel popping, good throttle response, etc, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NONE of these bikes are hard to start when everything is in order. My 600 takes three kicks to start when it hasn't been run for some time and one kick when warm or cooled off. My father's '84 XL600 is the same way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NONE of these bikes are hard to start when everything is in order. My 600 takes three kicks to start when it hasn't been run for some time and one kick when warm or cooled off. My father's '84 XL600 is the same way.

Agreed mine too(XR600R)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only thing I would add here is that removing the 'suspect' backfire baffle from the 650R chokeplate makes cold starting a real PITA so if you find one you're thinking of buying and this is the case, chances are it's had this mod.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if jetted correctly, they can both be started in sandals in one kick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
if jetted correctly, they can both be started in sandals in one kick.

From hot, definately. I have no problem. Removing the small backfire plate you're effectively disabling full choke by allowing more air through. If it starts from cold with no choke it's jetted too rich.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree starting is about the same between my 94' 600 and my 00'650 (both R ) but the 600 is so much lighter and smaller it stomps the 650 in the tight stuff. The 650 is my interstate bike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 1997 XR600R used to be hard to start, but after I dismantled and thoroughly cleaned the carb, it starts in 3 HARD kicks cold. And one good kick when its warm, and when its hot, it starts very easy.

OH! and I got my bike specifically for riding Forest Service roads, and trails, here in the mountains of Idaho. I also ride it on the highway, on my way to dirt, and it feels perfectly safe and handles just fine up to 75 on dry pavement, and this is with MX knobbies. I must say, I couldn't ask for a more perfect bike for my taste. Lotsa torque, and pretty dang fast once she gets rolling. Can't wait to get it out in the open desert this spring!! I don't think its hard to handle at all, but I'm 6'3" and not exactly skinny.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My 1997 XR600R used to be hard to start, but after I dismantled and thoroughly cleaned the carb, it starts in 3 HARD kicks cold. And one good kick when its warm, and when its hot, it starts very easy.

OH! and I got my bike specifically for riding Forest Service roads, and trails, here in the mountains of Idaho. I also ride it on the highway, on my way to dirt, and it feels perfectly safe and handles just fine up to 75 on dry pavement, and this is with MX knobbies. I must say, I couldn't ask for a more perfect bike for my taste. Lotsa torque, and pretty dang fast once she gets rolling. Can't wait to get it out in the open desert this spring!! I don't think its hard to handle at all, but I'm 6'3" and not exactly skinny.

The six's are easy its that BRP that starts giving me arm pump after five miles of single track. But part of that might be the 40T sprocket or the seven gallon tank but it sure makes the 600 feel like a 250 when I swap

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×