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type of welder for issue

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Ok guys,,,I know this is a common discussion for our BRPs...

cs and drive shaft spline,,,

I've gotten away with approx..1000 miles by shimming,,,and realizing this

isn't going to last long....everything else in the case is working fine...

I don't want to crack it open until I have more reason to!

so when I go in search of a master welder to weld a new cs to an old

drive shaft spline,,,,

What type of welder do you guys recommend? Arc,,,Mig...etc???

yes I understand the penetration and "bead" is the key to a long life...

My concern is choosing the method that will reduce the risk of a

poorly amped and/or laid bead????

I love my xr600r and I would rather sacrifice replacing chains until

the clutch, trans, decomp,cam, topend, etc also need to be replaced

In otherwords,,,yes I'm cheap!

thanks TTers :banana:

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I'd think you could get away with using a 110 volt box wirefeed welder. Something like the inexpensive Lincoln weld pak 3200 you buy at Home Depot would be fine. It's good up to a thickness of 5/16.

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It won't hold up.

What won't, a 110v welder, or a weld period?

Edited by MountainBear

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IMO, 5/16" is overly optimistic for a 90 amp wire welder. I have used a Weld Pak 100 MIG, which I'm pretty sure is the exact same as the 3200HD, on ~0.130" wall mild steel tube and it had a hard time. 520 sprockets are almost twice that thick.

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You're not going to be welding through the entire thickness of the sprocket though.

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yes I'm cheap!

$60 for a gasket set and $100 for the shaft... A weekend of wrenching... done!

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In an ideal world you would use a TIG welder and put a nice even slow perfect penetrated bead all the way around the shaft. A 110 V MIG should work fine. I have welded 1/4 inch steel with my cheapo Astro 110 V step Mig machine. Just made extra passes to make up for the lack of penetration. You can probably find a cheap used one ready to go on craigslist. A lot of people buy 110 wire outfits with big dreams of fabricating everything and then never use them.

Good luck!

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Mine looked like a plain old stick/arc rig did the trick. It held up fine... was a :banana: to get off... wasn't going anywhere :lol:

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What won't, a 110v welder, or a weld period?

I was thinking the weld would break from the tq. of the 650L, maybe that's because I'm a crappy welder.

A pro that knows how to weld might say different, I'm no pro..

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I have split the cases only once. Is it hard? no.

There are a few places where having the right tool or advice helps a lot. I would recommend splitting the cases and replacing it properly. If you plan the job and have the correct tools, you can do this job at home in your garage.

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I was thinking the weld would break from the tq. of the 650L, maybe that's because I'm a crappy welder.

A pro that knows how to weld might say different, I'm no pro..

I think it depends on how much spline is left on the shaft. If the shaft is stripped clean, then the weld would have to handle all of the torque; however, if there is till some spline left for the sprocket to engage, the weld simply has to hold the sprocket tightly pressed into the splines. Mine still had some spline left so the

BS.jpg

weld did the trick :lol:

A picture of the countershaft would be most helpful. Newbie... can you make that happen?:banana:

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I was thinking the weld would break from the tq. of the 650L, maybe that's because I'm a crappy welder.

A pro that knows how to weld might say different, I'm no pro..

No,,i think you`re right,i`ve done a pile of welding,and a 90 amp machine isn`t likely going to get enough penetration if the splines are completely stripped.a higher amp 220v mig would though...but personally i`d use a stick welder:thumbsup:

Caution though..you do not want to put your ground lead on anything but that CS shaft,,if you ground it to the motor/frame the power path goes straight through the roller bearings and can arc causing pitting and catastrophic failure of the bearing...and yes,i`ve seen a lot of bearing failures do to this..usually a wheel bearing..as the dumb a$$es use a wheel stud to clamp their ground lead to...:banana::banghead:

B

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No,,i think you`re right,i`ve done a pile of welding,and a 90 amp machine isn`t likely going to get enough penetration if the splines are completely stripped.a higher amp 220v mig would though...but personally i`d use a stick welder:thumbsup:

Caution though..you do not want to put your ground lead on anything but that CS shaft,,if you ground it to the motor/frame the power path goes straight through the roller bearings and can arc causing pitting and catastrophic failure of the bearing...and yes,i`ve seen a lot of bearing failures do to this..usually a wheel bearing..as the dumb a$$es use a wheel stud to clamp their ground lead to...:banana::banghead:

B

That's some good info you gave there..thanks.

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You don't need much penetration to hold that sprocket good and tight. A 110v Lincoln is more than enough. Guys use it to gusset their 4wd frames. A bigger welder is just overkill.

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Caution though..you do not want to put your ground lead on anything but that CS shaft,,if you ground it to the motor/frame the power path goes straight through the roller bearings and can arc causing pitting and catastrophic failure of the bearing...and yes,i`ve seen a lot of bearing failures do to this..usually a wheel bearing..as the dumb a$$es use a wheel stud to clamp their ground lead to...:lol::banghead:

I totally forgot about that little caveat with big consequences. :banana:

It can also arc across the gear teeth and pit them as well. Imagine trying delay the inevitable CS replacement only to discover a little while later that you caused about 10x more damage to the engine. :banana:

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also disconnect the battery and unplug the cdi box you don't want to fry that,I would wire weld that tig produces to much heat and that shaft is probably hardened

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Probably ought to put some soaking wet rags behind the sprocket to keep the seals from overheating. I welded a MT bike sprocket once and would weld a little then quench before the heat would transfer into the bottom bracket.

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A 110v Mig will do the job just fine and should burn into it at least 1/8 inch. The rags are a great idea since you have a seal back there too.

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Thanks to all your inputs...I had thought of the wet rags trick,,not about the

grounding lead and disconnecting the CDI...I know the parts are cheap but my wrenching

experience stops after adjusting the valves!..Maybe I'll try it "someday"

after I get it welded I will post the results,,,

TTers are the best :banana:

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