Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

How sore do you shoot for?

Recommended Posts

In your strength training. I'm not talking the super soreness you feel when you first start, but after you've gotten into the groove. Now I'm choosing weights hard enough for the rep amount I pick so that the last few reps are a struggle, which results in shaky legs or I can't lift my arms, there is definate fatigue, but not disabling fatigue, and after a day there is definate soreness(enough to link it to a certain muscle), but it fades pretty fast and I'm ready to go next time I work that group. I end up with a rotating soreness, something is always sore(but again, not debilitating).

So, I feel when I work to this result of soreness, my strength seems to progress pretty well, but not too fast for injury.

I was curious because I've seen some threads asking "how sore I should be" and different answers from "you're crawling to the bathroom and hurl before you get there" to "don't overdo it and you'll get used to the workout(which you keep doing at the same exertion for a few months then bump up because THEN you've hit a plateau...)"

SO, how much soreness do you feel is just right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am usually sore for 2 days after I work out a muscle group. Like you said, not a hurt, just to let you know that some work was done. Leg days are the worst. I have a hard time on steps for a few days after that workout.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been thinking the same thing lately. I have been feeling like if I have been working with the same weight for a week or two and the next day soreness is getting less or almost not there at all then it's time to increase the weight.

Doesn't a good day of soreness give you that feeling of accomplishment???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, a good day to day-and-a-half is good for me. I think the reason you hear so much about soreness is when new people sign up for "personal training" or start a gym membership on their own, they overwork (or get overworked by a "trainer")the first week. Then, they can't get out of bed the next day, get discouraged and quit.

If you are a experienced, you know to keep it simple at first to get a good baseline muscle memory. Then, the soreness is good and manageable because you tore down the muscle correctly so it will build back stronger.

I also use negatives at the end of a set to push thru a plateau...works great but you usually need a good spotter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I shoot for no soreness. Being 'sore' (not just fatigued) to me means I'm not very well trained.

I typically only get soreness if I have slacked off of lifting for a few weeks. If i'm in shape, even working out to complete muscle failure causes no soreness the following day, just tiredness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting. I have never thought about trying to reach a certain level of soreness. I have always thought about trying to improve on my last work out. I think that are so many factors in how sore one gets after a workout. How well did you warm up, what did you eat that day, how well did you cool down?

I too would tend to agree that once a muscle or muscle group is in shape, it is hard to get that sore again. Unless you change something. ie If you can bench press 200 lbs for 3 sets of 10 reps and the next work out you try and do the same with 100lb dumbells, you are going to be in for a big suprise. Not to mention very sore. That has been my experience anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too would tend to agree that once a muscle or muscle group is in shape, it is hard to get that sore again. Unless you change something. ie If you can bench press 200 lbs for 3 sets of 10 reps and the next work out you try and do the same with 100lb dumbells, you are going to be in for a big suprise. Not to mention very sore. That has been my experience anyway.

That's because you are recruiting more "stabilizer" muscles when you use dumbbells...which is why everyone preaches "free weights work faster to build muscle." You use more muscles and muscle groups when the weight has to be balanced by you instead of the structure bolted to the floor.

Another good way to push thru a plateau...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plushpuppy,

As a bodybuilder, as well as a desert racer, I'm extremely familiar with the soreness involved with strength training. 2-3 days of diminishing soreness is about right . There are some other things to consider in your recovery time as well. First & foremost, eat quality protein within 1 hour of completing your workout. Boneless, skinless chicken breast or a quality muscle building supplement will be just fine. Your muscles are in an anabolic state for around an hour after heavy lifting and utilize the protein best during this period. Also, drink PLENTY of water...both during your workout and after. I live in Las Vegas, and drink, at the very minimum, 1 gallon of water each and every day. This helps push out the acid induced during workouts, lubricates your joints to protect against injury, as well as speeding recovery. As far as "plateauing"...it happens to every body builder out there. I change my routine every 3 weeks to continue to keep my muscles from getting used to the work. Just increasing weight doesn't work forever. Change up the exercises you do for a particular muscle group every 3 weeks or so. Also, change the sequence in which you do your exercises. If you do, lets say, dumbbell curls, then hammer curls, then preacher curls on arm day, reverse the sequence the next time you do arms. Also, don't only train for size...strength "endurance" is just as important as one rep strength for us motorcycle riders, at least in motocross or off road disciplines. As a starting point, take 85% of your 1-rep max weight, and do 10 sets of 3-5 reps, with 30 second intervals between sets. This will "shock" your muscles b/c they're not used to this level of work yet. You also wont "grow bigger", but you'll begin to strengthen the muscle fibers so that you don't fatigue during your races as much, or as fast. There are countless other details involved in strength training and muscle building...the kind of food your eating, when your eating it, the exercises your performing, what time of the day your working out...and the list goes on & on. If you would like more info, contact me & I'd be glad to help any way I can. Safe training & Happy Riding!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks everyone--the thought just came to me is there would be a good level of soreness that would tell you that you've hit stuff just right. I understand the super soreness that comes from doing something new(either upping effort or starting new), and also the general all over fatigue kind of soreness, and that when you're used to working out at a certain level you don't get very sore. Anyways, just was wondering if anyone else paid attention to how sore they do or dont' get along the way.

does "negative" mean when you let the weight go back to starting position really slow?

I'm doing this for strength and endurance foremost(and to make future old woman bonz of steel), not bodybuilding(while I appreciate other people's accomplishments in that, I get more personal jollies from the "performance" side). I use free weights and switch around between the bar and dumbbells.

I have seen a difference in the last few weeks where I do things hard enough(like with upper body) that I can't lift a glass of water afterwards kinda like Llama sez(arms feel like noodles), but I don't get sore the next day.

GCannon--my favorite tiredness is at the end of an all day of trailriding, after I've made dinner and chopped wood and made fire and washed the dishes and went for a twilight/night ride and cleaned the trailer and my air filter and made a cherry cake in the dutch oven and fetched beer for everyone and then I fall down by the camp fire and don't move for awhile and look at the stars and listen to the campfire BS...that IS the best!! then waking up in the morning to do it again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GCannon--my favorite tiredness is at the end of an all day of trailriding, after I've made dinner and chopped wood and made fire and washed the dishes and went for a twilight/night ride and cleaned the trailer and my air filter and made a cherry cake in the dutch oven and fetched beer for everyone and then I fall down by the camp fire and don't move for awhile and look at the stars and listen to the campfire BS...that IS the best!! then waking up in the morning to do it again!

Amen Sister! I like how you roll. Don't forget that last "Workout" right before you go to sleep after a day like that. Kinda like the cherry on top of the whip cream on top of the cherry cake!:banana:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I shoot for no soreness. Being 'sore' (not just fatigued) to me means I'm not very well trained.

I typically only get soreness if I have slacked off of lifting for a few weeks. If i'm in shape, even working out to complete muscle failure causes no soreness the following day, just tiredness.

I used to be like this but I also did not get any stronger or more fit during that time. If you don't get sore, your muscles are used to the exercise and it's time to work them another way to keep them growing. Doing the same routines even if adding weight every now and then doesn't really work that well. IMHO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thanks everyone--the thought just came to me is there would be a good level of soreness that would tell you that you've hit stuff just right. I understand the super soreness that comes from doing something new(either upping effort or starting new), and also the general all over fatigue kind of soreness, and that when you're used to working out at a certain level you don't get very sore. Anyways, just was wondering if anyone else paid attention to how sore they do or dont' get along the way.

does "negative" mean when you let the weight go back to starting position really slow?

I'm doing this for strength and endurance foremost(and to make future old woman bonz of steel), not bodybuilding(while I appreciate other people's accomplishments in that, I get more personal jollies from the "performance" side). I use free weights and switch around between the bar and dumbbells.

I have seen a difference in the last few weeks where I do things hard enough(like with upper body) that I can't lift a glass of water afterwards kinda like Llama sez(arms feel like noodles), but I don't get sore the next day.

GCannon--my favorite tiredness is at the end of an all day of trailriding, after I've made dinner and chopped wood and made fire and washed the dishes and went for a twilight/night ride and cleaned the trailer and my air filter and made a cherry cake in the dutch oven and fetched beer for everyone and then I fall down by the camp fire and don't move for awhile and look at the stars and listen to the campfire BS...that IS the best!! then waking up in the morning to do it again!

yup, negative is the 'return' motion...the 'down' motion when you are bench-pressing. If you do these slowly and have a spotter help you back to the extended postion, you can get a major burn going!

I have heard of taking asprin after a workout to ease the DOMS...might be some research out there.

I said it before but tons if info at T-Nation or Figure Athlete.com.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Amen Sister! I like how you roll. Don't forget that last "Workout" right before you go to sleep after a day like that. Kinda like the cherry on top of the whip cream on top of the cherry cake!:lol:

haha, if I was in Thumpettes I woulda included that :banana: (my hubby doesn't look in there) (oops, now I'm in trouble) (but I mean fun trouble)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if u dont get sore u didnt train hard enough..listen to your body..it will tell u ea. workout when u have had enough..by all means never and i mean never over train..this will only invite ijury to tendon and your ligaments...if u are still tender say in your chest area, and u are suppose to bench this day...dont...never train when u are sore or even tender...allow the myro fibers to heal..they have to or u just wont gain...it is better to walk away from the dinner table hungry than full...the same is for wieghtlifting..listen to your body..train hard and heavy,good form,sleep 8 plus hours and eat right..muscles need nitrogen...ie; protein...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×