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Lock nut on valve stem


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LeaningTower.jpg

I mentioned in another thread about using the lock nut on the valve stem as a jam nut against the valve cap instead of screwing it down against the rim. But this time it might have saved me from ripping a stem out of a tube so I thought it was worth a thread of its own.

As you can see from the picture, my tire started slipping and I got a leaning-tower valve stem. If I would have kept the lock nut up against the rim, I might not have noticed the stem leaning and kept on riding.

  • The tire is an MT21 on the front of a DRZ without a rim lock.
  • When this happened I was running 12 PSI and riding sand washes and some whoops.
  • Usually I run 15 PSI both street and dirt and I've never had a problem before.
  • The rear tire was fine, but it had a rim lock.

Hopefully this saves someone from ripping a stem out of a tube.

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LeaningTower.jpg

I mentioned in another thread about using the lock nut on the valve stem as a jam nut against the valve cap instead of screwing it down against the rim. But this time it might have saved me from ripping a stem out of a tube so I thought it was worth a thread of its own.

As you can see from the picture, my tire started slipping and I got a leaning-tower valve stem. If I would have kept the lock nut up against the rim, I might not have noticed the stem leaning and kept on riding.

  • The tire is an MT21 on the front of a DRZ without a rim lock.
  • When this happened I was running 12 PSI and riding sand washes and some whoops.
  • Usually I run 15 PSI both street and dirt and I've never had a problem before.
  • The rear tire was fine, but it had a rim lock.

Hopefully this saves someone from ripping a stem out of a tube.

Rim Locks Are Our FRiends...

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Rim Locks Are Our FRiends...

Run 15psi or higher, and you don't need them. I've been running without rimlocks on dual sports for several years and haven't ripped a tube (std. tubes) or wanted for lower pressures. Sometimes in the real bad slop I'd like a bit more grip, but 99% of the time on the trails I never notice the difference between 18psi and 10....and I don't have balance issues, or the PITA of the rimlock on changes, etc.

Personal choice, like everything else, but I think you can get along fine without them.

I do, like the OP, keep the lock nut away from the rim. ­čĹŹ

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cool - I also keep the lock nut against the valve cap instead of the rim for the reasons mentioned. Lots of folks scratch their head over that setup when they notice: "hey man, your lock nut is loose!?"...

FWIW, I also use rim locks. Lots of insurance is a good thing!

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I've always done the same thing - nut up against the cap, front and rear. I DO use rim locks on both ends and my bike gets squirrley with more than 16 to 18 lb. in the rear. I prefer to set pressure dictated by conditions and handling only.

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True you won't need the rim lock when there is pressure in the tire, but with a flat it just may save you hide and keep the flat tire working.

I take the nut completely off, and keep one in the tool kit for when I want to hold the stem through the rim during a tire change.

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True you won't need the rim lock when there is pressure in the tire, but with a flat it just may save you hide and keep the flat tire working.

I'm curious how a rimlock would have any advantage with a flat? I've gone flat on both rim lock tires and non, and didn't see any appreciable difference in handling or what happened to the tire. A rimlock trying to hold a deflated tube doesn't have anything to press against, afterall.

Not trying to start a fight, just trying to understand your statement.

If you run a tire with a really stiff sidewall, btw, you can ride on a flat without a rimlock...that's one thing I can tell you with some certainty. Tire choice and rim design matter almost as much as whether or not you're running RL's.

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Without the rimlock the rim is free to spin in the tire and you loose braking and any traction once the tire comes unseated from the rim. The tire more than likely will still unseat all around the rimlock, but it gives a bit more control before that happens. A rimlocks secures the bead of the tire, at the rimlock, against the rim regardless of airpressure, mechanically. If you don't believe it just try and remove the tire with the rimlock secured down.

Edited by jussenuf
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Without the rimlock the rim is free to spin in the tire and you loose braking and any traction once the tire comes unseated from the rim. The tire more than likely will still unseat even with one rimlock, but it gives a bit more control before that happens.

yep. it's alot harder to spin a tire on the rim, when running a rimlock, when you're riding 10 miles out on a pinch flat.

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Without the rimlock the rim is free to spin in the tire and you loose braking and any traction once the tire comes unseated from the rim. The tire more than likely will still unseat all around the rimlock, but it gives a bit more control before that happens. A rimlocks secures the bead of the tire, at the rimlock, against the rim regardless of airpressure, mechanically. If you don't believe it just try and remove the tire with the rimlock secured down.
'

Ok, gotcha.

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