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Loft wheel, looping out

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Ok, so im still looping out once in a while. I ate shit big time today and thank god it was in the sand for me and teh bikes sake.

Im covering the clutch, and rear brake, preload, lean back but it seems once the real magic starts to happen with the traction and weel going up, it is like tryin to prevent from sliding back down hill, while the bike is charging up hill. All my body momentum is going back, and i cant get the brake or clutch. Eventually i let the whole thing go and every thing hits the earth.

Is this some thing that just happens from time to time or is there any other tricks and tips that will help? My wrists are sore, and crushed the visor on my helmet. I dont need to be a super hero stunt wheelie guy, i just want to get the front wheel around a foot of the ground and be able to hold on when the rear hits the obstacle im lofting over(log, rock ledge, what ever).

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What are you riding? Bike, conditions of ground, track? woods? You mentioned wheelies. are you skilled at this particular scenario and having some new troubles?

I had the same problems i think... -BIG DAN:thumbsup:

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What are you riding? Bike, conditions of ground, track? woods? You mentioned wheelies. are you skilled at this particular scenario and having some new troubles?

I had the same problems i think... -BIG DAN:thumbsup:

STock crf250x, woods scenerio, novice rider, cant really wheelie (no do i need to) but more of an obstacle clearing skill im after. i was on sand today, thankfully....

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Sorry, read your post again... STUPID AMERICANS. You are talking about wheelies. Ok, I was having that problem too.

Sit in the middle of your seat instead of the back. Also, as it rolls up your feet must move over the front of your pegs, which becomes the top of the peg. Kinda diagonal. Check my avatar, I think my feet are pictured in street shoes to show the dramatic rolling over.

Also, I do an opposite "push-up" to maintain my straight upright positioning.

-BIG DAN:thumbsup:

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STock crf250x, woods scenerio, novice rider, cant really wheelie (no do i need to) but more of an obstacle clearing skill im after. i was on sand today, thankfully....

I think you definitely need to get very comfortable lifting the front to BEFORE balance point. No need to hold some rediculous wheelie across a field. Although my avatar shows that it's cool anyways. Just get over a big log and move on. Helps with muddy washout also. Lift the front and gas through. -BIG DAN:thumbsup:

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Also, I do an opposite "push-up" to maintain my straight upright positioning.

-BIG DAN:thumbsup:

This push-up keeps my body upright perpindicular to the ground. You shouldn't try to stand up wheelie while a novice. I would get super familiar with sitdown pop-up and stand, as you cross the obstacle, to remove the weight from the rear. -BIG DAN:thumbsup:

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First start by doing slow 1st gear sitting wheelies. Do a little at a time, pop the clutch and bend your arms as it comes up, don't just lean back with your arms strait out. You will loop if you don't have your arms bent. Also, lean forward as the bike comes up. Once you can do a decent wheelie sitting then try to do it standing.

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Thanks guys, i think i was screwing up my arm position and having them pretty straight.

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Search "wheelies the final chapter" do all of the practices. Regardless if you want to know how to wheelie, lofting the wheel in a controled fashion is essential for offroad riding. I've got alot to learn but I think this is the best write up I've seen. Good luck.

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I am not a pro by any means, but here is how I got over the fear of looping out on my 650l.

The way I saw it was in order to find the balance point, I would have to go over backwards - that is unacceptable on a 650 and being 35 years old with a full time job.

So.... I threw a strap through the fron wheel and over a rafter in my garage; tied the bike off at the sides so it could not rotate; and lifted the front wheel with the strap until the bike was at the balance point.

Then, I was able to climb aboard and teeter back and forth at the balance point without the worry of moving. I had plenty of time to think about where my feet were placed, and plenty of time to get used to the "pitch attitude" of the bike at the balance point.

I was terrified of going over backwards - still am - but I learned where the balance point is by casually sitting on the raised bike. After the first couple sessions i am riding a wheelie for about half a block. The only limiting factor for me now is my clutch finger - i am out of shape and my arm hurts very quickly.

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Just gotta keep working on covering the brake

Wheelie in 1st gear on flat smooth ground to practice, just FORCE yourself to hit the brake when you bring it up. If you go out and repeatedly practice forcing yourself to ride the brake when you bring it up, then you eventually will get the hang of it.

You gotta get the gut instinct out of your head to jump off, and replace it with BRAKE!

The brake will always save you if you hit it soon enough 👍

Also it's a lot easier to clutch a wheelie up high FAST, then it is to power wheelie it up.. When you power wheelie, the bike comes up slow, and your on the power hard, so once you get it high in the air, your still on the power and it's easier to loop out! If you clutch it up, you give it a quick snap of the throttle, dump/slip the clutch, then let off the throttle as the bike comes up.. That way when you get near balance point, your not on the throttle very hard and you can control it easier🤣

edit: btw I've never EVER wrecked a wheelie on my sport bike where I ended up on my ass, I've bailed a few times but was going slow enough to land on my feet.. And also only looped my 150f once ever, and that was from doing 1 handed wheelies, and my left foot slipped and clicked the shifter up a gear..

If you learn to cover the rear brake you will pretty much never go back words. It could still happen, but your chances go down biiig time.

And once you learn the brake, you can hop on just about any bike and ride a nice wheelie.

It also helps to use a quad to learn the brake, that way you can set it back on the grab bar without wrecking, as well as not have to worry about side to side balance. Side to side balance gets a lot harder the closer to balance point you are

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^^^ +2:thumbsup:

Towlieeee is the wheelie master. I take everything he says about one wheel to heart. Force the rear brake at first and slowly learn to use it less and the wheelie gets easier and safer... -BIG DAN:thumbsup:

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This guy Has the rear brake action on video. Watch it carefully, He pulses as he rolls back. Look at his feet and body position. Great video. Short and sweet. -BIG DAN:thumbsup:

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One hand wheelies, wow...

but i think you guys are making this harder than this is.., if going over stuff ( lets say a log) you don't nessacarily need to do a complete wheelie over it. All you need to do is shift your weight to the back (while standing) just enough so the front tire will pop up a few inches off the ground with the application of throttle. Once the front tire makes contact with the log it will naturally go over it. The reason you should stand is so the bike will hinge on the pegs as your going over the log.

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One hand wheelies, wow...

but i think you guys are making this harder than this is.., if going over stuff ( lets say a log) you don't nessacarily need to do a complete wheelie over it.

Yeah, but when your bored and wanna have some fun, or show off for some friends, brake control comes in handy 👍

l3a3d90ec70dca8663afcd2zs4.jpg

^^^ +2:thumbsup:

Towlieeee is the wheelie master. I take everything he says about one wheel to heart.

haha thanks 🙂:ride:🤣

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One hand wheelies, wow...

but i think you guys are making this harder than this is.., if going over stuff ( lets say a log) you don't nessacarily need to do a complete wheelie over it. All you need to do is shift your weight to the back (while standing) just enough so the front tire will pop up a few inches off the ground with the application of throttle. Once the front tire makes contact with the log it will naturally go over it. The reason you should stand is so the bike will hinge on the pegs as your going over the log.

I agree, but i also have been in spots where i would like to get the wheel up hi enough to clear it, so my back wheel can get me right over some thing like a log, or rock face. Every one here is giving great tips, but a sit wheelie would not really work for this like you mentioned because it would be easier to get bucked. But it will train me to use the back brake and balance point. Im going back to the sand to try some more today, with all these tips.

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haha thanks🤣:ride:👍

Dude you taught me to wheelie, wether you knew it or not. Your vids and pictures say it all. My avatar is from me learning your methods from another thread. Now I can't keep the front on the ground. Even when I should.

If you can't get from sitting and standing while going over an obstical, then that's what you should work on. You need to be able to do a sitting loft to quick stand up all while manipulating the bike. SEAT TIME IS YOUR FRIEND. Towliee once said, "I don't have any pictures of me doing a standing wheelie on a dirtbike, except this one." Which turned out to have his foot on the swingarm. It's because the pegs are so far forward you have to hold your body weight up with your arms, which as you have found, is super hard to accomplish smoothly. -BIG DAN:thumbsup:

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onespot

IMO

situations requiring sit wheelies rarly come up in actually riding ... For going over stuff you don't need to find the balance point, just have the wheel high enough to go over the object. 90% of the time you don't need to have the front wheel completely clear the object. Sit wheelies and balance points are thing you shouldn't worry about until you have completely master simple pop wheelies to go over obstacles (which sholdnt take you that long).

this pro deffinitly is not sitting ( its kind of hard with out a seat.)

0801-OH-ObservedTrialsSeriesRds6-7-B-RyanYoung.jpg

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Hey onepunch,

When you accelerate (to loft the front wheel) the power will force you back towards the rear. To counteract this you need to get your weight as far forward as possible. How far depends on the bike and the amount of acceleration (slope & terrain/traction also factors).

Best technique is to maintain the "attack position" - elbows up and out, chin over the bars, standing on the pegs, knees slightly bent and always leading with your head. If you are not in the correct position on the bike you will have less control.

Try putting the bike up on a stand and practice moving backwards and forwards while standing in the attack position. As you move forward lead with your head and raise it up over the bars, as you move back push your rear back and lower your head. Practice sitting, always keeping your elbows up, and standing and moving around on the bike as if you were riding on your local track.

Have fun & good luck!

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