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How do you go faster into a berm without going higher on it?


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Hi.

I see people at my track go really fast into the berms then when I try to do it I feel my bike wanting to go higher and higher on the berm.

Once I actually went so high that my bike went over it and I bent my radiator back. 👍

Is there something I am not doing to keep my line low and not feel that push up the berm?

Cheers!

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yeah its hard to get my mind around it all. Especially after coming over the top of the berm. Now I am really cautious about it happening again.

Weighting the opposite peg (not on the side where you put your leg out) does that help? I dont understand how it does or even how to put more pressure on it.

Sometimes I change my position on the seat so Im sitting more on the upside of the bike when im turning too. I dono if it gives better traction or if im just chickening out of committing to fully leaning my bike over.

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wiplash433 is right on but I'm going to add put 1 finger on the front brake and very lightly drag the brake going through the turn. Dragging the front brake will effectively change the geometry of the chassis and squat the front also giving you more front end traction. With the front dropped down the bike will want to turn down the berm, and last but not least look where you want to go, never look at the spot that you know is trouble in the turn.

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In really banked turns where you can lean it over pretty far, I like to sit straight up and down on the bike and near the gas tank. I have found if I want to make myself lean over farther, I can hang my body over to the inside a little,which makes you lean more, then to keep it up you have to accelerate. This helped me with getting my speed up and leaning over farther.

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I suggest commitment. Rut freak us out and you beat yourself before you enter the corner. Also you may want to try counter stearing the bike. Want to go left, then apply a little preasure to the left grip and force the front wheel to the right. This will also reduce front wheel washout. Just an ideal that works for me.

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You have to keep the bike parallel with the angle of the berm. Which starts off smaller gradually increases depending on the turn to sometimes almost 90 degrees and then tapers off as you're exiting.

This requires that you imagine the specifically the rear tire riding a track around the berm similar to what you would think about a cage rider doing a loop looking like. Then you must execute this maneuver.

Stepping on the inside peg helps initiate a lean. Once you have the bike leaning over and tracking in a smooth arc heading for the berm (This smooth arc must be planned ahead for the entry all the way through the exit) then you have to think about when you plan to sit down and use momentum to defy gravity. This is usually just before the steepest angle in the berm. Be ready to almost leap forward onto the gas tank and keep an eye on the exit.

It helps me to cock my very upper body and head a little bit so that it is one of the few parts of the machine/ride meld that isn't at an angle with the berm. So that just that part of me is just up and down with the ground.

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Everyone is right here. Learn the technique of turning, leaning and making the turn first by practicing all the basics. Speed will come.

Additionally, a pro rider told me that a judicious amount of constantly applied front brake will keep you in the berm better. It is a matter of learning to operate more than one control of the bike simultaneously and is a very advanced technique requiring even more practice.

Even though you are on the gas, the front brake is applied in similar fashion as when you would "drag" the rear brake over a series of bumps to keep the back end of the motorcycle from kicking up as much. The only difference is the technique uses the front brake and helps you stay lower in the berm and keeps your front tire from going over the top.

If memory serves me correctly Gary Semics mentions this technique in either one of his vids or his absolute techniques of motocross book?

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Everyone is right here. Learn the technique of turning, leaning and making the turn first by practicing all the basics. Speed will come.

Additionally, a pro rider told me that a judicious amount of constantly applied front brake will keep you in the berm better. It is a matter of learning to operate more than one control of the bike simultaneously and is a very advanced technique requiring even more practice.

Even though you are on the gas, the front brake is applied in similar fashion as when you would "drag" the rear brake over a series of bumps to keep the back end of the motorcycle from kicking up as much. The only difference is the technique uses the front brake and helps you stay lower in the berm and keeps your front tire from going over the top.

If memory serves me correctly Gary Semics mentions this technique in either one of his vids or his absolute techniques of motocross book?

That helps soooooo much... to help keep the front end in a rut also. it's something I have to constantly remind myself to do, and when I do it always surprises me at how well it works...

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Look at the gp racers, when your going fast enough around a turn you just gotta pretty much hug the ground. I know ive gone way to fast into berms and thought crap this aint gonna end well but i managed to make myself think just lean towards the ground as hard as you can, despite instinct and it worked.

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after hitting the track today and putting all your tips into practise i found a major difference.

My skill level unfortunately is not good enough to do the front brake trick yet but i found that leaning the bike over more and keeping my vision ahead made a big difference.

I cant belive how much looking ahead changes ur thoughts and actions. It takes ur mind off exactly every move ur bike is doing and u just focus on getting to that next part of the track. Even works for jumping!

I think it is going to take a while for it to become second nature though. Becuase i had to keep reminding myself to do it.

Thanks again everyone for the tips! Thumpertalk is awesome 👍 haha

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The biggest benefit I have noticed from looking far ahead, is it makes me feel like I am already at that place on the track. This naturally makes me turn in that direction, and I also get back on the gas a lot quicker and harder. However, I have found looking far ahead (I'm talking really far, like 50 ft out of the turn) only really works that well in turns with no ruts. In turns with ruts, I have found that for me, looking at the end of the rut or just past it, is far enough to not be fixating on it, but allows me to track right through it very well.

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