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Fork Seals


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Where can I get a set of fork seal drivers so I do not have to take it to the local dealership, because they charge out the ass on labor rates $65 - $75 dollars and hour. I recently went to the dune and had my sand tire put on my wheel and it costs me $40 and that is not even the worst part they want another $40 to put the dirt tire back on. I just though I try to knock these fork seals out myself and save myself some money.

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ive done many fork seals and havne used one of those fancy 50$ seal drivers yet.

I went to the store, got a 6 inch piece of 1.5 inch PVC pipe, they didnt even charge me for it it was so cheap. cut it in half and use that. lightly tap it with a hammer, wrap tape or a rag around your fork tube to be extra safe you dont scratch it, and good to go. I think ive done 6 or 7 sets of forks this way and have had 0 problems.

if youre going to replace your fork seals, its also a very good idea to replace your fork bushings too.

and yes, thats how tires work.. its not a "pay once and receive free tire changes for ever" kind of thing. at my shop it costs 20-25$ per swap, no matter what tire or how long you had it on the bike for, or if you buy it from them.

the fork bullet can easily be replaces by using a ziploc freezer bag with some grease on it, this is just to bypass the sharp lip that the bushing sits on.

and the cartridge holder can easily be replaced by using a 13mm wrench. it might not be 13mm but youll figure it out 👍

if you work smart and carefully and use your head, you can save money. otherwise you need to fork out around 100$ for all the proper tools, which arent even necessary IMO. just something to consider.

Edited by Santan9
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My vote is to buy the proper tools. As stated, you can get everything cheap from Rocky Mtn or maybe eBay. You need to use the driver for the inner bushing and the seal and, for me, I'd don't like the idea of using a hammer.

If you have your owner's manual, it should show you the dimensions for the cartridge rod holder so you'll just need to buy the cap wrench and driver.

Best of luck. 👍

Here's a pretty good how-to:

http://www.dirtbikerider.co.uk/website_content/how_to/walkers_world/seal_surgery/index.html

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I second the proper tools. A mechanic is only as good as his tools. I tried the pvc thing. Spend the money you will be much happier.

I agree, the right tools and shop manual make for a better job. Using a real seal driver and cartridge holding tool are the way to go. A 32mm socket works perfectly on the base valve and can be gotten from Northern tool for $3. That 32mm socket also works on your rear axle nut. That's all the tools you need and you can acquire them for under $50. Money well spent.

A bench vise with softjaws is also a necessity when doing suspension work.

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Although the proper tools would be nice, it´s not always in the cards for us who do just 3-4 sets of forks each year.

Here is a guide I made on how to service the fork without special tools. You still need regular tools of course.

It´s easy as pie and cannot hurt or scratch anything if you follow this guide:

https://thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=863509&highlight=

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I've done over 15-20 sets of forks for dirt bikes and street bikes, never had a set leak using OEM seals and PVC to drive them

the proper tools would be nice, but I don't have the money to buy the proper tools for every size of forks. Not to mention, I only charge $50 off the bike for $70 on the bike for a complete fork rebuild 👍

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i hope you paid them to do your tire cause you were to lazy to do it yourself . if you cant change a tire i dont think you should try fork seals ...

hmm, ive never changed a tire, and assume it to be kinda touch (not mentally, but physically.. from what I hear) but ive done many fork seals!

maybe I should get some irons and try a tire sometime!

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hmm, ive never changed a tire, and assume it to be kinda touch (not mentally, but physically.. from what I hear) but ive done many fork seals!

maybe I should get some irons and try a tire sometime!

Tires are really easy once you have some practice, I spoon tires on everything from my 16/19" wheels on my 150f, 10" wheels for my crf50, and 17" street tires for my sport bike 👍

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I've done over 15-20 sets of forks for dirt bikes and street bikes, never had a set leak using OEM seals and PVC to drive them

yup. if you think about it, its all the same, you just need to be smarter than the fork seals. they dont know the difference between a metal slide hammer sliding up and down your fork tubes banging them into place, versus a plastic piece of PVC also banging them into the place, its all the same concept. I guess some people just have more money than brains though, to each their own I suppose.

Tires are really easy once you have some practice, I spoon tires on everything from my 16/19" wheels on my 150f, 10" wheels for my crf50, and 17" street tires for my sport bike 👍

yes I imagine theyre not that hard, I will definitely be looking into a tire changing stand (unless I can rig something up thats just as good for a fraction of the price) plus some tire irons (unless 24 inch flathead screwdrivers will work.... kidding!)🤣

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At some point, hopefully you'll figure out that good tools are worth it. When I was a kid, I made due with PVC, but when I grew up I learned that good tools, like a proper seal driver, are a good investment. It leaves me scratching my head when someone will spend $100's of dollars on dumb aftermarket junk for their bike, but try to skimp on good tools that will last a lifetime.

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