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2000 CR 250 good woods bike?


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Define "good"...

Most any bike can be made "good" for the woods/trails, some just take the rider getting used to whatever they wind up buying (whether or not other people think that it's "good").

Generally speaking, I like a 4T for woods/trails because I can l lug it, but a 250 2T works really well too and I rode those on single track for a long time. Shorten the bars, work on the gearing and suspension, add a flywheel weight if you need it and you should be good to go with that 250. Plus I think the 2000 CR250 is a green sticker bike (best to check it before buying the bike if that's important to you). ๐Ÿ‘

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The '00 is a good bike as far as "older" bikes go - actually a great bike for the year. The '01 was hands-down a better bike overall than the '00. The '02 suspension was better than the '01, but the motor sucked. '03 had a better engine setup than '02, so that was another "very good" year.

If you can find an '01 for a good price, I'd get that over the '00 if you want an overall "better" bike. That said, the '00 was a bit tamer on the hit and might actually be better for woods than an '01 - depending on how you ride.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The 03 will not be green sticker in california though. I ride a 97 cr250 and love it. I like the wheel spin and just geared it a bit lower for the tight stuff so i don't abuse the clutch. also aftermarket suspension is a good idea

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The '02 suspension was better than the '01, but the motor sucked. '03 had a better engine setup than '02, so that was another "very good" year.

Why do you say that the '02 "motor sucked"? What makes (made) the '03 motor better than the '02 motor?

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I noticed that you have an '02 and '03 in your garage. I suppose each person's experiences are different and clearly, my saying"'the '02 motor sucked" doesn't really explain anything, so here goes:

In '02, Honda changed to a case-reed engine (moved the reed placement from the cylinder to the crankcase; a great idea with a poor first-year execution, imo) with an electronically-controlled powervalve. Previous years used a mechanical PV. They missed the mark in tuning the thing and it wound up with a rather narrow powerband as compared to previous years. The result was that the bottom end felt soft and it had a wicked "hit" when you got on the pipe that was uncomfortable to ride (to me and many others; just google for it). Honda corrected the tuning in '03 in part by changing the reeds to an 8-petal design (4 petals per side). Huge difference in performance and rideability from '02 to '03 because of those tuning changes.

You may be able to swap '03 parts into an '02 engine, but I haven't done it and can't swear by it (like, "can you swap an '03 CDI into an '02 without changing the reeds?" Probably, but will it improve anything like that? No idea.). No doubt that you can get aftermarket parts to tune the beast. Anyway, here's a glimpse of what Honda did with the reeds (which I'm guessing you've already seen, but I'm posting it for everyone else to follow):

'01 6-petal reeds: http://shop.thumpertalk.com/oem.asp?partcategory=138766&manufacturer=3&category=3&year=2001&model=3272

'02 4-petal case-reeds: http://shop.thumpertalk.com/oem.asp?partcategory=138811&manufacturer=3&category=3&year=2002&model=3273

'03 8-petal case-reeds: http://shop.thumpertalk.com/oem.asp?partcategory=138852&manufacturer=3&category=3&year=2003&model=3274

More changes to the '03 are here (since you can't see them in the drawings):

"What's New?

Honda may have unveiled its third-generation twin-spar aluminum frame just last year, but it's obvious the guys in R&D weren't allowed to cash in all their accrued vacation hours following the '02 introduction (read as "After losing to Team Yamaha with the '02 bike, Honda R&D got the message... -Dave). This year's machine is full of innovations aimed at better power and a plusher ride. They started with different cylinder porting closer to the race team's specs for more top-end and overrev performance. The changed cylinder required an all-new exhaust pipe for optimum performance. To achieve better sealing at low speeds and smoother flow at high speeds, the exhaust port was reshaped and thickened. On the intake side, the reed valve has been altered to an eight-petal design, much like what comes in the CR500, for more responsive throttle response and low-end power. This year's air intake system offers a 10-degree straighter alignment with the engine, also targeted for stronger bottom-end and all-around performance. A new foam gasket between the airbox and airboot was added in an attempt to eliminate last year's Achilles' heel. The CDI's new mapping broadened power in all directions." - http://www.dirtrider.com/reviews/motocross/2003_honda_cr250r/index.html

Edited by davidl9999
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I have an 01' and I love it. There is very little difference between the 00 and 01. As a matter of fact most change to the 00 keihin carb like I did. I ride tight stuff mainly and my bike can be used for a wide variety of riding. The only thing that might not work perfectly is that you won't get a wide ratio gearing . That isn't that big of a deal but if you're picky that's about the only place that you may not find a clear perfect solution. I just rode today and I still love my 01. I had such a good time today riding.๐Ÿคฃ

Here's some local riding passed forward from Youtube . I think there's a 00 or 01 in front in tight stuff:

http://www.youtube.com/user/woodsrider117#p/a/f/1/JZN8Mbk79dw

I think an 00 works great for trail. Put the regular stuff like some have listed already and whatever more you feel is best.......๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ™‚ You can check my 01 in the TT garage for trail mod ideas. You don't have to go as far as I did. I got carried away as I kept upgrading and never bought a new bike since 01 except for a dualsport I just got a few months ago . Put a search on TT for cr 250 mods and there is a lot of info out there for you to access.

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I noticed that you have an '02 and '03 in your garage. I suppose each person's experiences are different and clearly, my saying"'the '02 motor sucked" doesn't really explain anything, so here goes:

In '02, Honda changed to a case-reed engine (moved the reed placement from the cylinder to the crankcase; a great idea with a poor first-year execution, imo) with an electronically-controlled powervalve. Previous years used a mechanical PV. They missed the mark in tuning the thing and it wound up with a rather narrow powerband as compared to previous years. The result was that the bottom end felt soft and it had a wicked "hit" when you got on the pipe that was uncomfortable to ride (to me and many others; just google for it). Honda corrected the tuning in '03 in part by changing the reeds to an 8-petal design (4 petals per side). Huge difference in performance and rideability from '02 to '03 because of those tuning changes.

You may be able to swap '03 parts into an '02 engine, but I haven't done it and can't swear by it (like, "can you swap an '03 CDI into an '02 without changing the reeds?" Probably, but will it improve anything like that? No idea.). No doubt that you can get aftermarket parts to tune the beast. Anyway, here's a glimpse of what Honda did with the reeds (which I'm guessing you've already seen, but I'm posting it for everyone else to follow):

'01 6-petal reeds: http://shop.thumpertalk.com/oem.asp?partcategory=138766&manufacturer=3&category=3&year=2001&model=3272

'02 4-petal case-reeds: http://shop.thumpertalk.com/oem.asp?partcategory=138811&manufacturer=3&category=3&year=2002&model=3273

'03 8-petal case-reeds: http://shop.thumpertalk.com/oem.asp?partcategory=138852&manufacturer=3&category=3&year=2003&model=3274

More changes to the '03 are here (since you can't see them in the drawings):

"What's New?

Honda may have unveiled its third-generation twin-spar aluminum frame just last year, but it's obvious the guys in R&D weren't allowed to cash in all their accrued vacation hours following the '02 introduction (read as "After losing to Team Yamaha with the '02 bike, Honda R&D got the message... -Dave). This year's machine is full of innovations aimed at better power and a plusher ride. They started with different cylinder porting closer to the race team's specs for more top-end and overrev performance. The changed cylinder required an all-new exhaust pipe for optimum performance. To achieve better sealing at low speeds and smoother flow at high speeds, the exhaust port was reshaped and thickened. On the intake side, the reed valve has been altered to an eight-petal design, much like what comes in the CR500, for more responsive throttle response and low-end power. This year's air intake system offers a 10-degree straighter alignment with the engine, also targeted for stronger bottom-end and all-around performance. A new foam gasket between the airbox and airboot was added in an attempt to eliminate last year's Achilles' heel. The CDI's new mapping broadened power in all directions." - http://www.dirtrider.com/reviews/motocross/2003_honda_cr250r/index.html

I've never ridden an '02 or an '03 bone stock. There's really not that much difference in the bikes that I have and they aren't modified all that much. I'd be willing to bet that the bikes would have to be put on a dyno to see most differences. Other than pipes and silencers about the only thing I've played with is gearing. I do have JD jet kits in both and had the squish corrected on the heads for both (and compression bumped up for 100 octane LL Av gas). The '03 has a little more bottom. Both hit pretty hard when they get on the pipe. The '02 is a tad faster on top end than the '03. The '02 GPS'd ~ 2 mph faster with bone stock engines and aftermarket (Fatty) pipes (before I had the squish set). My son races the '03 and he didn't care for the suspension on the '03 in stock form. I replaced it with stock '04 suspension and he likes it better now. A lot of the parts are interchangeable between the two years. I'm not sure why there are different pipes because I have run the '03 pipe on the '02 motor while it was in the '03 frame. Worked just fine. I've also run the '02 pipe on the '03 motor in the '03 frame. That worked just fine also. To put the '03 reed cage in an '02 all you need is the "carb insulator" and the reed cage assembly (and maybe the "tube" from the air cleaner?). When I put the '02 motor in the '03 frame I had to use the sub-frame assembly from the '02 because the angels weren't right to get the carb hooked up to the '03 air filter / sub-frame (I hope that part makes sense!).

Anyway.... all I'm saying is that the differences between the two are pretty minor.

I'd like to know what the port timing is on both. Feels to me like the '02 has higher ports than the '03. I never measured them when I had the motors apart. I'll have to do that next time.....

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  • 1 month later...

I loved my 00, you could chug it around like a 4t if you wanted to. Plus the engine was very dependable. Mine sat all winter long with no starting. Shook up the tank of gas it had in it the previous fall and in 2 kicks it was running like a champ.

I rode mine in the woods and it works out great.

Jason

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I ride a 00 as well and coming from a xr600 i was worried about being able to lug it and was immediately happy. I can still lug it around just like my 600. in fact i geared it higher(14 up front iirc) just so i can cruise easer and was happier with every gear. I was able to use each gear a little more instead of having to constantly having to shift. My only complaint is suspension even on full soft its still a little to harsh for my taste. I would say the key to being happy and making a smoker a good trail bike is JETTING(getting back to the 00's) my bike is jetted great. i lug it around all the time i get a little spooge but i have yet to foul a plug. And i run 30-1 on the oil. I might not have the top end of a leaned out 03, but for trail riding a 250 4stroke would be enough. a 250 smoker is just much more exciting to ride.

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I thought gold valves were for mx

I've heard something about taking out shims and they are better for woods, but I did not find any details on what shim stack to run

http://old.racetech.com/evalving/menu/searchdirt.asp

http://www.racetech.com/page.aspx?id=17&menuid=49

Racetech makes valving for whatever you want. That company is big time and has kits for many bikes on and off road. I initially started a setup for a 2000 cr 250 in the first link for you so you can see and follow through with the prompts to see . There's some good info on the racetech site especially for the cr 250 honda. ..so wander around and click buttons. I checked out the site early when getting my cr and used it for figuring out my spring rate front and back. I figured my spring rate for around 210 if I remember right. I am/was around 225-230 and the spring rates on the 2001 cr ran something like 195lbs stock for the front and around 175-180 lbs for the rear so the bike came a bit uneven spring wise. The bike still worked well stock after playing around with settings. Later when I had scouted some ebay half price gold valves sets I bought springs up front from racetech and rear springs from factory connection as they had a closer spring rate to the computation given on the racetech site . In the gold valve kit you log on to the racetech website and you get a code to get the best approximation to the type of riding you specify to the computation. (This code can only be downloaded for a limited period of time. I think it is something like 3 days so make sure your printer is working well or you will be hand writing the shim stacks and other info given...at least that is what it was like for me). If you are riding motocross/desert it is a much softer setting than say supercross. Since I already ride more technical slower trail I opted for 15lbs lighter than I really am in the computation. It is funny that my spring rates I was ordering were a bit higher than what I was already riding with..... Well bottom line is my mechanic/friend/dealer followed the computed numbers and installed the front and back springs and now my cr is more than golden. For me I felt like I was Roger Decoster, ( you can tell how old I am). I love my bike . It worked well stock but systematically adding mods as time goes by has worked exceptionally well and much more affordable than buy a new bike every couple of years. I feel way more comfortable and I can go way faster with way more confidence with much less effort. I think this bike is a cheater bike. My friends ride it and love it. I hope some of this info helps you. I think a 2000 cr 250 is a very good bike.๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿคฃ

Sorry no stock stack settings for trail riding. I would recommend just putting computed even rated springs and plain servicing front and back to start if you don't want to go the gold valve and much more expensive route. My dealer recommended not even that but just regular oil and seal changes/servicing more often as more affordable and better for my money. I just wanted to try it after hearing so much about how much better it was.

Edited by hawaiidirtrider
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http://old.racetech.com/evalving/menu/searchdirt.asp

http://www.racetech.com/page.aspx?id=17&menuid=49

Racetech makes valving for whatever you want. That company is big time and has kits for many bikes on and off road. I initially started a setup for a 2000 cr 250 in the first link for you so you can see and follow through with the prompts to see . There's some good info on the racetech site especially for the cr 250 honda. ..so wander around and click buttons. I checked out the site early when getting my cr and used it for figuring out my spring rate front and back. I figured my spring rate for around 210 if I remember right. I am/was around 225-230 and the spring rates on the 2001 cr ran something like 195lbs stock for the front and around 175-180 lbs for the rear so the bike came a bit uneven spring wise. The bike still worked well stock after playing around with settings. Later when I had scouted some ebay half price gold valves sets I bought springs up front from racetech and rear springs from factory connection as they had a closer spring rate to the computation given on the racetech site . In the gold valve kit you log on to the racetech website and you get a code to get the best approximation to the type of riding you specify to the computation. (This code can only be downloaded for a limited period of time. I think it is something like 3 days so make sure your printer is working well or you will be hand writing the shim stacks and other info given...at least that is what it was like for me). If you are riding motocross/desert it is a much softer setting than say supercross. Since I already ride more technical slower trail I opted for 15lbs lighter than I really am in the computation. It is funny that my spring rates I was ordering were a bit higher than what I was already riding with..... Well bottom line is my mechanic/friend/dealer followed the computed numbers and installed the front and back springs and now my cr is more than golden. For me I felt like I was Roger Decoster, ( you can tell how old I am). I love my bike . It worked well stock but systematically adding mods as time goes by has worked exceptionally well and much more affordable than buy a new bike every couple of years. I feel way more comfortable and I can go way faster with way more confidence with much less effort. I think this bike is a cheater bike. My friends ride it and love it. I hope some of this info helps you. I think a 2000 cr 250 is a very good bike.๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿคฃ

Sorry no stock stack settings for trail riding. I would recommend just putting computed even rated springs and plain servicing front and back to start if you don't want to go the gold valve and much more expensive route. My dealer recommended not even that but just regular oil and seal changes/servicing more often as more affordable and better for my money. I just wanted to try it after hearing so much about how much better it was.

thanks I think, that's a really long post that did not say anything about the actual valving. The bike already has the correct springs and obviously when I revalve it, the forks/shock will be fully serviced

I found a fork stack for woods I'm going to use, take 1 face shims off, and remove 1 each of 11, 13, 15 and 19 shims from the high speed valve

this should do what we want, and it's basically free

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thanks I think, that's a really long post that did not say anything about the actual valving. The bike already has the correct springs and obviously when I revalve it, the forks/shock will be fully serviced

I found a fork stack for woods I'm going to use, take 1 face shims off, and remove 1 each of 11, 13, 15 and 19 shims from the high speed valve

this should do what we want, and it's basically free

You mentioned you thought gold valves were only for motocross and they arent'. I just told you how my trail set up is since it's basicly the same bike as yours. The gold valves are a huge improvement and the passages are a lot larger than stock. That it's basicly free part makes sense. Free is good.

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  • 1 month later...

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