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Convince me to stick with ktm


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I am at my wits end with my 2001 250 exc. It has given me the most headaches out of everything I have ever owned and has been an absolute money pit. I'm just short of replacing all the major components of the bike. The opportunity has arrived for me to get rid of this and make the switch to a kx 450. I have always thought highly of ktm but I am less than impressed with the bike I have as it never seems to be running. If it came down to it I would prefer to keep my two smoker but I just dont want to keep running into problems. I now have to replace the crank seals on my bike and this has kept me from racing the upcoming weekend. As I said I love KTM and will always bleed orange but its becoming harder and harder to ride on my college budget with this bike. One last question. Would i feel underpowered on a 250 4banger coming off my exc?

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yes! you will feel very underpowered. Stop spending money in that bike its not worth it its obvously a lemon. part it out, and save up to buy a 2006+ KTM 2 stroke (newer the better) there totaly redesigned from the older years. I have a ktm 200xc and 78 hours on top end and nothing has broken other then reg maint. Get a 250-300 2 stroke or 450 4 banger

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how would i go about parting my bike out? is there really a big enough market for my used parts? i dont want to have half the bike sold and realize i have made a huge mistake. Also i have found two possibilities of new bikes if i can get a good amount for my parts http://maine.craigslist.org/mcy/1653156715.html

or

http://maine.craigslist.org/rvs/1643004256.html

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Life it too short to stick with a bike that is giving you problems. If it runs, sell it and get a new bike. How many people could be looking for 2001 bike parts??? I don't think you'd get much parting it out.

Is the suspension the same for a several year newer bike of the same model? Maybe you can swap suspensions onto your 'new' bike.

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Used bikes are always a crapshoot. We have one that has been a bit of a problem child also, but now we've fixed about everything possible on it, so after we put it back together (with replated top end, wooho) it better work, lol.

One thing to consider, even when things go drastically wrong, a 2-stroke is cheaper to fix, and more reasonable for you to do it yourself. I've never done it, but it doesn't sound like a crank seal is a big deal. Can't you do it without splitting the cases?

Another thing to consider is that the kx450 is not reputed to be the most durable engine. Magazines were reporting things like broken rods after less than 100 hrs.

Write up a list of what you have done to the bike so far, and then think for a bit (or post here for advice) about what else could possibly go wrong, and what is the worst case scenario. Sure, I could get ride of our lemonish bike now, but i've put enough work and $$ into it that not much more can go wrong, and it should be pretty solid from here on out.

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At least you know what you have now and what it needs to be right. If you're bike is a 2001 it's nearly 10 years old and "lemons" don't live that long. Must be a pretty great bike minus some issues. Having been there and back I would think very carefully about jumping off into the hyper 4-stroke abyss. They are super fun but prone to expensive mechanical problems (all of them).

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You bought a bike that's a few birthdays away from the vintage class, notice how many 11 year old kawasaki's are out on the trails.

Those were great bikes in the day, and make good trail bikes but is it really KTM's fault this one won't run forever ?

If your racing and have a chance to trade up to a much newer bike, that's a no brainer, BUT, if your trading for a well used 250-4t you could be out more cash than fixing what you have.

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The brand isn't the issue, its the age/use. Any bike 300-400 hrs should be looking at a new low end check/seals/rebuild. I'm not saying bikes can't go longer but sooner or later something is going to fail and typically it dosn't happen within walking distance of the truck. If you have replaced most all the major parts then you should have a good piece of mind knowing it will now last a good bit longer. Otherwise you will be buying new unforseen (possible) issues. The two xc's look nice and will be a definite step up in performance. Good luck.

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I have recently put in factory connection all around with heavy weight springs (i weigh 220) New pads front and back aswell as a rear rotor. Last spring I put new chain sprockets, grips, silencer, got the header popped out and cleaned fresh tires and wheel bearings. I had a new top end put in when i bought it and have not had enough time to ride it to even need a new one. I have probably put about two grand into a bike that is worth that. Like I said its pretty much new all around with the exception of the botttom end.

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I have an 09 300 and would expect to replace half the stuff you have by next year let alone on a 10 year old bike. I would think most of that stuff would have been standard fair to replace if the bike wasn't in pristine condition when you bought it. Not trying to bash ya buds just trying to give you perspective. Hope it all works out for you. ­čĹŹ

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If you've invested that much money in a 10YO bike I'd keep it. Chances are it needed or was close to needing all upgrades that you have done so if you failed to negotiate a good deal for a bike in that shape, not the bikes fault. If you did happen to get a good deal on it, consider the upgrades to put it into race shape as money well spent. Now you have a racer for 2K!

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I feel your pain, I just went through the same thing with my cr250. I bought the bike cheap just to see if I was into riding again, then I started freshing it up. Things mount up quickly, the only difference is so far I've got away with doing the top-end, without doing the bottom-end. But next time the bottom and the clutch will have to be done.

The bike will go back to where it came from, which, in one word, is teenagers. I'll get one more season out of it, and then be up-front with a buyer about what I've done, and whats going to need to be done next. A smart wrench can get their moneys worth building on everything I've done and the small amount of hours I'll put on it.

I was complaining to a buddy about this exact same thing, and he said. If you buy a $2000 dollar dirtbike, expect to put $2000 into it. He also said, "don't add up your receipts", " And whatever you do, don't let your wife see your receipts".

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I have recently put in factory connection all around with heavy weight springs (i weigh 220) New pads front and back aswell as a rear rotor. Last spring I put new chain sprockets, grips, silencer, got the header popped out and cleaned fresh tires and wheel bearings. I had a new top end put in when i bought it and have not had enough time to ride it to even need a new one. I have probably put about two grand into a bike that is worth that. Like I said its pretty much new all around with the exception of the botttom end.

You haven't pointed out anything unusual, I go through 3-4 sets of pads a year, more if the races are muddy. If I'm lucky, I get 2 years out of rotors. Chain and sprockets are a yearly thing too. Tires are 4-5 sets a year. And none of those have anything to do with the brand of the bike. Spending the cash with FC is not a brand issue either, its a simple fact that at 220, you should to do that with any bike you buy. The bike you're looking at probably needs that too. You haven't pointed out 1 single issue that can be related to the brand of your bike, you'd be spending the same kind of money on any bike you ride. The reality is that if you want to ride and race off-road, it get's expensive.

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No joke it's very expensive and getting worse. I race a couple dozen times a year and do probably 30 hours a month of hard practice (because it's fun and healthy for me). Stuff wears out and has to be replaced. I run the TuBliss system to save on tubes and do all my own mechanical work and maintenance because I'm cheap (and I want it done right). I'm fanatical about not DNFing due to mechanical issues or breaking down in BFE because my bike was not right. Add in expensive motor parts like valve trains and transmissions and it made me ugly, gave me ulcers, headaches, and nearly bankrupt. Good thing there are realistic options for peeps who put lots of hours on bikes like a good 2-stroke!

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Your bike is 10 years old! All the work you said you have done to the KTM is normal for a bike that old. A Jap bike wouldn't of held up as well. I have a buddie with an 05 250 EXC with 16,000 hard off road miles and only on his second topend. If you want not work on your bike all the time buy a newer bike with less time on it. If ride hard and often you need a new bike every 2 years, if you keep them longer they will nickel and dime you to death.

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With the money you have in it already I would be tempted to fix it, especially if you are on a college budget. I have a son on that budget and thats why he is still on his 03 KX250. If you go to a 250 4T be prepared to really twist that throttle. I am amazed when I ride some friends 250 4T (YZF) how they lack the hit and hp I've gotten so used to on my 300.

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