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Checking Oil Flow

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Hi, to check for oil flow after a rebuild do you have to loosen the banjo bolt on the oil line or can you see oil flow via the RHS inlet tappet cover?

Any other ways?

I note also the importance of pouring oil directly to the head so that it gets down to the pump.

Regards

Garry

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Seems to me that the idea is to assure that oil is flowing to the head, so either method you describe would get you there.

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I loosen the upper banjo bolt a turn or two. Oil will come out when the pump comes up to pressure. If you don't prime the oil pump it can take as long as 60 seconds for oil pressure to build. That 60 seconds seemed like an hour. If you prime it goes a lot quicker. It also helps if you fill the oil filter housing as much as you can.

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I always just loosen the upper banjo bolt to check oil flow. It's a go no-go kind of test and the gas tank won't be in the way while you're peeking in the valve inspection cover to watch assembly lube fly every where.

+1 on the oil. Pour half the oil in the frame and the other half in the right intake valve inspection cover. Pour it in any of the other covers and it will over flow and run back out.

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It is a very good idea to prime the oil pump. Easy way is to remove the oil inlet line from the frame tube to the engine and use a squirt oil can to pump oil into the port.

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The oil pump is gravity fed from the frame/tank so will prime itself so long as there is oil in the tank. When the bike is parked up the oil drains down thriugh the pump and into the sump. Nowhere in the FSM does it mention priming the pump even after removal, dis-assembly and re-instalation. Oil that is just poured into the head via the valve inspection cover will simply drain back into the sump and will not get to the bearings so, IMO is a waste of time. The only concession I make to 'priming' is to part fill a new filter when I fit one which probably helps the oil pressure on startup.

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1.) The oil pump is gravity fed from the frame/tank so will prime itself so long as there is oil in the tank. When the bike is parked up the oil drains down thriugh the pump and into the sump.

2.)Nowhere in the FSM does it mention priming the pump even after removal, dis-assembly and re-instalation.

3.) Oil that is just poured into the head via the valve inspection cover will simply drain back into the sump and will not get to the bearings so, IMO is a waste of time.

1.) Not if the oil pump check valve is working properly. It will prevent oil from draining out of the frame reservoir AND from seeping backward through the pump. The oil weight alone is not enough; plenty of people have reported having to pressurize the frame reservoir to overcome the spring and flood the pump to get it primed.

2.) This is right out of the 650L factory service manual, section 4-3:

a9960c4d.jpg

HRC put the same procedure in the '88+ XR600 Power Up kit instructions. I could not not find any priming instructions in the '83-84 XL600 manual I have, so Honda must have figured out in that time that priming was a necessary procedure.

3.)The idea is to make half of the oil immediately available to the scavenge pump and half immediately available to the feed pump, not to prime anything.

Perhaps you thought we were talking about 650Rs?

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+1 On that HT.I rebuilt my XRL engine and could get no oil flow till i put oil in the crankcase,i had the clutch cover off when i did this,but putting oil in the valve adjustment cap will get oil to the pickup...oil will not get down to the pump past the check valve on a new pump like i have..once i removed the pump after a few days away it flowed down from the oil resevoir,,,but until i removed that pump the cases were dry...even after multiple starts,filling the oil filter cavity etc...a Honda tech said to pour oil in through the oil check bolt,but it`s so small it would take forever..

B

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1.) Not if the oil pump check valve is working properly. It will prevent oil from draining out of the frame reservoir AND from seeping backward through the pump. The oil weight alone is not enough; plenty of people have reported having to pressurize the frame reservoir to overcome the spring and flood the pump to get it primed.

2.) This is right out of the 650L factory service manual, section 4-3:

a9960c4d.jpg

HRC put the same procedure in the '88+ XR600 Power Up kit instructions. I could not not find any priming instructions in the '83-84 XL600 manual I have, so Honda must have figured out in that time that priming was a necessary procedure.

3.)The idea is to make half of the oil immediately available to the scavenge pump and half immediately available to the feed pump, not to prime anything.

Perhaps you thought we were talking about 650Rs?

Gaaak! I just assembled the clutch side of my mil last night. Priming the oil pump turned out to be an exercise in silly futility (not a first for me). I followed the instructions... poured oil in, turned the pump until oil flowed through. Then... turn it over to bolt it up and all of the oil runs out 👍. After I dumped about a half a quart of oil all over the place, I gave up and just bolted the darned thing up! Shouldn't I be able to pull the plug (no fuel flowing) and crank it over till I have oil flowing through to the head?

Side note... tightening the little bitty bolts that secure the pump is an exercise in pucker factor! There is a small sweet spot between tight enough to not come loose, but not stripped... No torque specs for these particular bolts in the FSM. Clymer manual basically says... "gudentite".

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1.) Gaaak! I just assembled the clutch side of my mil last night. Priming the oil pump turned out to be an exercise in silly futility (not a first for me). I followed the instructions... poured oil in, turned the pump until oil flowed through. Then... turn it over to bolt it up and all of the oil runs out 👍. After I dumped about a half a quart of oil all over the place, I gave up and just bolted the darned thing up! Shouldn't I be able to pull the plug (no fuel flowing) and crank it over till I have oil flowing through to the head?

2.) Side note... tightening the little bitty bolts that secure the pump is an exercise in pucker factor! There is a small sweet spot between tight enough to not come loose, but not stripped... No torque specs for these particular bolts in the FSM. Clymer manual basically says... "gudentite".

1.) I don't think the pump has to actually be full of oil when it's bolted on; it just has has to be primed...which you did. I imagine you probably could remove the spark plug and crank the engine until the oil flows.

2.) If there is no specific torque value assigned to the fastener, then it is tightened according to the table of torque values arranged by fastener size. That table is often near the front of the service manual. I don't know about Clymer. I have one, but it's easier to look at the .pdf factory service manuals here on my computer.🤣

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1.) I don't think the pump has to actually be full of oil when it's bolted on; it just has has to be primed...which you did. I imagine you probably could remove the spark plug and crank the engine until the oil flows.

2.) If there is no specific torque value assigned to the fastener, then it is tightened according to the table of torque values arranged by fastener size. That table is often near the front of the service manual. I don't know about Clymer. I have one, but it's easier to look at the .pdf factory service manuals here on my computer. :jawdrop:

After I got about a half a quart into the exercise, I realized the futility of it. It seemed that as much was running out as I had pumped in 👍 Oh well... It was late... a couple of beers on board... Kept thinking: HT said to prime the :censored:ed pump, so prime the thing! 🙂 who knows, I probably have the clutch basket on the wrong side of the engine. I haven't looked at it tonight :applause: Fermented hops and motor oil seem to go so well together, but maybe not!🤣

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Thanks for the input,

I filled the oil filter area with a syringe with about 150 ml and then put 600 ml in the RHS inlet. Then put 25 ml over each valve. Rest in the frame.

Ran the bike for two minutes. Checked that oil level had changed. Then ran with banjo bolt loose. Oil flow almost immedfiately.

Regards

Garry

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