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Seized Rod Rebuild

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Hey all, I'm new to this forum, but did do some searching before posting... I just purchased a 2006 CRF450R with relatively low hours, but it has a seized connecting rod. The crank still rotates within the confines of the seized rod bearing, so it appears that it is just the rod at this point. My question is this, I am considering getting a complete "Bottom End Rebuild Kit" from Wiseco to drop in after I tear everything down, clean and inspect. Any thoughts? A local shop is willing to recon my crank and install a new rod on the existing crank; I'm looking at $400 for parts and labor going that route. I'm not opposed to spending that money to have them do it, but doing my own wrenching is somewhat a point of pride with me.

If the quality is good on the Wiseco kits (I only have two-stroke experience with Wiseco) it seems like an excellent value. The local shop also mentioned needing a "shim kit" for the crank (or rod) and stated that was approximately $80. I assume (from 4-stroke car engine assembly) this must be for setting the crank end-play? I don't see any reference to that in the Wiseco kit? Essentially I'm looking for opinions on what options I should pursue (assuming it is truly only the connecting rod seized on the rod journal)? What sort of hidden processes might I be overlooking. Yes, I do have a manual for the bike and I will be using it, just haven't had the opportunity to read through it yet. I've built multiple engine setups for my banshee, so I'm mechanically inclined and have plenty of tools, presses etc. at my disposal. Just new to the 4-stroke thumper bike scene.

Thanks! -Brian

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I would use a new OEM Honda crankshaft assembly. They run $246 from Apache.

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whether a stock crank or whatever,they are all cheap enough to not mess around with rebuilding one.

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Youre going to need a flywheel puller and balancer nut socket and the rest is done with basic tools. The shim kit is for the valves. You will need one of those too. You can heat the cases in an oven to remove and install the bearings.

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i just pulled a used rod/crank from my crf450, im asking $99+shipping. I had my 450 apart installing an 08 head, ss valves and a finnicky 4th gear so for $280 ordered an OEM crank/rod. My mechanic was like "why.. it has zero up'n down and is otherwise in spec".. I have the money to keep good parts in my stuff, and had a bunch of hours on it and intend to keep it awhile, so rather than pay the restock fee just had him put it in. It is ready to ship and can email ya pics if you like.

Although it has a bunch of hours on it, the bike has never been raced and i can honestly count on 1 hand the times it has seen the rev limiter. I have some vids on youtube.com of the trail riding that my bike does.

greg

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@Eddie: That is kind of what it seemed to me. For the money it didn't even seem like it was worth MY time (free labor) to mess with pressing the crank apart and reconing the rod.

@jcross: Yeah, I had already planned on picking up a flywheel puller regardless of who did the work, but didn't know about the balancer nut socket yet, thanks! The valves were just checked about a month and a half ago and only have one ride (the final ride) on them so far. However, I figured I'd get a shim kit and check them on reassembly. I'm just one of those guys that prefers to have the tools and parts needed for potential maintenance. That $80 now makes sense in the context of the valve shim kit, since that is the average price I've seen around.

I'm leaning towards just getting some sort of complete bottom end and dropping that in myself. It doesn't really seem to be that much more money and it is certainly far less time in labor!

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Eddie is right. Buy a new OEM crank and put it in yourself. While youre in there you may as well put a piston in it too.

These little thumpers are actually easier to do than a two stroke once you get past the top end. At least you dont have to use pullers and and presses to get them apart and together.

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Well I got it all broken down yesterday, less than 24 hours after I took ownership of the bike. The rest of the internals look amazing; you can hardly tell the gears in the tranny have been used! In doing some talking here locally, I think I'm going to put a new rod in it and a new piston while I'm in there too.

I found what appeared to be a small piece of blue shop paper towel in the oil pump pickup, which I am assuming is probably the offending culprit in the whole mess. The previous owner had just changed the oil before this fateful ride, so the timeline sort of fits.

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