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Okay guys, been ridin trails now for about three months and I'm feelin fairly comfortable. There is a local track that has open practice night and I'm itchin to ride like crazy and being that the track is closer than the trails I ride I'm thinkin about givin it a shot. This will be my first time at a track so I'm just lookin for some info/tips on what to expect,any help and input would be greatly appreciatted

Thanks

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take it slow, dont make any sudden line changes. the faster guys will go around you. if you try to get out of their way you will both collide.

dont try to jump anything more than a table. getting hurt on your 1st time out sucks.

leave your ego in your truck. the track is humbling. have fun

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take it slow, dont make any sudden line changes. the faster guys will go around you. if you try to get out of their way you will both collide.

dont try to jump anything more than a table. getting hurt on your 1st time out sucks.

leave your ego in your truck. the track is humbling. have fun

Sounds like you summed it up for the OP, go slow the track is a very, VERY different beast then the trails! There will be some guys flying out there, dont try to keep up! Dont let the pair between your legs overpower your head! If your first instinct is to not try something your probably right, you shouldnt (I made this mistake)! He stated the most important thing though, stay in your line and the fast guys will gladly/ nicely go around you! Start swapping lines and and get in thier way and theyll probably run you off the track. Just be curteous and HAVE FUN and youll fall in love!

The table tops are perfect practice jumps because there is a morgin for error, but dont get too excited and over jump anything or try to clear it your first lap... its all about building up to that, work on technique and form, speed and everything else will come with time and practice!

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Definitely hold your line. Trying to get out of the way, usually puts you in the way. If your getting passed in practice then the guy behind you is obviously faster and is either going to go around you, or stay behind you. It will be up to them. Trying to guess what they are going to do could cause a wreck. Don't worry, they won't plow you out of your line =p.

Also, try to stay away from jumping doubles, unless its literally like 2 feet long. Those will come with time. Fast tables can be dangerous too. Make sure you pace yourself. Brains before brawn. Everyone has to start somewhere.

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I'm new to mx too and those sharp little kicker jumps are tricky as hell too and probably better to avoid unless you like staring at the ground or the sky... I'm much happier on nice big tables or very easy short doubles...

Don't worry about the jumps. Get smooth with everything else first...

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i have already posted in a similar thread, but i have some more questions on this as well. as far as in air bike control, i understand gas rises the front, and back brake drops it. i know to stay neutral over the bike and be as balanced as possible when in the air (not like im expecting to get much), and i dont mean to sound like an idiot, but the clutch needs to be pulled in in the air, unless on the gas right? (btw im riding a yz125)

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No the clutch is only pulled in the air when applying rear brake to prevent the bike from staling. U can be on the throttle or off when in the air, I using let off and then get back on it right before u land cause landing w/ throttle helps keep the bike start.👍

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So to further this discussion, how would the experienced riders suggest the newbies progress their riding?

I have been to the track a couple of times. The first track (Thunder Valley) was way too much for me. I was nothing more than a moving road block and that was with me holding my line everywhere. I felt like I needed a red flag hanging out of my back pocket to signal the other riders to steer clear of me. The second trip was to a more novice friendly track in my area that has both an intermediate track and a pro track. I stuck to the intermediate track and followed a kid (on an 85) around the track for a couple of laps. He seemed to know the track so I figured I could learn the track better by following him.

What I am getting at here is, after you learn the track and such what is the best way to move on to jumping the different jumps? Should we start with tabletops and then move on to the other jumps? When do yo know when it is time to go for that double? I should probably look into a mx school or clinic in the area and see where that takes me.

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My only advice on this subject from my past experience is that youll know when to pull the trigger on the doubles and such, tabletops are a good starting point because of the margin for error. For me personally the hardest part about mx when I first started wasnt so much the bike control as it was knowing the speeds and angles in which to hit the jumps. Stick to working on cornering and body position and things like that and the big air will just come naturally.

But Ive found that when it comes down to jumping specifically its easiest to control the bike if you stay in the meat of the power band all the time, nothing worse than going up the face of a double only to hit the "power" or realizing your not going to hit it. Realizing your not going to get into the power being the worse of the two options. Once you get the speed and cornering down the jumping will seem like a breeze, it seems boring but being too familiar with the characteristics of your bike never hurts and it will only make it safer for you.

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I am new to the whole dirt bike thing. I've only been to an MX track twice. I will make one strong suggestion to the OP based off of personal experience.

If you are going to the track by yourself or with someone else who has never been to that particular track get everything ready to ride but, before you take off, find someone who is experienced at that track. Introduce yourself, let them know that you are a beginner rider, then ask them if they will let you follow them around the track at a slower pace so that you can learn the correct line and path to follow. The last thing you want is to take a wrong turn (as I did) and wind up cresting a hill going the wrong way just as someone else is about to come blasting up it from the correct direction.

Luckily no one got hurt in this incident. The guy going the right way hadn't gotten back on the throttle yet. I was embarrassed as hell and felt like just loading the bike up and leaving. The guy was cool though. He accepted my apology. I asked him if he would show me the proper path around the track. He gladly did so and I followed him at low speed for two laps. I wound up having a great time and talked to him several more times that day.

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No the clutch is only pulled in the air when applying rear brake to prevent the bike from staling. U can be on the throttle or off when in the air, I using let off and then get back on it right before u land cause landing w/ throttle helps keep the bike start.👍

I agree that you want to make sure that you are on the gas (not full throttle) when you land. I made the mistake one time of being off the gas when I landed a 50 foot step-up. It caused the bike to want to quickly slow down (I ride a 4 stroke which has engine braking), and it just about threw me into the handlebars.

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I am new to the whole dirt bike thing. I've only been to an MX track twice. I will make one strong suggestion to the OP based off of personal experience.

If you are going to the track by yourself or with someone else who has never been to that particular track get everything ready to ride but, before you take off, find someone who is experienced at that track. Introduce yourself, let them know that you are a beginner rider, then ask them if they will let you follow them around the track at a slower pace so that you can learn the correct line and path to follow. The last thing you want is to take a wrong turn (as I did) and wind up cresting a hill going the wrong way just as someone else is about to come blasting up it from the correct direction.

Luckily no one got hurt in this incident. The guy going the right way hadn't gotten back on the throttle yet. I was embarrassed as hell and felt like just loading the bike up and leaving. The guy was cool though. He accepted my apology. I asked him if he would show me the proper path around the track. He gladly did so and I followed him at low speed for two laps. I wound up having a great time and talked to him several more times that day.

That's a good story to hear! I like hearing about stuff like this, that new people have a positive experience, making them want to go back to the track. I was very intimidated the first time I went last year. It was my day off but my buddy that did ride had to work. I was dying to try a track so I went by myself. I lowsided in a hardpacked corner on the first lap and snapped off my clutch lever. Some guy there broke out his kit and dug for awhile to see if he had a lever that would fit but no luck, he was really friendly and we talked for awhile. I came to learn you'll meet some of the friendliest folks at the track or on the trail. I think it's because we all love talking about riding so much.👍

The first track (Thunder Valley) was way too much for me. I was nothing more than a moving road block and that was with me holding my line everywhere. I felt like I needed a red flag hanging out of my back pocket to signal the other riders to steer clear of me. The second trip was to a more novice friendly track in my area that has both an intermediate track and a pro track. I stuck to the intermediate track and followed a kid (on an 85) around the track for a couple of laps. He seemed to know the track so I figured I could learn the track better by following him.

Oh man! Thunder Valley would be BRUTAL for a first time track ride! Glad you made it.

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