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i have been going to physio therapy for 5 weeks now....my therapist is having one hell of a time tryin to get my VMO muscle fired up...it doesn't wanna budge...she said on Friday she is gonna try a couple more things and if that doesn't work then she was gonna send me back to my surgeon....I then said to her....ummm what can the surgeon do...she said i don't know....

my question is...is there anything the surgeon can do???

my prob is...my VMO muscle is not working....and my knee cap is being pulled laterally by the other muscles.......thats how she explained it to me...

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This is almost exactly what is currently happening with me and my physio has me on the leg extension machine. My trainer hold it at the upper point and i lower to about half way, then he assists to lift up and we repeat it 8 times.

Whether this is helping yet or not i dont know, as i am not in formal PT now and won't see physio again on a professional basis until just before i next see the surgeon. We are hoping that it will help as my knee cap is being pulled laterally and after all the problems that i have had in the past we sure dont need another new problem.

C

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I had a similar issue back a while when I was recovering from a broken femur.

My Physio had to hook up a machine to electricaly stimulate and contract the VMO. It wasnt fun but 3 or four sessions got it moving.......

Not sure about knees but I was having trouble with my shoulder post surgery.

It was time for me to start PT after surgery, but my muscles/tendons were too tight. The therapist hooked me to a machine like the quote above and things started to loosen up. The other thing that helped was massaging the effected area; this made a world of difference. Before long I was able to do some "real" PT. Hope this helps:thumbsup:

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I completely ruptured my patella tendon two years ago and this injury is devastating to the VMO (not to mention a horrible injury in general). I’ve been involved in bodybuilding and fitness for the past 25 years so my goal was to rebuild my leg to it’s previous status. The key movements that I found helped the VMO are cycling, lunges, leg extensions, and walking down steep hills. Be very careful with the leg extensions, they put direct shearing forces on the patella and patella tendon and they aren’t the best exercise from a knee health standpoint (but do work for VMO development). I’ve been advised to avoid leg extensions for life due to my ruptured patella tendon however I’ve just decided to do them as a light high rep exercise instead of quitting them (light being relative to the weight I was previously using) . Don’t expect the VMO to spring back quickly, it’s a tenacious muscle to build and in some cases genetics play a role in VMO development.

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