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What happened to my powerful pig?


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Out riding last weekend. The final day was an epic 193 miles of dirt with some pavement thrown in. As I approached our campsite, my piggie just lost power and won't rev out at all.

I thought it might be a clogged air filter since it was three days of desert riding but after a thorough cleaning, no change in pig power today.

The day prior to the power drop, I had changed clip positions from #2 to #3 and that seemed to give it a boost for most of the day until it dropped out.

Motor starts and idles without any real issues and I know I need to adjust valves because they're really noisy and loose right now. There are some other maintenance tasks to accomplish but I'm stumped over this power loss. It's similar to choking it and running it in that fashion. Do I need to open the carb back up and what should I be looking to adjust now?

I'm stumped.

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Out riding last weekend. The final day was an epic 193 miles of dirt with some pavement thrown in. As I approached our campsite, my piggie just lost power and won't rev out at all.

I thought it might be a clogged air filter since it was three days of desert riding but after a thorough cleaning, no change in pig power today.

The day prior to the power drop, I had changed clip positions from #2 to #3 and that seemed to give it a boost for most of the day until it dropped out.

Motor starts and idles without any real issues and I know I need to adjust valves because they're really noisy and loose right now. There are some other maintenance tasks to accomplish but I'm stumped over this power loss. It's similar to choking it and running it in that fashion. Do I need to open the carb back up and what should I be looking to adjust now?

I'm stumped.

well your valve not being adjusted properly could make you lose some power im sure

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Check your compression.

+1.....when diagnosing an engine always start at the first check on the list,,always do a compression test first.....you gotta know the health of the engine first.....i can`t count how many times a tech will start elsewhere first,throw a pile of money at the problem,and find out it`s lost compression from a number of reasons...and he just shot himself in the foot,the customer is pissed,and doesn`t wanna pay for the unnecessary work done so far..

Do a comp test,,then go to the next easiest check which might be the strength of the fire(nice strong spark)...then go to other things like fuel...

B

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yea, jeez, there's not much to these things. Adjust the valves and maybe put a new plug in there. IF that doesn't do it, look at the carb.

That's first on the list...

Frequent oil changes and a new top end in the past 500 miles (the old rings were still in spec - prolly not needed).

I will have to check that clip......make sure it didn't pop out somehow....how would that happen?

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+1 on check the compression, it can save an awful lot of time. Assuming that's good then you're left with a fuel or spark issue. I'd try changing the plug since it will be out anyway for the compression test. I had a new NGK plug I'd put in the previous day on a Yamaha RD350 suddenly fail on a spirited ride. I thought I'd holed a piston or something, but the bike would idle perfectly. As soon as I touched the throttle I was back on one cylinder. Put the old plug back in and it ran perfectly.

If you eliminate the plug and compression, then barring something unusual with your ignition timing it's most likely something gumming your carb somewhere.

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