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Hooking up a Battery Tender

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Hello,

I have a question I was hoping someone could answer. Can I hook up the batter tender eye hooks up to my Suzuki DRZ 400 SM positive to positive and negative to negative while on the bike without messing up the electronics on the bike?

Normally we all do it this way when it's off the bike, but I was reading the instructions and it has separate instructions for hooking up the tender when it's on the vehicle/bike which has me asking this question.

In the directions for my tender, it talks about whether the vehicle is positively grounded or negatively grounded and in each instance describes how you should hook it up with each one (pos. or neg. grounded). If I remember correctly, the directions "say if the vehicle is negatively grounded," you only hook up the positive of the tender to the positive on the battery and the negative to the ground or chassis. Vice versa if it is positively grounded. I want to make sure that if I hook it up like I do as if the battery was off the bike I don't mess anything up since the directions speak to it being hooked up differently on the bike. And I believe the DRZ is negatively grounded but am not 100% sure. Anyone have input or suggestions?

Many thanks!

Edited by ramblingman

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Hello,

I have a question I was hoping someone could answer. Can I hook up the batter tender eye hooks up to my Suzuki DRZ 400 SM positive to positive and negative to negative while on the bike without messing up the electronics on the bike?

Normally we all do it this way when it's off the bike, but I was reading the instructions and it has separate instructions for hooking up the tender when it's on the vehicle/bike which has me asking this question.

In the directions for my tender, it talks about whether the vehicle is positively grounded or negatively grounded and in each instance describes how you should hook it up with each one (pos. or neg. grounded). If I remember correctly, when it's "say negatively grounded," you only hook up the positive of the tender to the positive on the battery and the negative to the ground or chassis. Vice versa if it is positively grounded. I want to make sure that if I hook it up like I do as if the battery was off the bike I don't mess anything up since the directions speak to it being hooked up differently on the bike. And I believe the DRZ is negatively grounded but am not 100% sure. Anyone have input or suggestions?

Many thanks!

Positive from tender to positive on the battery... Negative from tender to negative on the battery... You will be fine....

👍:thumbsup:

Erling

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Thanks for the reply, but might you or anyone else know why they recommend grounding one of the wire on the tender to the chassis when on a vehicle. I can't understand this except that maybe it may mess with the electronics or something?

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do not keep the battery tender attached to your battery but not plugged in. it will drain the battery completely flat. i've done this to cycle batteries when i brought them in for the winter with nasty, surprising results.

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do not keep the battery tender attached to your battery but not plugged in. it will drain the battery completely flat. i've done this to cycle batteries when i brought them in for the winter with nasty, surprising results.

I have never had an issue, how cold are your winters? I have the tender tails on three bikes and change the bike to be charged once a week.

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Thanks for the reply, but might you or anyone else know why they recommend grounding one of the wire on the tender to the chassis when on a vehicle. I can't understand this except that maybe it may mess with the electronics or something?

Perhaps a disclaimer..... Just for safety. When you hook it up to the battery negative.....the bikes negative wire goes to the frame..... So you are ok... Perhaps in a floating gnd. setup....but even then I don`t see a need.

👍:thumbsup:

Erling

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It is so when you remove the charger, you can remove the negative first from the frame and if it sparks it is safer since the spark does not occur near the battery. When you remove the positive lead nothing happens because the negative lead is already disconnected. If the battery gives off any hydrogen during the charging process (they all do) and it gets trapped somewhere in the bike (airbox, under the seat, etc.) it could explode.

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It is so when you remove the charger, you can remove the negative first from the frame and if it sparks it is safer since the spark does not occur near the battery. When you remove the positive lead nothing happens because the negative lead is already disconnected. If the battery gives off any hydrogen during the charging process (they all do) and it gets trapped somewhere in the bike (airbox, under the seat, etc.) it could explode.

Thanks for the explanation. But wouldn't you still get hydrogen even if you had the battery off the vehicle? Never mind, I think I answered my own Q. I guess not as much because it's in the open air where it won't get trapped.

So, the battery minder/tender would charge just fine by using the positive alone and grounding the tender lead to a screw or something? I am guessing most people just do pos. to pos. and neg. to neg., but how do you set your up? This has got me thinking. Maybe I should set up a poll for this.

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I have never had an issue, how cold are your winters? I have the tender tails on three bikes and change the bike to be charged once a week.

I suspect he meant the Tender wasn't plugged into the wall while is was connected to the battery. I doubt they engineered the Tender for that situation, so it's acting as a load on the battery.

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I have attached 1 wire to pos and 1 wire to neg, put heat shrink over them annd added male and female connectors, then ran the wires out of the left side of the battery box just under the fender. On the battery tender I installed male and female connectors. This alows quick hook up's and you can not plug it in backwards. All of my bike are setup this way.

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Maybe I should set up a poll for this.

It's really not that big of an issue. A trickle charger is not going to produce H2 at a very fast rate, and H2 dissipates rather quickly.

The whole "connect to the frame" thing came from using jumper cables on cars, where you can be dumping 100s of amps into the battery. That's why car jumper cables are made from 8 gauge wire. The BT uses, what, 22 gauge?

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I have attached 1 wire to pos and 1 wire to neg, put heat shrink over them annd added male and female connectors, then ran the wires out of the left side of the battery box just under the fender. On the battery tender I installed male and female connectors. This alows quick hook up's and you can not plug it in backwards. All of my bike are setup this way.

Battery Tender battery tenders have an SAE plug built into the lead, don't they?

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Same reason they say do it with jumper cables, so if there is an arc its not directly above the battery. Just hook it to the battery and dont worry about it. Try to remember to unplug it before you start the bike. It is possible to OL the charger. Wont hurt the bike though.

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Thanks for the explanation. But wouldn't you still get hydrogen even if you had the battery off the vehicle? Never mind, I think I answered my own Q. I guess not as much because it's in the open air where it won't get trapped.

So, the battery minder/tender would charge just fine by using the positive alone and grounding the tender lead to a screw or something? I am guessing most people just do pos. to pos. and neg. to neg., but how do you set your up? This has got me thinking. Maybe I should set up a poll for this.

I use the Deltran Battery Tender Plus. It charges at 1.25 amp/hour. A quick connector came with it, so I installed it onto the Yuasa battery terminals -- positive to positive and negative to negative. When I need to put the battery on tender, I attach the SAE male connector on the battery tender to the SAE female connector on the quick connector. My mechanic suggested not to leave the battery being charged without monitoring. But so far, in the past 3.5 years of owning motorcycles, I've not experienced any negative consequences in leaving my bikes on the tender and unmonitored. In "The Essential Guide to Motorcycle Maintenance," Mark Zimmerman suggested removing the battery from the bike to charge it. But the quick connector lets the rider dispense with battery removal. Only other meaningful caveat about trickle charging the battery: Need to let the battery rest for at least half an hour, if not longer (Zimmerman suggested an hour), to let the chemicals settle. Otherwise, the battery could go KaBOOM if the ignition is engaged and before the hydrogen molecules have stopped doing their chemical thing.

As to your question regarding a frame being negatively ground, apparently most vehicles manufactured today are negatively ground to the frame. I've not checked the DRZ owners manual to see if the bike is also negatively ground, but in the past three years this bike has been hooked up, the batteries have successfully been trickle charged.

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Starting your bike immedieatly after removing the charger is not going to cause the battery to explode, .. ..just not going to happen. 👍

Hook the tender directly to the battery. Remember, neg off first, and on last.. You do that so if the tool your using on the positive side touches the frame it will not ground out.

All modern vehicles, automotive and motorcycle are negative ground 12v systems.

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I have only ever seen one battery that blew up. It was in a pick-up truck that a budy of mine was jump starting. Never hook up jumpers backwards! Starting the bike right after charging is not a hazard. I have even started it with the charger still on. Pulled the charger off its little shelf in the shed when I reached the end of the cord. OOPS!

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I have never had an issue, how cold are your winters? I have the tender tails on three bikes and change the bike to be charged once a week.

i said i brought the batteries inside so temperature doesn't matter. if you leave the tender attached and not plugged in, it will discharge the battery. i dont know how long it takes though. might have taken two weeks.

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I use the Deltran Battery Tender Plus. It charges at 1.25 amp/hour. A quick connector came with it, so I installed it onto the Yuasa battery terminals -- positive to positive and negative to negative. When I need to put the battery on tender, I attach the SAE male connector on the battery tender to the SAE female connector on the quick connector. My mechanic suggested not to leave the battery being charged without monitoring. But so far, in the past 3.5 years of owning motorcycles, I've not experienced any negative consequences in leaving my bikes on the tender and unmonitored. In "The Essential Guide to Motorcycle Maintenance," Mark Zimmerman suggested removing the battery from the bike to charge it. But the quick connector lets the rider dispense with battery removal. Only other meaningful caveat about trickle charging the battery: Need to let the battery rest for at least half an hour, if not longer (Zimmerman suggested an hour), to let the chemicals settle. Otherwise, the battery could go KaBOOM if the ignition is engaged and before the hydrogen molecules have stopped doing their chemical thing.

As to your question regarding a frame being negatively ground, apparently most vehicles manufactured today are negatively ground to the frame. I've not checked the DRZ owners manual to see if the bike is also negatively ground, but in the past three years this bike has been hooked up, the batteries have successfully been trickle charged.

Thanks for everyone getting back to me. I have Mark Zimmerman's Essential Guide to Motorcycle Maintenance but did not find the section where it says that it could explode. I hope this is not true, because I really don't have to want to wait for about a half an hour to ride after I unhook the battery. Haven't had any problems since I hooked it up and ride right away.

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Starting your bike immedieatly after removing the charger is not going to cause the battery to explode, .. ..just not going to happen. 👍

Hook the tender directly to the battery. Remember, neg off first, and on last.. You do that so if the tool your using on the positive side touches the frame it will not ground out.

All modern vehicles, automotive and motorcycle are negative ground 12v systems.

Thanks again Bronco 78!

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