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Tough job ahead


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Just did a search on gasket removal and sounds like there are some solvents that can be used but still going to take a lot of elbow grease. It is going to be especially tricky around the opening of the cases where the sleeve came out, would hate if the stuff got scraped down into there. Anyone with some experienced advice 👍 would be greatly appreciated.🤣

ry%3D400

ry%3D400

ry%3D400

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I have used some gasket removal solvents before. They work ok if your patient. Keep the solvent off your skin. You may have to use a brass wire brush as well. You might try and tape around the sleve if you use the brass wire brush.

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Parts Washer, Razor Blades, Scotch Brite Pads, non marring scraper. That's what I use. Its still a tedious process, but you learn to enjoy it.

Or if its something like a clutch cover I just use gasket removing discs and my right angle die grinder. That's the most fun way.

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Last night I tried out a razor, x-acto knife and lastly a small wood chisel. Actually found the wood chisel to work real well. I was trying to get down to the surface and did end up with some scraping with light scratches. Which I guess is to be expected . . ? No real nicks except for a couple of places along the edges which came from the thin blades of the razor and x-acto catching. It got me to thinking about sealing and what to expect when trying to put on the next gasket. I have read that some like to put the gasket on dry where as some put copper coat on the gasket and surface then leave to dry before putting it on. I also read that some oil the threads of the bolts and others who tighten 10lbs. beyond the torque spec. Just wondering what kind of feed back I can get on these approaches.

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Just wanted to give a follow up on what I learned for posterity 👍 As I stated in my last post I used a wood chisel to do the work. It is done and the surfaces are lightly effected but effected non the less. If I could recommend to anyone else who may need to take off gaskets that they take off most of the material with a wood chisel down to a very thin layer. Then take some type of solvent or even oil to saturate the remaining material until it softens then get a non-marring tool. Unfortunately I didn’t discover this until I was nearly done with my gasket removal when in a area that had oil sitting on it for some time was soft and came right off. Then I was in NAPA today and discovered the non-marring tool. Had I sliced most all of the gaskets off then saturated the remaining portion with oil and removed with a non-marring tool I probably would have left no trace.

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