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Trouble adjusting valves 05 525 EXC


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Ive searched, Ive read, Ive watched every youtube video out there. I just went to adjust my valves and they kicked my ....... Im pretty good with a wrench. Ive built automatic transmissions, put lifts in trucks, done a bunch of other crap too. But this war was won by the valves not by me.

I tried and tried to find top dead center and be sure that I had the right one. I could never be sure. To make matters worse, when I thought that I had found TDC I went to check the clearance on my intake valves and I couldnt get my .005 feeler gauge in there at all. Not even close. I had 0 clearance. So, one of two things is wrong. Either Im not at TDC like I thought I was, or something is out of whack. This is the first time the bike has gotten a valve adjustment and it has got to have between 75 and 100 hours on it. Im guessing, I dont have an hourmeter. So, any advice? input?

Im almost to the point of bringing it to the shop to have the valves adjusted but I cant really afford it right now nor would I be able to sleep at night knowing that they did for a bunch of money what I should be able to do for free.

Also, I didnt have the assistance of another person, which wouldve been nice. And, its tough getting my big ole meat hooks into those tight little spaces, especially considering one of those meat hooks is broken.👍🤣

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Don't think it should be that bad but I've never worked on that particular bike. All you really have to do is find the compression stroke Top Dead Center (TDC). On the compression stroke TDC both of the intake and exhast valves should not be moving. On the exhast stroke TDC both intake and exhast valves will be moving at TDC (exhast will be opening when the piston is moving up and closing when it is moving down. intake will be opening at TDC and will be open on the down stroke to suck in fresh air/gas).

It should be pretty easy to find the proper TDC by observing when the piston is at the top of the stroke in which niether valve is moving.

If there is no clearance between your rockers and valves you need an adjustment badly. If there is no clearance, the valves are not fully closing and bad things will happen and the bike will not run correctly.

Hope that helps.

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you dont need TDC, just the overlap between strokes where one side is opening and the other is loose and closed. Check the closed-loose side, then do the other the same.

Technically true.....but why not try to keep things as simple as possible?

Just find the compression stroke TDC and you're good. 👍

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TDC has nothing to do with the valves. That is crank position. You have a 50/50 chance of being on the correct TDC.

Adjust the intakes when the exhaust is opening. Adjust the exhaust when the intakes are closing.

Use 1/6 method for setting the valves.

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TDC has nothing to do with the valves. That is crank position. You have a 50/50 chance of being on the correct TDC.

How could you have a 50/50 chance if you look to see if the valves/rockers are moving? There are only 2 TDC's and they alternate and then repeat....it really is not that difficult of a concept.

If you're going to say that you only have a 50/50 shot then you might as well say that there is only a 50/50 shot with any method that you use. 👍

Edited by Rocker01
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Do yourself a favor, and go over to KTM talk and look in the valve section. You will find what you are looking for. Do NOT try and find tdc because like said above, you have a 50/50 chance of getting it right. Next, you may very well be at tdc and your intakes have 0 clearance. That can happen. Seriously, visit ktmtalk and you will find out that it is not hard at all and actually pretty easy.

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I thought that everybody knew that stock KTM RFS intake valves gradually close up with time due to valve recession and soft valve head material. They must be checked/adjusted at no greater than 30 hour intervals. The best solution are stainless steel Kibblewhite replacement valves.

.....and yes, trying to find TDC is a total waste of time.

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I thought that everybody knew that stock KTM RFS intake valves gradually close up with time due to valve recession and soft valve head material. They must be checked/adjusted at no greater than 30 hour intervals. The best solution are stainless steel Kibblewhite replacement valves.

.....and yes, trying to find TDC is a total waste of time.

That sums it up- but not everyone knows about it.

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what do you mean waste of time, on my yzf sure you can just go by cam position but for a beginner they may not no the proper cam position etc

just make sure the cam timing marks are lined up then measure clearance there

on my yzf the cams should be facing out

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well, this means that you have not spent enuf time researching your KTM and how to work on it. I know it seems wrong, but just forget lots of what you already know. Use the slack or overlap not TDC, use the 1/6 turn method and it is easy, dont make it into more than it is. No timing marks, no locking the crank, etc.

We answer this question every week or two year after year.

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Yeah I know this question and threads like these pop up crazy but its just really bugging me. I just have no confidence in knowing what position the valves are in and when to adjust. Even after reading everything they wrote I still second guess myself when trying to get the valves in the proper place for adjusting. Anyone near by want to supervise while I do them? I can come to you! Ill buy you a 30 pack!

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