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Slowish-Speed Jumps


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I'm a noob to jumping, but at the tracks that I ride at, I just started getting some air. On one double in particular, just because jumping is fun, I roll over the first jump, then clutch and pin it off of the landing . Since I hit it barely in/ just below powerband (1st gear), it starts to pull, and ends up with a nice even jump. However, any of the other jumps that I try to hit low speed result in either more air than I expected, or a BAD nose dive. I want to start clearing the doubles, but a few almost-crashes while trying to pussyfoot off the jumps have me a bit scared that I'm gonna nose dive. Logic points me towards going for gold, but I can't shake that feeling.

These jumps are basically made for 4-strokes and 125s, since they have kinda-short run-ups (for the one, if I hit it in powerband, it would only be because my wheel was spinning) and steep kicker-like ramps. (Just for reference). They're maybe 20-25 feet long.

Now my question is, since I'm nose-diving at low speeds, maybe it's just that I'm not going fast enough to get both wheels level in the air. Would just hitting the jumps with enough speed to clear them make it easier to keep the bike level? I'm pretty sure it would, because I feel relaxed and in the right position when going off the jumps, and I'm already comfortable pulling the front wheel up and getting air off of little rollers and bumps and stuff when necessary or when I want to. I just want to make sure whether I should keep the throttle steady if I have enough speed, roll on it a bit on the face, or pin it completely.

Just looking for a bit of reassurance before I go out and kill myself my fourth time out on my KTM ๐Ÿ‘

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I am fairly new to jumping as well and for me blipping the throttle at the peak of the kicker levels me out better, was getting nose dive because I was holding steady throttle and not compensating for the uphill of the kicker causing the engine to bog/lug down. I am ONLY sharing my expierience. I know one thing for sure I would rather land back wheel first vs. nose dive.I think practice and technique are the reaL KEYS TO JUMPING SMOOTH. if all else fails contact v757b he is the king ๐Ÿ‘ j/k

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I don't have enough seat time to speak from experience however I know slow speed causes lots of issues for me. I only had to pick up about 5mph (guessing) to stabilize my jumps on the smaller ones. Pulling hard on the bars made my front end come too far up so I hold moderate pressure and steady speed up the face, grip the side of the bike with my knees and look for the landing location to adjust if need be. Speed is your friend to a point :0)

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jumps are all 90% muscle memory, 10% stratagy and 100% trust. my friend used to tell me all the time "dont overthink it homer" i would reply not an issue

but it works. you sound like your really new to motorcross, so find some tame smaller table tops you can work yourself up to. and practice... and doubles arent good for learning on... and dont think to much just hit the jump your body will learn what to do.

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I`m new to mx to. I started last week doing the same thing. Don`t coast up the jump coast some where else. Stay on the gas coming up the face of a jump and give it a little more right before your back tire leaves the ground not to much or you`ll wreck but just a little snap.

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I'm a noob to jumping, but at the tracks that I ride at, I just started getting some air. On one double in particular, just because jumping is fun, I roll over the first jump, then clutch and pin it off of the landing . Since I hit it barely in/ just below powerband (1st gear), it starts to pull, and ends up with a nice even jump. However, any of the other jumps that I try to hit low speed result in either more air than I expected, or a BAD nose dive. I want to start clearing the doubles, but a few almost-crashes while trying to pussyfoot off the jumps have me a bit scared that I'm gonna nose dive. Logic points me towards going for gold, but I can't shake that feeling.

These jumps are basically made for 4-strokes and 125s, since they have kinda-short run-ups (for the one, if I hit it in powerband, it would only be because my wheel was spinning) and steep kicker-like ramps. (Just for reference). They're maybe 20-25 feet long.

Now my question is, since I'm nose-diving at low speeds, maybe it's just that I'm not going fast enough to get both wheels level in the air. Would just hitting the jumps with enough speed to clear them make it easier to keep the bike level? I'm pretty sure it would, because I feel relaxed and in the right position when going off the jumps, and I'm already comfortable pulling the front wheel up and getting air off of little rollers and bumps and stuff when necessary or when I want to. I just want to make sure whether I should keep the throttle steady if I have enough speed, roll on it a bit on the face, or pin it completely.

Just looking for a bit of reassurance before I go out and kill myself my fourth time out on my KTM ๐Ÿ‘

It sounds like you need to commit to the jump; that maybe since you're new and a little intimidated, you're letting off the gas at the last second and that will cause a nosedive. Keep steady on the throttle.

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It sounds like you need to commit to the jump; that maybe since you're new and a little intimidated, you're letting off the gas at the last second and that will cause a nosedive. Keep steady on the throttle.

Actually the opposite. After being on here for a while, I've learned that letting off is a big no-no. I'm just going way too slow. In order to get both of my wheels level off the ground at the speed that I'm going, I'd basically have to loop out and bring it back. I'm just gonna try actually clearing one of the smaller ones next time I'm out. Which won't be for a while because I cracked the pinch bolt that holds the axle to the forks ๐Ÿ‘ and trying to find someone with competant aluminum welding skills is pretty hard around here.

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...

Just keep practicing, no advice you get here will make it any easier for you.

More seat time, that's all you need. ๐Ÿ‘

I'd second this and add one more piece. When you're on the takeoff ramp focus completely on the landing ramp, as soon as you can see it, focus on the lip and clear it. Remember: over-jumping usually hurts less than coming up short.

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To be honest... I was too lazy to read your entire post, but I will say this...

Just keep practicing, no advice you get here will make it any easier for you.

More seat time, that's all you need. ๐Ÿ‘

agreed...to be honest I never thought as deeply as some of you guys do on this forum haha...when I was a beginner I just kept riding and riding...had a few lessons with a pro and thats it...I mean there isnt a whole lot to it...it really isnt rocket science...some people never really get over that hump and consequently never get comfortable jumping...but I guess all I can really say is 1. hit the jump 2. be relaxed 3. stay centered....if the front end shoots up tap the back brake, if it goes down pin the shit out of the throttle haha

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agreed...to be honest I never thought as deeply as some of you guys do on this forum haha...when I was a beginner I just kept riding and riding...had a few lessons with a pro and thats it...I mean there isnt a whole lot to it...it really isnt rocket science...some people never really get over that hump and consequently never get comfortable jumping...but I guess all I can really say is 1. hit the jump 2. be relaxed 3. stay centered....if the front end shoots up tap the back brake, if it goes down pin the shit out of the throttle haha

For only riding a few times, I'm actually pretty comfortable jumping, just figured I'd clear up a couple things and save myself some unnecessary broken parts and/ or injuries along the way lol

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my buddy who just started riding did the same thing for a while and still does every once in a while, you just gotta keep a steady acceleration up the face of the jump and you will keep your front end up, i dont like trying to blip the throttle at the top of the jump

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my buddy who just started riding did the same thing for a while and still does every once in a while, you just gotta keep a steady acceleration up the face of the jump and you will keep your front end up, i dont like trying to blip the throttle at the top of the jump

I just need to go faster period lol. Next time I'm out I'm gonna try one of the smaller jumps.

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I see a whole lot o' injuries happpening here.

If you guys are just learning to jump... find a buddy or get someone at the track who knows what they are doing and ask them for help, a lesson so to speak. Ask them to watch you jump and tell you what you are doing wrong.

Just a few things I was taught when I first started jumping at the track

Body postioning is Rule #1. You should be on the balls of your feet - knees slightly bent and gripping the bike - standing with your arms at a 90 degree angle (attack postion) so if you looked down you can see your front number plate.

Rule #2 Keep the throttle steady all the way off the face of the jump.

Rule #3 Gas as soon as you land

Jumping a dirt bike is not like jumping a BMX bike - you dont pull up on the bars to get height or distance.

Now there are variations and differences once you get more experienced and start doing bigger jumps. And not all jumps are created equal.

Start with a "safe" tabletop that you can go as far and fast as you want and it doesn't matter. Start slow and build from there.

It really makes a difference when you take your time and get to know what the bike is gonna do and how to react to it on smaller jumps.

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I see a whole lot o' injuries happpening here.

If you guys are just learning to jump... find a buddy or get someone at the track who knows what they are doing and ask them for help, a lesson so to speak. Ask them to watch you jump and tell you what you are doing wrong.

Just a few things I was taught when I first started jumping at the track

Body postioning is Rule #1. You should be on the balls of your feet - knees slightly bent and gripping the bike - standing with your arms at a 90 degree angle (attack postion) so if you looked down you can see your front number plate.

Rule #2 Keep the throttle steady all the way off the face of the jump.

Rule #3 Gas as soon as you land

Jumping a dirt bike is not like jumping a BMX bike - you dont pull up on the bars to get height or distance.

Now there are variations and differences once you get more experienced and start doing bigger jumps. And not all jumps are created equal.

Start with a "safe" tabletop that you can go as far and fast as you want and it doesn't matter. Start slow and build from there.

It really makes a difference when you take your time and get to know what the bike is gonna do and how to react to it on smaller jumps.

In this case, I literally do need to just go faster though. The ramp is a short, steep kicker that ends up being a 25 foot double. I tried to get air off the first jump without going too far and casing the double. Doesn't work unless you pin it as your front wheel is coming off. Then I tried rolling over the first ramp and going off the second. Still need to roll on the throttle pretty good, but I can do that no problem and get pretty far for just accelerating about 15 feet in first gear. Next time out (won't be for another week or two thanks to a broken pinch bolt) I'll just see if I can build up to that jump by trying the smaller double.

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