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Swing arm help

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My rear sprocket bolts came loose and have worn a gouge and hole in my swing arm. Do you think I should replace or repair?

If repair has anyone got a 2nd hand?

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Edited by thenbc

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Pressure Washed - I would clean and re-grease the bearings for peace of mind...But definently going by your pics, i would replace that swingarm..OEM from Honda costs a fortune though, get used one

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You may want to take your sprocket off and inspect your hub. If those holes in the hub are elongated, you will never get new sprocket bolts to stay tight.

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Problem is that is right at a very critical, highly stressed section of the swingarm. You could probably get an experienced welder to reinforce that area, but I'd always be a little weary of that thing breaking.

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Problem is that is right at a very critical, highly stressed section of the swingarm. You could probably get an experienced welder to reinforce that area, but I'd always be a little weary of that thing breaking.

I had a nice "get off" some time ago. The swingarm payed the price. Yep it had a hole in it. I had a good welder take a look at making the repair. He said "NO WAY DUDE"! Replace it.

After replacing I know that peace of mind helps me to sleep at night. 👍

BTW, about 4 bills was the asking price (new), but my source is no longer available. Good luck on your search.

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I would have someone look at welding it before looking for a new one. A good weld should fix that up right!

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d00ds

the swing arm is T-6 heat treated..

welding will soften it

reheat treating it may miss-align it

get one off the ebay

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T-6. These heat-treatable metals have an ultimate tensile strength of 18,000 PSI to 58,000 PSI. They contain a small amount of magnesium and silicon—around 1.0 percent. They are used widely throughout the welding fabrication industry, predominantly in the form of extrusions, and incorporated in many structural components. Solution heat treatment improves their strength. These alloys are solidification crack-sensitive, and for this reason should not be arc welded autogenously (without filler material). The filler metal dilutes the base material, thereby preventing hot cracking. They are welded with both 4xxx and 5xxx filler materials, depending on the application and service requirements......

Not from my brain...obviously. I think a proper weld is worth a try but I'm a half-assed dimwit who's has great success with swing arm weld repairs much worse than that.🙂🤣:lol:👍

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Not from my brain...obviously. I think a proper weld is worth a try but I'm a half-assed dimwit who's has great success with swing arm weld repairs much worse than that.🙂🤣:lol:👍

been to google haven't ya...:applause:🤣

...6061-t6 is very weldable, however after welding, the properties near the weld area are typically that of 6061-t0, a loss of strength of around 50% or more...

YMMV

Edited by amazing ricardo
..CPR is a great call... ask chris he'll give you the straight poop..

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🙂🤣:applause: Yeah...I looked it up but still don't have the knowledge to understand it that much so I yield to those who know:worthy: I still think a weld would worth trying (unless I could find a good used swing arm cheap)👍🤣

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