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CR500 water cloud out the pipe

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I have a 89 cr500 that was running fine and then it starterd bogging when I cracked the gas. the bike idles fine and up to about 1/2 throttle things are fine but when you open her up you just get a steam cloud out the pipe. and sugestions on where to look would be great

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Probably a Leaking Head Gasket, I would also Check the Head for Warpage when changing the gasket.......If I'm wrong some one will chime in and say so....:thumbsup:.

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yea, if its a 'steam' cloud, more kinda whiteish with a distinked smell, i would check the head gasket, if it just started doing it, most likely no warpage. Take the head off find out. thers probably some coolant in the cylinder. Did you check if you were losing any coolant?

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Clean the air filter! Before removing the head drain the oil and look for white milky oil. It's the tell tale sign of a blown head gasket. If it just started the the air filter is dirty and the engine can't breathe above 1/2 throttle. The steam as you call it is fuel loading up and finally burning off at one big charge.

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Before removing the head drain the oil and look for white milky oil. It's the tell tale sign of a blown head gasket.

This isn't true. The crankcase and transmissions are seperate. Water leaking through the head gasket cannot get to the transmission.

On another note, I have blown a head gasket in the past. If any significant amount of water were entering the cylinder, it would just shut the bike down. Mine couldn't be started and would blow water out the overflow on the radiator every time I tried to kick start it.

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Clean the air filter! Before removing the head drain the oil and look for white milky oil. It's the tell tale sign of a blown head gasket. If it just started the the air filter is dirty and the engine can't breathe above 1/2 throttle. The steam as you call it is fuel loading up and finally burning off at one big charge.

ya, thats a water pump seal... Enless thats bad and a crank seal is bad and sucking oil threw there :thumbsup:

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I had a poorly sealed head gasket on my 98 CR500 from a poorly machined head. It was harder to start but did run and when I was a full throttle I was told that coolant was coming out the exhaust :-)

Not a smokey/steamy scenario like you describe though.

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i will get a new gasket today and keep you all posted. I took the head off and there are little drops of coolant all through the cylinder the head looks good so I am hoping the gasket will fix it

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You gotta make sure the flat sealing surfaces of the head and the cylinder are "flat" and not warped and/or corroded! It will just blow, again, if there's an issue there.

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should I send my head off somewhere to get it trued up on the mating surface

if so where should I send it

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You can check it yourself if you have a perfectly flat rule or surface. Otherwise you could send the cylinder and head somewhere to get checked and cleaned up. Any decent motorcycle shop or auto mechanic buddy can check it for free.

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This isn't true. The crankcase and transmissions are seperate. Water leaking through the head gasket cannot get to the transmission.

On another note, I have blown a head gasket in the past. If any significant amount of water were entering the cylinder, it would just shut the bike down. Mine couldn't be started and would blow water out the overflow on the radiator every time I tried to kick start it.

I stand corrected. Your right. Also you'll have some coolant on the cylinder and piston when removing the head. Drop the piston all the way down and have a look at the cylinder wall. You should see good cross hatch markings. Make sure there are no grooves or scratches that you can catch with your fingernail. Get a large sheet of 120 or higher grit sand paper and lay it flat on a sheet of glass and just glide the head on the paper in a figure 8. It will show you if you have a warped head with the tell tale area's that are not scratched up. What does the plug look like?

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