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Carb boot lube?

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To make it easier to re-install the carb could I safely use a lubricant on the boot/outside of the carb body? I was thinking about using PB Blaster very lightly, but I'm afraid of potential engine damage if some of it gets sucked in while running. Is that a reasonable concern? Is there anything else that would make more sense to use?

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i've never personally ever had to use any lubricant to ease the carb boots on.instead i use a mechanic's hose pick,available from any reputable tool supplier.looks like a cotter pin puller only much larger.you insert the pick between the boot and bell of the carb working around the circumfrence gently easing the boot on,kind of like using a shoe horn.

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I use a small amount of oil, just smeared inside the rubber boot. Makes it's east to get carb back in with no extra jiggery pokery, and absolutely zero chance of hurting anything.

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To make it easier to re-install the carb could I safely use a lubricant on the boot/outside of the carb body?

The engine burns hydrocarbons. That's what it does.

I spray WD40 inside the boots and on the carb. Once the engine warmed up it will all evaporate, whatever gets sucked through the engine will get burned away. It might interfere with starting the bike the first time--takes a little longer cranking than otherwise--but after that, no worries.

This ain't brain surgery. You don't need to work in a sterile environment only using Suzuki-approved or branded supplies from previously un-opened containers.

And a long-handled flat-head screw driver can be useful for prying the boot over the lip of the carb.

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I use a small amount of oil, just smeared inside the rubber boot. Makes it's east to get carb back in with no extra jiggery pokery, and absolutely zero chance of hurting anything.

Duh!:lol: Good call, I didn't even think of motor oil. I also like the idea of having a small amount of oil in any voidspace between the carb and boot to help catch any fine dust that may work its way in.

bumtarder, I didn't realize they made such a tool but it just makes sense. There's a tool for everything, and it always makes it easier to have the right one! Thanks for the insight. :thumbsup:

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The engine burns hydrocarbons. That's what it does.

I spray WD40 inside the boots and on the carb. Once the engine warmed up it will all evaporate, whatever gets sucked through the engine will get burned away. It might interfere with starting the bike the first time--takes a little longer cranking than otherwise--but after that, no worries.

This ain't brain surgery. You don't need to work in a sterile environment only using Suzuki-approved or branded supplies from previously un-opened containers.

And a long-handled flat-head screw driver can be useful for prying the boot over the lip of the carb.

I understand how it works, but I also understand you can put harmful chemicals into an engine and destroy it quickly (i.e. burns too hot). I was just hoping for a quick tip such as engine oil, hose pick tool, and flathead screwdriver. Thanks to all 3 of you!

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Use a quick spray of contact cleaner and it will slide right into place then evaporate away. If you use oil or any kind of lubricant it makes it that much easier to pull the boot off even when the clamp is tight.:thumbsup:

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I use an ultra thin layer of vasoline (petrolatum). If it is good enough for a babies a$$, it will be fine on your boot.

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Use a quick spray of contact cleaner and it will slide right into place then evaporate away. If you use oil or any kind of lubricant it makes it that much easier to pull the boot off even when the clamp is tight.:thumbsup:

There's no way the boot will pull off when tight even with oil or grease. And it helps repeat removals and refits without having to keep spraying stuff. Problem I found with stuff like contact cleaner is that it evaporates too quickly - I'm slow and I reckon the boot would be dry as a bone before I've got it even half on :lol:

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I heard that electrical contact cleaner has acids that etch the leads for a better conection that can harm rubber.

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I have a tube of silicone O-ring lube I use for such things.

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I have a tube of silicone O-ring lube I use for such things.

:thumbsup:

I'm just too cheap and disorganized to keep such things aound.

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