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how hot do motorcycle cases get?

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I am considering line-xing all my raw aluminum to make my bike look even more stealthy. the line-x is good until 300 F. is that enough for the drz case guards?

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That is probably really close. Why line ex them? Will be heavy, and lower resale value...paint them if you want them dark...

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That is probably really close. Why line ex them? Will be heavy, and lower resale value...paint them if you want them dark...

I am going to run this thing into the ground. I dont care. It looks cool and is tough as hell. paint on the skid and case savers will last a day. my feet will rub it off with a little dirt in between in no time.

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I am going to run this thing into the ground. I dont care. It looks cool and is tough as hell. paint on the skid and case savers will last a day. my feet will rub it off with a little dirt in between in no time.

I agree...although I would use herc cause you can do it yourself and it sticks to anything...case in point...plastic gas tanks...

IMAG0013.jpg

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herculiner

Tough stuff! I've used it for a number of things.... It would be a bitch undoing bolts and removing covers if you just painted it on though....

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Here is a bit of history: First on the scene were epoxy based products. They were not very durable, they cracked, peeled, etc. Then, ONE-part polyurethane products came along. One-part means that the polyurethane is suspended in a solvent. A catalyst is added which starts a chemical reaction that removes the solvent so that you have just polyurethane left. They were a significant improvement over epoxy based products. Examples of today’s one-part polyurethanes include Herculiner, Duplicolor, Durabak, and Speedliner. All of these are do-it-yourselfers and can be bought at a retail store except for Speedliner which has to be purchased through a dealer. The newest technology is TWO-part polyurethanes. Two-part means that a resin (usually a polyol resin) is mixed with isocyanate (a hardener) which renders the polyurethane. Two-part polyurethanes are harder and much more durable than one-part polyurethanes. Two-part polys are used on today’s boats, airplanes, etc. Examples of today’s products that have two-part polyurethanes include LINE-X and Rhino.

LINE-X and Rhino differ quite a bit. The biggest difference is that LINE-X contains polyurea and Rhino does not. Polyurea enhances the bedliner’s properties: 1. LINE-X's temperature tolerance is 250 degrees and Rhino's is 175. As the temperature of the bed approaches the temp tolerance, it loses its strength. 2. Polyurea keeps moisture out of the solution thus making a more dense and solid liner. Less moisture also means better adhesion. 3. Polyurea also makes for a harder liner. The tear strength of LINE-X is 304 pounds per linear inch (pli). Rhino is 145 pli. 4. Polyurea sets up very fast, that's one reason why LINE-X goes on with heat and high pressure. LINE-X dries in about 4 seconds, so you get an even application throughout the bed. Rhino takes a minute or so to even gel, an hour or so to dry. Before it gels, gravity can pull the liner from the top ridges in to the low valleys. Rhino’s Tuff Stuff goes on cold/low pressure and thus has that "cottage cheese" look. LINE-X’s high heat/high pressure gives it a very nice texture, it’s sort of like an orange peel. However, the dealer can vary the texture. 5. Polyurea makes the liner more chemical resistant, especially to organic oils and solvents.

LINE-X is the only brand with a NATIONWIDE lifetime warranty.

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Just for kicks I measured my case temps today after a ride. The bike had sat for maybe 10 minutes or so before I measured, so it had cooled some.

Left case at starter cluster = 167F

Left case over stator = 165F

Left radiator header = 157F

Right radiator header = 156F

Muffler (stock) = 160F

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I would be concerned that it might retain heat if painted on over the cases. Extra heat might bring about a slightly quicker failure of components. Just my opinion & you know what they say about opinions. Its your bike so do what you want.

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LINE-X and Rhino differ quite a bit. The biggest difference is that LINE-X contains polyurea and Rhino does not.

1. LINE-X's temperature tolerance is 250 degrees and Rhino's is 175.

2. Polyurea keeps moisture out of the solution thus making a more dense and solid liner.

3. Polyurea also makes for a harder liner. The tear strength of LINE-X is 304 pounds per linear inch (pli). Rhino is 145 pli.

4. Polyurea sets up very fast, that's one reason why LINE-X goes on with heat and high pressure. LINE-X dries in about 4 seconds, so you get an even application throughout the bed.

5. Polyurea makes the liner more chemical resistant, especially to organic oils and solvents.

LINE-X is the only brand with a NATIONWIDE lifetime warranty.

Lemme guess which company you work for....

But interesting info, none-the-less. Thanks.

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I measured 185 F as the highest temp. It was on the stator cover...

:thumbsup::thumbsup:

Erling

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I wonder if even though it's not at it's melting point if the liner will get tacky when it's at 180? Smell like chemicals badly when hot? I think it's a interesting idea so I'm not trying to shoot it down but I park my bike in my basement so I worry about that kind of stuff.

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Not sure about line-x but herc is good up to 250 or so before it becomes easy to scrape off and get stinky. I had to take some off a floorpan I was repairing and it was a bitch

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