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leaking front sprocket seal


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Alright, so I figured out my sprocket seal and o-rings are leaking. ( I had the chain to tight) But is it really that big of deal? Should I replace them right away? As long as I check the tranny fluid every couple rides, I change it out about every 5-7 rides anyway plus my chain is always lubed up ­čĹŹ

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Have you taken it apart yet?

You were going to take it apart, inspect and see if you needed any parts.

Look at the spacer/sleeve inside where it touches and seals on the seal and see if it has wear or grooves. If it is smooth you don't need to replace it. With all the dirt that it looks like you might have in there it is probably grooved and worn.

Those sound like all the parts except you probably don't need the stop ring. Again though, inspect first and decide.

Since you are talking about a stop ring I'm guessing it's a 200?

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Have you taken it apart yet?

You were going to take it apart, inspect and see if you needed any parts.

Look at the spacer/sleeve inside where it touches and seals on the seal and see if it has wear or grooves. If it is smooth you don't need to replace it. With all the dirt that it looks like you might have in there it is probably grooved and worn.

Those sound like all the parts except you probably don't need the stop ring. Again though, inspect first and decide.

Since you are talking about a stop ring I'm guessing it's a 200?

Its a 125 (same). I was just going to order the parts first and wait until they come in before I take it apart. But I guess its a pretty quick job so I may inspect/clean before I start ordering parts. Will I need to drain the tranny fluid first?

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I got tired of the ol' leaky countershaft. The remedy is to coat the bushing,shaft and back of sprocket with silicone. Put it all back together and smear silicone over the snap ring. Guaranteed to fix the leak:thumbsup: Found this out awhile back on a factory 250xc:thumbsup:

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I took off the orange metal cover that holds the chain from slipping off the sprocket (what is it called?) What is underneath that metal orange ktm cover, there were bearings and other stuff. I was able to move my sprocket side to side, it had a fair amount of free play, I don't think that is normal.

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How much play are we talking? If the countershaft drive bearing is bad,pretty sure you would be losing alot more oil. Try the simple things first. Replacing that bearing means splitting cases.Did you find shavings in the oil? Magnetic drain plug? When you have the seal out and the race-you can see the bearing/Giv it a good look over before deciding.If it has just a little play, I wouldn't be worried. If you have races and a season of riding-then it might be worth doing a rebuild. Thing is,once you open the motor,there is always a number of things necessary to replace.It can add up $ quickly.

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When I changed the oil a few days ago there were some shavings stuck to the magnetic part of the drain screw. Probably about 70% of the magnet had shavings sticking out. I thought this was normal wear? I didn't think anything of it until now. The sprocket moves side to side a good amount. I can see that its not snug at all against the outer clip that holds it on. Could I just find another one of those clips and shimmy it in there to tighten everything up?

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It shouldn't do that. The sprocket should be tight on the shaft and not wobble at all on a KTM and there should be no play between the sprocket and retainer clip like that RM. The bearing doesn't have anything to do with that.

The whole assembly could have some end play in it, with the sleeve moving in and out of the seal, if there is play in the bearing, but the clip should still hold the sprocket, collar, o-ring, and stop plate tight against the inner race of the bearing.

Move it around and see which it is.

My feeling is if you understand how it works, you can fix it, and you don't need to fill it full of glue. Sealant deters proper function of the o-ring and could make it hard to get apart next time. Next you will have to pull on the sleeve with vise grips to get it off the splines.

Filling something like that with sealant is crude at best to me. Since I am possibly headed down the slippery slope I will acknowledge the middle ground which is that these parts are not moving between each other, so glue could work, but goes against everything I know and is not necessary. However, I would be embarrassed to have sealant coming out of my sprocket. Just don't get it on the seal which is moving. But to each his own. I guess it would make a good conversation piece. I saw a guy with his counter shaft sprocket welded to the shaft on an XR and that was working too.

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Gary jp4 thanks for your insight. So good news is that it doesn't appear to be my bearings, thats a big relief because that entails splitting the case plus $$. Now when I first bought this bike used, I tightened the chain up pretty good (I had not received the owners manual yet) I mean when the bike was on the ground there was barely any play in the chain. I only rode it like this maybe an hour, before I realized it wasn't right. Since then it has started leaking slowly and over time (3 weeks) gotten a little worse.

All of the play appears to be between the sprocket and retrainer clip not in the actual assembly itself, but I will check it more thoroughly tomorrow morning. I don't plan on filling it full of silicone that didn't sound right to me either.

So by replacing these parts that should fix the "play"

SHAFT SEAL RING

O-RING

SPACER BUSHING

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