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Buying a 1992 RM250 - What do I need to know?

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Hey guys, I have the chance to pick up what seems to be a nice 92 RM250.. Problem is I know nothing about suzuki's RM's other than they're yellow LOL I own older Hondas and Can-ams..

Is there any particular year that is best to stay away from? Are the engines in these bikes fairly decent? I know my old can-ams are virtually bulletproof.. I don't want to get into something that will be a pain in the butt and need rebuilding every year or 2 which seems the norm with newer bikes.. I always wondered why that is??? Must be the owner running the piss out of them without the proper oil/fuel mixture..

This 92 seems fairly decent and sounds like it runs good.. Also finding parts for this bike shouldn't be that bad since it's a 92 ??

Any advice would be great

thanks:thumbsup:

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By rebuild, what do you mean? total rebuild or just topend rebuilds?

You will have to do topends on a regular basis depending how hard you ride. The bike is going on 20 yrs old so some parts will be harder to find.

good luck.

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by rebuild I was referring to top ends.. I always wondered why the newer liquid cooled bikes always needed to be freshened more often than the old air cooled.. I have seen so many bikes that are just a few years old that have had "new top end" or "freshened top ends".. Must be the way they ride or the way they mix their oil or jetting..

As for the transmission and rest of the engine, are the RM250's fairly rugged?

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I have a guy riding a harescramble series on a 94 rmx , and it does finish the race. But is quite outdated. He has carb issues 1/2 the time . Personally , I would get a 96 and above. The bike you are looking at has case reed induction...1/2 of a subframe , goofy ergonomics , etc. Just old.

Why do I put in a new top-end every year........because I do not want any problems for 1 year .....and when I get on my 2005 chainsaw , plunk out 50-75 in fees to race.....I do run the "piss" out of my bike.

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so when you guys say you're putting in new top ends do you mean you're just putting in new piston and rings or are you boring the cylinder every time? I can't see having to bore it every year or 2, that's ridiculous.

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I just put in rings on the original piston......and when december rolls around , it will get a new stock piston , rings , wrist pin , and wrist pin bearing....yes , I honed the cylinder lightly. I do not anticipate any bore jobs or .10/.20 pistons ...etc.

So yes , just the $100 dollar top end........have you seen what a new clutch pack runs these days ???? they went from $100 10 years ago....to nearly $200 now !! for the exact same parts . ( Barnett , I am referring to ).

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i'd go to a newer year model, like in the 2000's, they've really come a long way as far as durabilty, design, and parts availability is better. but if its cheap enough and runs well, try it out, you can always go newer in the future.

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regardless of brand, model, year, air cooled or water cooled topends need to be changed on a regular basis if you are running them. Some people get more hrs out of them than most. I certainly get more hrs out of my topends than a pro or expert rider who probably changes top ends every race weekend. I also bet that I change my piston and rings way more than someone that scoots around on trails.

I had an aircooled CR60 that needed a piston and rings every 5 races according to the manual. My current 2006 RM250 recommends rings every 5 races and a new piston and rings every 10 races. Of course thats using OEM parts. I get about 50+hrs out of a Wiseco Piston and ring kit racing MX.

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I bought a 91 RM 250,.. al I could afford and I wanted to ride,.. The worst part about it,.. all the people who own newer ones telling you to get this upgrade or that upgrade or to get a newer one..when they have NO clue about your finances or what not. I have been happy with the bike and wrenching on it.. Yes I would LOVE to have a newer bike, who wouldn't??? but you can get what you get.. Hope you like wrenching on them, because with the older ones you'll do it alot,.. Be preapared to be bearing and sealed to death for purchasing and replacing them.

Parts - I go through my local Suzuki dealership, they have all the diagrams and get the parts in 3 business days with no shipping costs. I would HIGHLY recommend you get a bolt/washer kit ASAP! it will cost you more than the kit in 4 -5 bolts from dealer.

You can PM anytime if you have questions on where to get stuff for the thing, I have an extensive bookmark list of pages I frequent for parts, info, etc..

Good luck and happy biking!!! 👍

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Yes I would LOVE to have a newer bike, who wouldn't??? but you can get what you get.. Hope you like wrenching on them, because with the older ones you'll do it alot

I don't see why you need to work on older bikes any more than you would a newer bike. It all has to do with maintenance. If you get an older bike that wasn't very well taken care, then you will be playing catch up and wrenching all the time. But, once that old bike is in like new condition, just proper maintenance is all that is needed. Bearings and seals are all a part of owning a bike, as long as you keep the pressure washer away from them, they shouldn't crap out too fast.

Just because you are on a budget doesn't mean you have to buy an old POS bike. Just be diligent and very critical with every bike you go check out before you make a final decision. I lucked out with my bike. Fresh from the ground up. I personally couldn't have found a better deal. I didn't think the guy was actually going to let me take it, he was having a hard time letting it go.

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I don't see why you need to work on older bikes any more than you would a newer bike. It all has to do with maintenance. If you get an older bike that wasn't very well taken care, then you will be playing catch up and wrenching all the time. But, once that old bike is in like new condition, just proper maintenance is all that is needed. Bearings and seals are all a part of owning a bike, as long as you keep the pressure washer away from them, they shouldn't crap out too fast.

Just because you are on a budget doesn't mean you have to buy an old POS bike. Just be diligent and very critical with every bike you go check out before you make a final decision. I lucked out with my bike. Fresh from the ground up. I personally couldn't have found a better deal. I didn't think the guy was actually going to let me take it, he was having a hard time letting it go.

I see your point and will not argue, the chances of finding a great deal on an affordable NON POS bike is slim, but great if you can find one. Wrench on it?? well, as metal flexes from use over time, things rattle loose so yes, you'll need to put in time to replace or tighten bolts, etc. Older bikes, I don't care who you are, you are going to have to replace the seals and bushings eventually, unless again, the person in front of you already did it... it's called age, they wear out.

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It depends on what type of riding you do. If its a good deal and it appears to be in good shape go for it. I have a 90 RM250 as a second bike and it is great for the family rides and trails. They are a lot plusher at lower speeds then the newer bikes, but when the speeds go up, the newer bikes shine.

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by rebuild I was referring to top ends.. I always wondered why the newer liquid cooled bikes always needed to be freshened more often than the old air cooled.. I have seen so many bikes that are just a few years old that have had "new top end" or "freshened top ends".. Must be the way they ride or the way they mix their oil or jetting..

As for the transmission and rest of the engine, are the RM250's fairly rugged?

I had a 92 RM250 good reliable bike, though for a few more pennies Id try to find an 05 or up. Possibbly the best all around dirt bike ever made.

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Hey guys, I have the chance to pick up what seems to be a nice 92 RM250.. Problem is I know nothing about suzuki's RM's other than they're yellow LOL I own older Hondas and Can-ams..

Is there any particular year that is best to stay away from? Are the engines in these bikes fairly decent? I know my old can-ams are virtually bulletproof.. I don't want to get into something that will be a pain in the butt and need rebuilding every year or 2 which seems the norm with newer bikes.. I always wondered why that is??? Must be the owner running the piss out of them without the proper oil/fuel mixture..

This 92 seems fairly decent and sounds like it runs good.. Also finding parts for this bike shouldn't be that bad since it's a 92 ??

Any advice would be great

thanks:thumbsup:

BTW, what's the asking price? I am going to more than likely sell my 91 RM 250. troubled times ahead as I am a county employee and pay cuts are coming.

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