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new boots, and the gearshift lever


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:banana:

Context: I'm a new dirtbike rider, first pair of dirtbike boots ever.

Bought new boots and it is now impossible to shift gears. The ankle is too stiff and the foot part is too thick to get under the lever. I re-positioned the gearshift lever higher, but it feels just terrible (what little I can feel through the *@#& boot)! Does one simply get used to it, or did I buy too cheap of a boot ($130 Thor)? I imagine that with time, the boot will become more flexible and I'll get used to the higher gearshift position, but at the moment I feel pretty discouraged.

🙂

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:banana:

Context: I'm a new dirtbike rider, first pair of dirtbike boots ever.

Bought new boots and it is now impossible to shift gears. The ankle is too stiff and the foot part is too thick to get under the lever. I re-positioned the gearshift lever higher, but it feels just terrible (what little I can feel through the *@#& boot)! Does one simply get used to it, or did I buy too cheap of a boot ($130 Thor)? I imagine that with time, the boot will become more flexible and I'll get used to the higher gearshift position, but at the moment I feel pretty discouraged.

🙂

Looking at the pic for your avatar, are you riding a Honda CRF230F? What size boot are you wearing?

I would highly recommend getting a longer shifter, such as the BBR.

http://www.bbrmotorsports.com/products/products.aspx

The longer shifter will definitely help. Make sure you have the position of the shifter correct. Beyond that, you have to learn to shift by feeling the engagement of the gears. Any motocross boot will limit your ability to feel the actual shift lever, so you learn to sense the engagement of the gears. Eventually, it does become second nature. The CRF150F/CRF230F forum here at TT has lots of good info. The stock shifter is known to be too short for most riders so is frequently swapped out for a longer aftermarket shifter. I bet it will help a bunch!

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Yes, a longer gearshift lever sounds like the solution. The bike is a CRF230f, and my boot size is 14! About how much longer is the aftermarket lever? I can simply get the stock lever lengthened by welding a piece of metal in the middle.

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with them being a new pair of boots, it will be bad,but they'll break in and like everybody said, you'll get used to it. I can say though, try using the edge of the sole on the side of the boot.... know what I mean? kinda hard to explain. lol Thats what I do and it works rather well. just my little tip...

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with them being a new pair of boots, it will be bad,but they'll break in and like everybody said, you'll get used to it. I can say though, try using the edge of the sole on the side of the boot.... know what I mean? kinda hard to explain. lol Thats what I do and it works rather well. just my little tip...

I agree with this. With a size 14 boot, your best bet is to learn to shift using the side/edge of your boot.

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Yes, a longer gearshift lever sounds like the solution. The bike is a CRF230f, and my boot size is 14! About how much longer is the aftermarket lever? I can simply get the stock lever lengthened by welding a piece of metal in the middle.

Wow! The BBR shifter is only 1/2 inch longer than stock, it might help a little, but with 14 boots, you might be better off lengthening the stock shifter. Obviously, you don't want to lengthen it so much that it is sticking out too far or it will be more vulnerable to damage.

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with them being a new pair of boots, it will be bad,but they'll break in and like everybody said, you'll get used to it. I can say though, try using the edge of the sole on the side of the boot.... know what I mean? kinda hard to explain. lol Thats what I do and it works rather well. just my little tip...

Gluing/screwing a side "extension" onto the edge of the sole to facilitate this may work.

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🤣

Context: I'm a new dirtbike rider, first pair of dirtbike boots ever.

Bought new boots and it is now impossible to shift gears. The ankle is too stiff and the foot part is too thick to get under the lever. I re-positioned the gearshift lever higher, but it feels just terrible (what little I can feel through the *@#& boot)! Does one simply get used to it, or did I buy too cheap of a boot ($130 Thor)? I imagine that with time, the boot will become more flexible and I'll get used to the higher gearshift position, but at the moment I feel pretty discouraged.

:banana:

I feel your pain. I have size 12s with plastic where the shifter is. Dumbest idea ever. 🤣

I was used to leather shoes or boots where I could feel the lever. After buying these I had to learn how to feel for the shifter and to recognize when I had/had not shifted. There *is* still feeling from the shifter but it takes a little time for your brain to adjust. Once the brain adapts it will be 2nd nature.

FWIW, it's definitely not the price of your boots, I have Alpinstar Tech 8s. $$$

If anything I think the more expensive boots have more armor and make it tougher.

The best thing you can do is ride. 🤣 With your large feet it will be tougher but you will get used to them. 🙂

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I have a TTR-230 and a pair of Fox F3's.

They're stiff as anything when new, but I figured, I gotta wear em. So I went on a ride day and basically just got used to them. When your concentrating on riding, the shifting kinda just happens....

I was discouraged at first also, but now I wouldn't ride with out them.

So basically, keep your chin up, put your boots on, and ride ! Trust me, it'll work out.

If you really want to, you can search the internet for a few break in methods, but I've found none to work 100% . I've got about 5 days of riding in my new boots, and they're awesome to wear now. 🙂

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i have had many pairs of boots, the SIDI Crossfire is AMAZING. It is a hinged boot, so NO BREAK IN needed. I felt like i had been riding with these boots for months the FIRST ride. Expensive does not always mean more protection, and cheap boots (those you got are cheap.. ) will beel like a concrete block around your feet with no movement. They may break in, maybe they never will. I have gotten 2 other buddies to switch and they love the crossfire boot. Not cheap.. but makes the diff. between enjoying riding or not.

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Like others have said, it will work out, keep rideing and wearing them. I went through it, then i had to convince my girlfriend to keep wearing them, then her son. Now we all agree, you get so use to it, you feel naked going back to a regular shoe.

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Went riding today, with a strip of plastic screwed to the inside of the left boot's sole to create more of a ledge to shift with. It worked out pretty well. Shifting up was more of a lift of the whole foot and leg instead of just flexing the ankle. I had more of a problem with the other side, not finding the brake sometimes. I'll lower the rear brake lever so the boot will stay over it instead of beside.

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Went riding today, with a strip of plastic screwed to the inside of the left boot's sole to create more of a ledge to shift with. It worked out pretty well. Shifting up was more of a lift of the whole foot and leg instead of just flexing the ankle. I had more of a problem with the other side, not finding the brake sometimes. I'll lower the rear brake lever so the boot will stay over it instead of beside.

I'm thinking you have another problem and it's with your riding technique.

Try to ride with the balls of your feet on the pegs. If you don't your toes can point down below the frame of the bike and catch on obstacles.

You can google it if you wish and look for other riding techniques as well.

That should help with the shifter, the brake, and save you from a painful injury.

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I'm thinking you have another problem and it's with your riding technique.

Try to ride with the balls of your feet on the pegs. If you don't your toes can point down below the frame of the bike and catch on obstacles.

You can google it if you wish and look for other riding techniques as well.

That should help with the shifter, the brake, and save you from a painful injury.

Thanks for your suggestion, but I've ridden with an experienced rider and he hasn't noticed a riding technique problem, it's just big boots.

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i feel your pain... i wear a size 14 boot also but im on a yz250f. it just takes time to get used to it. i have had mine for months and i still will miss a gear and im not as fast on the shifter. trade up for a longer shifter, and take a few long hard rides.

i put hose clamps on my shifter, it seems to help.

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