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WR250F New Rider, First Ride!


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Well, I just got back from my WR250F's maiden journey. Being my first time riding a dirt bike I was trying to be a little cautious, this is until I sunk it into 2 feet of mud (covered by 2 feet of water! :banana: ), then hit some sand dunes and banks (couldn't find any actual dirt trails unfortunately). I gotta say I loved it! While sand is a pain in the ass to deal with (I swerved all over the place and dumped it 2 dozen times), I can already tell this bike will be loads of fun when I get better at it. One more thing for the new riders though, while I agree the bike IS really plugged up, get a feel for it before you go power crazy. I didn't even get mine out of first the whole trip. Later I will defiantly do some more modifications but as of right now I'll learn to deal with the power the bike already is giving me. Long story short, I love my Yamaha! 🙂

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they are nice bikes. i was looking at one but im too short. i ended up getting the RMZ 250. just dumped it today myself. have fun on your new bike.

The RMZ250 was on my short list for a bike, along with the CRF250. Picked the Yamaha based on reviews and comfort when I sat on them. Suspension is great! Can't wait to jump it haha.

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The RMZ250 was on my short list for a bike, along with the CRF250. Picked the Yamaha based on reviews and comfort when I sat on them. Suspension is great! Can't wait to jump it haha.

im 16 and weigh abot 140lbs. i was also looking at a 2005 crf250...but it was in Virginia. i found my rmz in my state. and as long as you get the suspension set up to your weight its like riding on a pillow. my front forks are still a little stiff for me tho. but i love my bike.

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1st gear is only used for creeping through really slow tech stuff. Hopefully you werent over rev'n a ton...

Oh yeah, and faster is easier when going through sand, too slow and the front digs in...

The only time I was really revving it was trying to get out of a turn. Also, it wasn't my front tire that I was having an issue with, it was the fact that the back was swerving and whipping everywhere.

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You should check out The "Dirt Wise" DVD's by Shane Watts they will be very helpful. Also check out the "riding techniques" forum here on TT. You are in for a ton of fun so don't get discouraged by a few falls. We all fall, just make sure to get all the riding gear that you can afford. Boots, helmet, goggles, and gloves immediately. Good luck and keep asking questions, the riders here are happy to help, we all were newbies at some point.

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Congrats on the bike. Set your sag (http://www.tootechracing.com/suspension_tips.htm) and set up the compression and rebound for your riding style and terrain. Will make a good bike even more great!

Hi Yamalink.

The link you posted is a good one but it absolutly has to be used in conjunction with the Static sag measurement, the next link on ole RJ's webpage. its the only way to determine if you have the correct spring rate for the riders weight.

If you adjust the sag with the rider as stated in the first link you posted then get off the bike and the spring tops out with no static sag then you need a heavyer spring rate. Having both procedures on the same page with an explination of how they are related to each other in my opinion would be a good idea.

http://www.tootechracing.com/Static%20Sag%20Suspension%20Tip.htm

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Yamalink and motoglide, thank you both for the links! I just measured and have a 20" distance with the wheel in the air and a 17.25" when I'm on the bike. What exactly does a difference of 2.75" mean? I know it is not within the 3.75"-4.25" range but does this mean I can lower the shock?

You should check out The "Dirt Wise" DVD's by Shane Watts they will be very helpful. Also check out the "riding techniques" forum here on TT. You are in for a ton of fun so don't get discouraged by a few falls. We all fall, just make sure to get all the riding gear that you can afford. Boots, helmet, goggles, and gloves immediately. Good luck and keep asking questions, the riders here are happy to help, we all were newbies at some point.

This is very true indy rider and on the topic of gear, I burned the hell out of my leg yesterday when I tipped and my calf touched the exhaust near the kickstart (I was wearing pants). Any helpful gear to prevent against this happening again (with the exception of boots that I can't stand)? And assuming you live near Indianapolis, any good spots to ride that are north of you (I live near Gary)? Thanks!

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Yamalink and motoglide, thank you both for the links! I just measured and have a 20" distance with the wheel in the air and a 17.25" when I'm on the bike. What exactly does a difference of 2.75" mean? I know it is not within the 3.75"-4.25" range but does this mean I can lower the shock?

This is very true indy rider and on the topic of gear, I burned the hell out of my leg yesterday when I tipped and my calf touched the exhaust near the kickstart (I was wearing pants). Any helpful gear to prevent against this happening again (with the exception of boots that I can't stand)? And assuming you live near Indianapolis, any good spots to ride that are north of you (I live near Gary)? Thanks!

I believe you need to raise the adjuster rings up. While you are on it the shock is only compressing 2.75" when it should be compressing 4" (+/- .25"). The farther down the adjuster rings are set, the stiffer the spring gets and it doesn't compress as much when you get on it. You need to soften the spring, by raising the adj rings, so it's able to compress more. Ideally 4" (+/- .25").

No if and or buts about, you need to wear boots! I don't even like to kick start my bike w/o boots, bashing your shin on the foot pegs hurts like hell. Ride a quad if you don't plan to wear boots. Riding pants are also necessary and they have leather pads to prevent leg burns. I just recently added a FMF heat shield because I got tired of burning $100+ pants. The bike is just the first part of the equation, gear is next. If you're injured you can't ride and that sucks. Just wait, next come modifications to the bike like good skid plates, radiator braces, exhaust and better tires, not to mention fixing the broken parts from falls. It gets expensive.

I'm actually on the west side of the state. If you ever want to meet up and ride Redbird SRA in Duggar or the Badlands, which is more north up in Attica, let me know.

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