Jump to content

front wheel problem, tire doesnt line up with fender


Recommended Posts

ok heres my problem. when you line up the center knobs on the front tire with the front fender, they dont line up... when looking at the front tire fron straight on, the tire is like 1/4 inch to the right. (its not the fender)

so im thinking that years ago when I took apart my front hub to do the bearings for the first time and got everything backwards and thought I fixed it... well maybe it wasnt quite fixed and still something was in wrong?

should the axle be flush with the lower fork axle pinch clamp?

even if I were to get my front tire to move over to the left to line up with the fender then the brake rotor would then rub on the brake caliper and the caliper would need to be moved over. I am already getting uneven front pad wear (and rear for that matter)

also, my forks seem stiff... like theyre pinched in the fork tubes a tiny bit. maybe im not heavy enough, maybe theyre not set right, but sometimes when letting down from a wheelie and other things it feels very hard... like theres no suspension at all or its cranked right up.

so, what do you guys think it could be? I dont notice it when riding its just when looking at it on the stand, and the uneven front brake pad wear so maybe I should just quit worrying?

thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What bike is this? You mentioned in your post about wheel bearings that you have DNA wheels, is this one of those? There are a couple posibilities. The most likely posibility is that you switched the wheel spacers from side to side by accident. As far as the uneven brake wear, almost every bike has floating calipers, so it is likely that either your slider pins are frozen up, or if your wheel spacers are indeed switched, the slider pins are bottomed out to one side to account for the offset wheel.

As for fork spacing, loosen the pinch bolts on the fork lugs, loosen the axle nut, then hold the nut in place with a wrench while spinning the axle until the nut is tight. This will automatically set the fork spacing to the required neutral position. Then tighten the pinch bolts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What bike is this? You mentioned in your post about wheel bearings that you have DNA wheels, is this one of those? There are a couple posibilities. The most likely posibility is that you switched the wheel spacers from side to side by accident. As far as the uneven brake wear, almost every bike has floating calipers, so it is likely that either your slider pins are frozen up, or if your wheel spacers are indeed switched, the slider pins are bottomed out to one side to account for the offset wheel.

As for fork spacing, loosen the pinch bolts on the fork lugs, loosen the axle nut, then hold the nut in place with a wrench while . This will automatically set the fork spacing to the required neutral position. Then tighten the pinch bolts.

yes they are DNA wheels. I will double check the spacers and seized fork slider pins tonight after supper and I will also check the fork settings and report back with pictures.

I dont quite understand what you mean when you say " spinning the axle until the nut is tight"... how do I spin the axle? should the axle be flush with the fork lug? Mine is inside of the fork lug approx 1mm... pictures will be up within 60-90 minutes.

thanks for the help, appreciate it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yes they are DNA wheels. I will double check the spacers and seized fork slider pins tonight after supper and I will also check the fork settings and report back with pictures.

I dont quite understand what you mean when you say " spinning the axle until the nut is tight"... how do I spin the axle? should the axle be flush with the fork lug? Mine is inside of the fork lug approx 1mm... pictures will be up within 60-90 minutes.

thanks for the help, appreciate it.

The end of the axle should be an internal hex shape to take a giant allen wrench. There is a tool made that fits in this so that you can spin the axle with a wrench. If you have no way of spinning the axle then you can try loosening the pinch bolts and pushing up and down on the front end to compress the forks. I have found this isn't quite as effective, but does work fairly well. Where the axle sits in the fork lug varies from bike to bike, some hang out a mm or so, some sit flush, some are sunk in a mm or so.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Its not the alignment of the wheel in the fork lugs its the upper tubes twisted in the triple clamps. Put your bike on a stand and get the weight off the front wheel. Now that you have your wheel aligned you need to loosen up one side. quick Q, does your axle thread into the lug or does it have a nut? If it threads in, you need to loosen the clamp on the other side, dont make it floppy just loosen up each nut. If your bike has a nut on the axle, loosen up the lug bolts opposite the nut side. Now you need to loosen your LOWER triple clamp bolts, dont touch the top ones. Now you need to have a buddy hold the front wheel between his legs and clamp with his knees and hands to keep the wheel form moving. Now you need to sit on the bike and grab the bars and wiggle them violently back and forth. This untwists the forks and makes them straight and thus will straighten your fender. Now after your done twisting the forks, check the alignment of the fender. Is it straight? is no try again. If yes tighten up the lower triple first, then realign your axle and tighten that all back up and youll be good to go!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Its not the alignment of the wheel in the fork lugs its the upper tubes twisted in the triple clamps. Put your bike on a stand and get the weight off the front wheel. Now that you have your wheel aligned you need to loosen up one side. quick Q, does your axle thread into the lug or does it have a nut? If it threads in, you need to loosen the clamp on the other side, dont make it floppy just loosen up each nut. If your bike has a nut on the axle, loosen up the lug bolts opposite the nut side. Now you need to loosen your LOWER triple clamp bolts, dont touch the top ones. Now you need to have a buddy hold the front wheel between his legs and clamp with his knees and hands to keep the wheel form moving. Now you need to sit on the bike and grab the bars and wiggle them violently back and forth. This untwists the forks and makes them straight and thus will straighten your fender. Now after your done twisting the forks, check the alignment of the fender. Is it straight? is no try again. If yes tighten up the lower triple first, then realign your axle and tighten that all back up and youll be good to go!

the bike is a 2005 crf 450r. the axle has a weak ass aluminum nut that weighs about a gram.

very interesting. this makes sense as I just installed a SUB stabilizer and had to take my tubes out... alone, on the stand, with handlebars off, and front tire off so it was off weight on the stand... ugh, it was a nightmare!! the handlebars were straight "up and down" but they needed to be moved 3/4 of an inch to the left that I noticed at the last second out on the trail!! I wouldnt be surprised if the tubes were also crooked too!

another bit of info that might help: this one really pisses me off... I use the seal savers on my forks, the black neoprene socks (theyre awesome). and my left fork guard is pulled back by the brake line, it rubs against that seal saver sock and rips the HELL out of it!!!! I have tried everything except melting and reforming the fork guard to stop this and nothing has worked. it might be the fork tubes that are twisted?

I will try what you say when I have access to my bike stand.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Every bike that has that style axle has an aluminum nut. Has nothing to do with it, to be frank and honest. your triple clamp is the thing that is actually twisted here, lets make sure we dont mess that up for twisted forks. the top one is independent of the bottom one and if you take the bars off, forks out and you slap the triple clamps side to side without the forks in there the upper one will become misaligned to the bottom one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The forks could be twisted in the clamps, but that shouldn't lead to you caliper or fork guard problems.

The axle nut doesn't really need to hold much, the axle pinch bolts aid the aluminum nut.

Just removing and reinstalling the forks individually will line them up, they really don't get misaligned unless there's force twisting them. After checking that they are lined up, follow what KJ said and let the forks find their natural position on the axle so they don't bind.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your right the misaligned clamps will only straighten the fender. The guard sadly has to be replaced or reshaped. Is the brake line too short? If it is you can buy a brake line guide that attaches to your number plate and that helps take tension off the fork guard...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As long as your steering stem is not too tight, you should have no problem with twisted fork tubes, unless you had a "get-off". I would take apart or atleast loosen all front fork clamps and axel bolts. If the tubes got twisted during a fall this will allow them to "relax" in the clamps.

You tighten the triple clamps first, then, with the front axel nut tight and pinch bolts loose you need to bounce on the bike to allow the fork tubes to align them selves on the front axel, then tighten the pinch clamps. This is exactly how it is described in the owners manual.

Good Luck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That first step of letting them relax is probably a good idea...I still believe in whipping the bars back and forth while someone holds the wheel. If the forks have been cocked for a while they will be hard to straighten as they will take the shape of the twist they were in, slightly

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wait, I took the initial post as the wheel points straight, but is off center between the forks. If the wheel is pointing off to one side then yes, the forks are twisted in the clamps, if the wheel points straight forward then this is not the case. In what way does the wheel not "line up"?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wait, I took the initial post as the wheel points straight, but is off center between the forks. If the wheel is pointing off to one side then yes, the forks are twisted in the clamps, if the wheel points straight forward then this is not the case. In what way does the wheel not "line up"?

yes the wheel is straight. I took a string and lined up and down the dead center of the fender, I even measured both sides of the string with a digital micrometer.. it was accurate to the mm. the string hung off the very tip of the front fender and straight down... but it didnt land on the center of the tire!!!! the tire needs to be moved toward the left when looking straight on (needs to be moved towards side of bike that has front + rear brake levers)... but if I were to move is that way, it would not agree with the brake caliper as there is only .5mm on that side (see pics) and about 3mm on the other side before it touches.

pics might be a little dirty.. its a 05 crf450r with 250+ hours that gets ridden 20-30 hours a month.

14uhrba.jpg

2ypglev.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

your caliper is floating which means it moves side to side when the rotor flexs, so dont think you wont get the offset centered on the caliper if you move the wheel. Is it possible the wheel spacers are different width?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

your caliper is floating which means it moves side to side when the rotor flexs, so dont think you wont get the offset centered on the caliper if you move the wheel. Is it possible the wheel spacers are different width?

yes they are different width. the caliper definitely isnt floating right now, it seems seized, I will tackle it tomorrow.

anyways, I did what someone mentioned: loosened the axle nut and fork pinch bolts. the forks still seemed very stiff at the beginning of the stroke, and didnt want to rebound the last 2 inches im not much of a suspension guy to this kinda worries me.

I took the tire off and a fork leg out and it worked fine.. pretty stiff though trying to pogo just one leg on the ground. loosened only the top cap and poured out 400ml of diarrhea colored fluid. theres too much fluid in there. I am going to try putting 340ml of 5wt oil. the manual recommends:

approx 320ml - soft

approx 370 - normal

approx 420 - hard

also, I checked the manual... this fork fluid has approx 75 hours on it and is 5wt. I use seal savers, the seals are not leaking (I did them and am very proud!)they are 100% perfect still. I think its from the seal savers. the forks look new and have 200-250 hours.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

People keep saying the forks could be twisted in the clamps, but I dont understand how this could possibly turn the wheel at strange anges. This is because the silver fork tubes can turn freely in the upper fork tubes. I could be wrong, but I just need someone to explain how it works.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what happens is that the forks which connect to the wheel become twisted, one forward, one backward. Since the lower tubes can rotate, they do to keep the wheel straight but the lower triple clamp is twisted to the left or right and since thats where the fender mounts the fender becomes cocked left or right and then you have this goofy looking bike.

You may need to take the caliper off, pull the pads out, clean it up some and put grease on the slidingpins. Its prime to do this when you buy a new bike.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what happens is that the forks which connect to the wheel become twisted, one forward, one backward. Since the lower tubes can rotate, they do to keep the wheel straight but the lower triple clamp is twisted to the left or right and since thats where the fender mounts the fender becomes cocked left or right and then you have this goofy looking bike.You may need to take the caliper off, pull the pads out, clean it up some and put grease on the slidingpins. Its prime to do this when you buy a new bike.

Indeed haha

CRF150RB006-1-1.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yep! lol. thats twisted. I find mini bikes twist easily, thanks to the smaller fork diameter and clamping surface. I hear some little kids are so fast that they cant run stock clamps because they will just twist them when they turn. Someone sells som clamps for your bike that have a three bolt lower clamp and huge clamping surface to keep that to a minimum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

×
×
  • Create New...