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Shorter shock, how to balance the front?


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I have a Beta 525 RR. I just bought a used shock that was shortened 1.5' (not the shock but makes the bike is that much lower, as it works through a linkage).

I was thinking of making a front and back measurement before and after, then just lowering my forks to the bike has the same rake. Does this seem like a good way to try and get things in balance.

I see a lot of threads where people have spacers put in the front end when the shorten the rear shock, but why do I care if I have an extra 1.5" of travel in my front? I do not understand why somebody want to limit front end travel when they have limited the rear travel by shortening a shock?

I would be happy to get an education, if there is a good technical reason for this. With the steering stabilizer under my bars, I have 2" I can raise the forks without hitting anything. I know a lot of bike are not this way. Therefore I suspect this is the reason?

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  • 2 weeks later...
I have a Beta 525 RR. I just bought a used shock that was shortened 1.5' (not the shock but makes the bike is that much lower, as it works through a linkage).

I was thinking of making a front and back measurement before and after, then just lowering my forks to the bike has the same rake. Does this seem like a good way to try and get things in balance.

I see a lot of threads where people have spacers put in the front end when the shorten the rear shock, but why do I care if I have an extra 1.5" of travel in my front? I do not understand why somebody want to limit front end travel when they have limited the rear travel by shortening a shock?

I would be happy to get an education, if there is a good technical reason for this. With the steering stabilizer under my bars, I have 2" I can raise the forks without hitting anything. I know a lot of bike are not this way. Therefore I suspect this is the reason?

As Terry said with sliding the forks up, some of the early 80's forks can go up 2.5". The reason you normally match the front by using shorter springs and rebound spacers to keep the spring loaded is to stop the otherwise resultant chopper effect on the forks which slows steering and lengthens trail which makes the steering heavier, the other effect is landing back wheel first from a jump means the forks will be even flatter with the ground and won't absorb the landing properly when the front wheel hits, front wheel landings will be sweet though.

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