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Crf150f chain question


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I took the white chain guard thingy off of my crf150f, and I was wondering if I have to worry about my chain derailing just from going fast?...do I have to worry about my chain derailing if my chain does not hit a log or something?

All help is appreciated...thanks

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Nah it wont come off just because you don't have that chain guard

the chain guard is to protect your sprocket as well as protect your limbs when you crash..

Many people lose fingers from going down, and having their hand go into the sprocket... Something to think about!

Personally, I'm more prone to ADD a chain guard to a bike then remove one! ๐Ÿ˜

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I'd put it back on. I know a guy that's missing part of two fingers because they got into the rear sprocket. About half the index finger and about a quarter of the middle finger is gone. Left the pieces laying on the track, there wasn't anything left worth picking up.

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You are joking right?? The chain guard protects your sprocket, It does keep your chain from derailing, and will help keep things out [ like your hands]. It's not on there for the looks. Your bike came with a decent chain guard that actually works. Not all trail bikes do. Why would you take it off in the first place? LIKE THE MAN SAID , MOST PUT THEM ON, NOT TAKE THEM OFF.๐Ÿ˜

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You are joking right?? The chain guard protects your sprocket, It does keep your chain from derailing, and will help keep things out [ like your hands]. It's not on there for the looks. Your bike came with a decent chain guard that actually works. Not all trail bikes do. Why would you take it off in the first place? LIKE THE MAN SAID , MOST PUT THEM ON, NOT TAKE THEM OFF.๐Ÿ˜

it protects the sproket and your fingers and thats it!!!....it does not affect the chain at all!!!

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it protects the sproket and your fingers and thats it!!!....it does not affect the chain at all!!!

Not trying to get into a big debate here . Feel free to believe what you want , that's cool. But if you have only ridden bikes with modern chain guides installed , how would you know? And if you ride without one and never had a derailment , I want you to pick my next lottery numbers.....The the mylar inserts within the chain guides are just wider than the chain to guide the chain on to the sprockets hint [chain guide]. It also protects your limbs and the sprocket. For those who have ridden when trail bikes didn't have real chain guides just a fin to keep the sprockets from getting bent , or , some of the TTR owners who's bikes still don't come with them, and after several chain derailments , buy BBR guides......They know what im talking about. Chain derailment was always an issue. Even a well adjusted chain on a bike with 9'' of travel wil tighten and loosen as the travel goes up and down. At some point , it will be loose enough to jump. Usually at the top of the travel. A stick or log sticking up enough to knock your chain to one side or the other can make it jump if the travel is in the right place when it happens. Wont happen with a modern c/g.unless the chain breaks. You may ride 3 times with no problem , then 15 miles from camp , find yourself trying to put it back on [ that is, if you didn't break cases when it came off. ]

Edited by john4ct
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Not trying to get into a big debate here . Feel free to believe what you want , that's cool. But if you have only ridden bikes with modern chain guides installed , how would you know? And if you ride without one and never had a derailment , I want you to pick my next lottery numbers.....The the mylar inserts within the chain guides are just wider than the chain to guide the chain on to the sprockets hint [chain guide]. It also protects your limbs and the sprocket. For those who have ridden when trail bikes didn't have real chain guides just a fin to keep the sprockets from getting bent , or , some of the TTR owners who's bikes still don't come with them, and after several chain derailments , buy BBR guides......They know what im talking about. Chain derailment was always an issue. Even a well adjusted chain on a bike with 9'' of travel wil tighten and loosen as the travel goes up and down. At some point , it will be loose enough to jump. Usually at the top of the travel. A stick or log sticking up enough to knock your chain to one side or the other can make it jump if the travel is in the right place when it happens. Wont happen with a modern c/g.unless the chain breaks. You may ride 3 times with no problem , then 15 miles from camp , find yourself trying to put it back on [ that is, if you didn't break cases when it came off. ]

can anybody tell me if it is ok to leave off?...and if he is right or wrong?....and will it derail without the chain guard?...please i need to know...i have a 2006 honda crf150f

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right? wrong? I don't know but my kid's CRF70 had the chain jump the sprocket and put a hole in the left side cover, even though the chain was adjusted correctly. Then I noticed it was missing the chain guide. Did the missing chain guard contribute to the derailment? i'm no expert but I ordered a new chain guide. No one I know runs without a lower chain guide.

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can anybody tell me if it is ok to leave off?...and if he is right or wrong?....and will it derail without the chain guard?...please i need to know...i have a 2006 honda crf150f

why do you want to take it off? isn't it a clue that every dirt bike made has a chain guide installed from the factory?

btw, he's right. ๐Ÿ˜

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I've said this before: The only time I've had the chain derail on my CRF230F is when the chain guard would hit on something and bend.

I had to remove it from the bike months ago due to a hard rock hit, and I have not purchased another. I have had no problems without it.

I grew up riding in the '70's, and none of my bikes forever had a chain guide, and personally I don't know and have never met anyone who said they lost a digit in the chain.

My KTM required one due to swingarm geometry, but this CRF230F does not seem to care.

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I've said this before: The only time I've had the chain derail on my CRF230F is when the chain guard would hit on something and bend.

I had to remove it from the bike months ago due to a hard rock hit, and I have not purchased another. I have had no problems without it.

I grew up riding in the '70's, and none of my bikes forever had a chain guide, and personally I don't know and have never met anyone who said they lost a digit in the chain.

My KTM required one due to swingarm geometry, but this CRF230F does not seem to care.

So I will be ok without it?...just want to make sure It hurt anything without it

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So I will be ok without it?...just want to make sure It hurt anything without it

You will have to make your own conclusions, based on the information you currently have available.

I have no worries about not running one on the CRF230F.

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I've said this before: The only time I've had the chain derail on my CRF230F is when the chain guard would hit on something and bend.

I had to remove it from the bike months ago due to a hard rock hit, and I have not purchased another. I have had no problems without it.

I grew up riding in the '70's, and none of my bikes forever had a chain guide, and personally I don't know and have never met anyone who said they lost a digit in the chain.

My KTM required one due to swingarm geometry, but this CRF230F does not seem to care.

When you bent the guide , possibly it saved your sprocket. even though it would cause the chain to come off.Nothing will give you 100% PROTECTION from a crash or rocks . A better question would be: Are you better off without one? For whatever the reason. HONDA seems to think not.

Just because you haven't had any problems yet, doesn't mean you won't. iT IS POSSIBLE THAT YOU MIGHT NOT. But are you better off without it ? would you have taken it off if you hadn't had to because of damage?

I too have been riding since the 70's. Built many bikes old and new. Trail bikes, mx bikes , restored vintage MXERS. And modified 2 150f's [ like many others on here}which i still have and ride. Not a real fair comparison between those bikes and the newer ones including the crf. Twin shocks 3 1/2 inches of travel in the rear and a different frame and swing arm geometry on older bikes. You could snug the chain up and it would stay that way throughout the travel. Mostly because they didn't have much travel. The chains did come off once in a while but for the most part , they stayed on pretty well.That was then. chain guards became standard equipment when monoshocks became popular, swing arms became longer ,and bikes started having 8-12'' of travel making it virtually impossible to keep proper tension on the chain throughout the entire travel. DOES this mean you can't ride without one? NO. you may ride for a while without any problems but the guide decreases the chance of having chain related problems by a lot on modern bikes in my view. I've leaned most things the hard way and try to keep others from having to do the same. But like you said, YOU HAVE TO MAKE YOUR OWN CHOICE BASED ON WHAT YOU BELIEVE. I haven't had a wreck that would have caused a head injury in a while, but I still wear a helmet .It's just common sense. ๐Ÿ˜

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I would just keep it on.

You are constantly asking if you can take this and that off of your bike. Just leave the stock crap on the bike and be done. Unless you are taking off the baffle and snorkel:smirk:

Must be a really young guy with a new bike. It's all good. He will figure it out eventually .

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When you bent the guide , possibly it saved your sprocket. even though it would cause the chain to come off.Nothing will give you 100% PROTECTION from a crash or rocks . A better question would be: Are you better off without one? For whatever the reason. HONDA seems to think not.

Just because you haven't had any problems yet, doesn't mean you won't. iT IS POSSIBLE THAT YOU MIGHT NOT. But are you better off without it ? would you have taken it off if you hadn't had to because of damage?

I too have been riding since the 70's. Built many bikes old and new. Trail bikes, mx bikes , restored vintage MXERS. And modified 2 150f's [ like many others on here}which i still have and ride. Not a real fair comparison between those bikes and the newer ones including the crf. Twin shocks 3 1/2 inches of travel in the rear and a different frame and swing arm geometry on older bikes. You could snug the chain up and it would stay that way throughout the travel. Mostly because they didn't have much travel. The chains did come off once in a while but for the most part , they stayed on pretty well.That was then. chain guards became standard equipment when monoshocks became popular, swing arms became longer ,and bikes started having 8-12'' of travel making it virtually impossible to keep proper tension on the chain throughout the entire travel. DOES this mean you can't ride without one? NO. you may ride for a while without any problems but the guide decreases the chance of having chain related problems by a lot on modern bikes in my view. I've leaned most things the hard way and try to keep others from having to do the same. But like you said, YOU HAVE TO MAKE YOUR OWN CHOICE BASED ON WHAT YOU BELIEVE. I haven't had a wreck that would have caused a head injury in a while, but I still wear a helmet .It's just common sense. ๐Ÿ˜

Again, the only time my chain has come off is when the chain guide was bent. I've never been down with a bent sprocket, but I've been down on the trail many times with bent and broken chain guides.

I had forgotten, but 5-6 years ago my son was on a CRF150, and we had to fix the chain guide on that thing quite a few times also.

I used to lose chains quite frequently on the old bikes, but it was always due to worn chains, sprockets with teeth that looked like throwing star spikes, etc.

Comparing a helmet to a chain guide is just plain ridiculous in my opinion.

Just for the fun of it, I'll post back in a few months and again in another few months, and so on. It should be interesting.

....and Honda also builds the bike with jetting that is too lean, exhaust that is too restrictive, air filter boxes that are choked down, push and pull throttle cables, and I could go on. They have lawers telling them what to install, bean-counters telling them to cut costs, and a group of engineers designing the bikes to be idiot proof.

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Must be a really young guy with a new bike. It's all good. He will figure it out eventually .

I'm 43, been riding since I was 8ish, and I just pulled 45lbs worth of stuff off of my bike. I'm not so sure it's age related. ๐Ÿ˜

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Must be a really young guy with a new bike. It's all good. He will figure it out eventually .

I was like that at one point. Then i just started ripping my bike apart and trying to put it back together. I learned a lot so far.

I'm 43, been riding since I was 8ish, and I just pulled 45lbs worth of stuff off of my bike. I'm not so sure it's age related. ๐Ÿ˜

45lbs is insane and I still dont believe thats possible. Everytime I see your thread, I look at my bike and scratch my head:smirk:.

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I was like that at one point. Then i just started ripping my bike apart and trying to put it back together. I learned a lot so far.

45lbs is insane and I still dont believe thats possible. Everytime I see your thread, I look at my bike and scratch my head:smirk:.

I still haven't weighed the bike since the chain guide got ripped off. It might be 46lbs.

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