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How to clean oily brake pads


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Hey fellas,

Can anyone shed a little light on this one. Following a little fork seal altercation I've ended up with a fairly oily set of front brake pads.

Wouldn't normally bother me, but seeing as the pads are basically brand new, it'd be nice to use them a little longer.

What are your tips and tricks for de-oiling them?

I have heard of soaking them in fuel overnight and then setting them on fire, in order to draw the oil out. Anyone tried this with any luck?

The pads concerned are standard issue Honda MX pads.

Cheers,

Berg

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When I worked in a truck shop we used to "save" brake shoes by heating them with a small propane torch, wait for the oil to surface, then rinse with brake clean. Do that a few times and you should be good to go.

That's exactly what I was about to reccomend. Take a propane torch to em, it's what we always did at the bicycle shop I worked at

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Brake pads are pretty cheap and kinda important. Its happened to all of us, toss them. I have bought cheap pads off ebay that worked fine, much better than oil soaked. Its just not worth the hassle unless you have some exotic something that parts won't cross.

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Brake pads are pretty cheap and kinda important. Its happened to all of us, toss them. I have bought cheap pads off ebay that worked fine, much better than oil soaked. Its just not worth the hassle unless you have some exotic something that parts won't cross.

Agreed but sometimes you need a home remedy to get out for a ride or 2 before the new pads come in. I know here our dealer doesn't stock anything when it comes to parts and it takes a week for them to get anything so you can either not ride for a week or break out the blow torch.

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Agreed but sometimes you need a home remedy to get out for a ride or 2 before the new pads come in. I know here our dealer doesn't stock anything when it comes to parts and it takes a week for them to get anything so you can either not ride for a week or break out the blow torch.

Rule #2 is always have brake pads for you bike hanging on your wall! Saves a lot of ­čśĆ I bet there is a half dozen pair easy on my wall, along with wheel bearings, tubes, and a half dozen tires for most of my bikes. I stock more than the local dealer. If nothing else, change your pads before they are totally gone and save them for a rainy day.

I have a Triumph Tiger and a couple of Gasgas, so parts aren't at every corner, but one sweet thing is my GG brakes are the same as my XR650R and the front of my sons CRF230! That reminds me, I think I used both sets of my rear Nissin brakes, may need to order more.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks for the tips fellas!

I hit both pads with the oxyacetylene set, didn't let them get too hot though. Within seconds they started hissing and bubbling away.

Repeated the procedure, installed them again and went riding.

Verdict:- They're as good as new. Certainly wouldn't pick that they'd been drenched in fork oil. One finger stoppies, here we come!

Thanks again guys

Berg

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