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do you hone everytime you rebuild


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As i was taking apart my motor i noticed my piston ring is worn down on the exaust side, i will be replacing it. Is this bad that my ring isent wearing evenly? the rest of the ring has pleny of wear left on it but the exaust port side is almost gone?

I recently had my cylinder honed with my last rebuild, i checked the bore and it looks good, a few scratches, nothing big. still has a crisscross too. Should i have it touched up though sence im replacing the ring? I dont want to mess up the tolorences.

Oh ya and how do i know if i need a new piston?

thanks.

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A plated cylinder doesn't need to be honed for a new ring, but it does need to be deglazed, which doesn't grind away any of the plating.

Worn out rings typically leave the black "blow-by" stains on the piston at various places--so it's not unusual for the rings to wear more in some places than in others. However, I'd put a micrometer on the cylinder when you have the head off and make sure it is still round. A micrometer and the service manual will also tell you if the piston is still serviceable.

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+1 as stated above the cylinder doesnt need honed unless its being replated. It does need to be deglazed though, this can be achieved by using an sos pad.

The piston ring wear is normal, I usually replace rings halfway through the life of the piston which on my 125 is 10hrs and on the 250s is 30 hrs of hard racing. So I swap rings at 5 and 15 hrs. As far as the piston goes, the easiest way to know piston life is to get an hour meter and monitor how many hours you put on the bike. I switch pistons quite often because I rev the piss out of my bikes and my pistons see some serious abuse. You may not need to change your pistons quite as often depending on your riding style. My friends change theyre pistons at 20hr on a 125 and 50hrs on a 250 because they dont ride theyre bikes nearly as hard as I do. This is all personal pref. but going beyond that may be asking for trouble as pistons tend to get brittle after givin # of hours and are more prone to the skirts breaking off esp on a cast piston. The forged pistons (which I run) are less prone to the skirts shattering but it can still happen.

That is my .02 so I hope that helps

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I basically just use an sos pad and soapy water and scrub the cylinder walls to break up all the glazing which fills in the cross hatching and prevents good oil retention... honing is what actually forms the cross hatching pattern you see in your cylinder. Its not a good idea to hone a cylinder unless you really know what your doing or you can catch and damage the ports with the ball hone... I have heard the brush hones work well on the 2 strokes however...

The glaze is basically all the material that will create a smooth coating/ glaze over the cylinder which makes the cross hatching almost non existant which also mean poor oil retention, ring seating, and can effect compression.

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