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Question for those who have racks, home built or purchased.


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In preparing to build a rack, I'm wondering what to do at the point where it mounts to the sides of the seat (one bolt/side). I can see that the racks you can buy just use a different/longer bolt that replaces the stock bolts. However, is that mounting method just pipe with a piece welded (a washer perhaps) to the back side that these longer bolts go through? Has anyone used solid round stock here and simply drilled all the way through and used a button head bolt to attach the rack to the seat mounts? Hope I'm making some sort of sense here.....

Pics would be great if anyone has some.

Thanks.

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In preparing to build a rack, I'm wondering what to do at the point where it mounts to the sides of the seat (one bolt/side). I can see that the racks you can buy just use a different/longer bolt that replaces the stock bolts. However, is that mounting method just pipe with a piece welded (a washer perhaps) to the back side that these longer bolts go through? Has anyone used solid round stock here and simply drilled all the way through and used a button head bolt to attach the rack to the seat mounts? Hope I'm making some sort of sense here.....

Pics would be great if anyone has some.

Thanks.

I have the suzuki rack.

the seat mount part isnt solid but it appears to be thicker than a washer..maybe like two washers but not really any thicker than that

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The only problem that I encountered with using a long piece of tube as opposed to a short tube and a spacer, is that I have to pry the legs of the rack apart in order to get the rack on or off with the seat installed. I couldn't figure out how to get the seat off without mutilating the plastics to get to the strap that runs over the seat. Maybe people just leave that off? ๐Ÿ˜

My rack:

rack3__medium__215.jpg

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Cuchara,

Thanks for the info! I think that's what I'll do too.

Arya,

Great looking rack! It's very similar to what I was thinking too. Is it 3/4" tubing?

Anyway, thanks for the info and posting the pic. If you have time and want, I'd love to see more pics from different angles.

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It's actually 1" tubing as it was what I had on hand. It's overbuilt, but it was "free"

I just happen to have some other pics from when I was building it. ๐Ÿ˜

Oh, and it has been tested. Did 475 miles of FS roads and trails with about 50lbs of gear and it worked just fine(including 3 falls ๐Ÿ˜ )

rack__medium__901.jpg

rack4__medium__141.jpg

rack6__medium__540.jpg

rack1__medium__177.jpg

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It's actually 1" tubing as it was what I had on hand. It's overbuilt, but it was "free"

I just happen to have some other pics from when I was building it. ๐Ÿ˜

Oh, and it has been tested. Did 475 miles of FS roads and trails with about 50lbs of gear and it worked just fine(including 3 falls ๐Ÿ˜ )

I had thought 1" would be too big but it actually looks really good. It's a nice, simple and clean design too. Thanks for posting the pics.

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A friend and I bodged this up in a couple of hours recently. The top of the rack is 12" long by 10" wide, outside dimensions. Made from 1/2" square steel tubing. The brackets on the fender and side mounts are just 1" pieces cut off a chunk of 1" angle. Our goal was to keep it all simple: simple to fit, simple to fab and simple to install/remove.

The tubing was hand bent (a 1ยฝ" radius bender in the bench vice and lots of grunting) and welded with a little 110V MIG wire welder.

The top brackets are positioned to use the existing captive nuts for the toolkit mount. Those side mount rails attach at the top end to the crossbar, not to the outside rail. We did that to minimize the bends. We just took a straight shot back and up from the bolt holes on the rear frame assembly to the cross rail on the rack.

You will notice that we avoided using the seat mounts. Too many issues for design, fab and usage. In particular, I do not want to be messing with the rack mounts every time I want to take the seat off for any reason. The seat nicely clears the front of the rack .. a design consideration worth paying attention to. ๐Ÿ˜

It's solid as a rock with this mounting method. We can lift the back of the bike off the ground using just the rack. It's been on the bike for about 1,500km now, mostly over gravel roads. I haven't had any heavy weight on it but it's sure solid enough to handle anything I'm ever likely to strap onto it.

It's finished with three spray coats of roll bar/chassis paint. It's a fast drying epoxy that is as easy to use as acrylic lacquer .. two light coats and one wet coat .. minimum of ten minutes between coats and all three in under an hour.

We're going to do one modification. It really needs some bungee cord hooks on the underside to make it totally useful.

Here's the link to the album if you want to see a bit more detail. Holler if you need a different angle.

Thanks for looking.

...ken...

IMG_1344.jpg

Edited by Ken in Regina
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Here's the thread on my build if it'll help.

https://thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=480851&highlight=

This past spring I modified this to eliminate the lower support legs, as I had to remove everything everytime I needed to take off one of the side panels. Not fun. I used the same subframe mounting points as in this build, but ran a piece of aluminum between the two lower mounts, up and over just beneath the rear fender. I then welded a couple of mounts to the cross bar of this rack and drilled two holes down through these new mounts, through the fender and through the aluminum. A couple of bolts fastened everything together and now I only have to loosed these two bolts and the seat mount bolts to get to anything I need. I don't have any pics of this modification so I hope the description is adequate and not confusing.

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A friend and I bodged this up in a couple of hours recently. The top of the rack is 12" long by 10" wide, outside dimensions. Made from 1/2" square steel tubing. The brackets on the fender and side mounts are just 1" pieces cut off a chunk of 1" angle. Our goal was to keep it all simple: simple to fit, simple to fab and simple to install/remove.

...ken...

Thanks for the info and explanation. Good looking rack you made.

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Here's the thread on my build if it'll help.

https://thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=480851&highlight=

This past spring I modified this to eliminate the lower support legs, as I had to remove everything everytime I needed to take off one of the side panels. Not fun. I used the same subframe mounting points as in this build, but ran a piece of aluminum between the two lower mounts, up and over just beneath the rear fender. I then welded a couple of mounts to the cross bar of this rack and drilled two holes down through these new mounts, through the fender and through the aluminum. A couple of bolts fastened everything together and now I only have to loosed these two bolts and the seat mount bolts to get to anything I need. I don't have any pics of this modification so I hope the description is adequate and not confusing.

Cuchara,

Yes, that makes sense.

Superb write-up you did w/ pics and clear explanations. Thanks for taking the time to do that! Very nice rack. You and I also share the same philosophy when it comes to building things.

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Cuchara,

Yes, that makes sense.

Superb write-up you did w/ pics and clear explanations. Thanks for taking the time to do that! Very nice rack. You and I also share the same philosophy when it comes to building things.

That was a good write-up. We took the same approach on my build. First we cut out a piece of cardboard at 10"x12" and laid it on the rear fender to see if it was really a good size as it sounded. When we liked what we saw we cut and bent the outer rail of the rack and set it on the rear without welding the ends.

We still liked it so we tacked the ends together to close the loop.

We laid it on the fender again and eyeballed potential mounting points. We first thought about going the route that Cuchara Red did with those tubes. But we decided that had too many issues with lining things up .. more bending and such than we cared to do. We decided the mounting holes for the toolkit were just too good a mounting point to ignore. We would use them, regardless what other mounting points we chose.

When we had the outer rail positioned on the fender we saw that putting three crossrails, like Cuchara Red's, would position the front rail perfectly for the upper mounting tabs. So we cut and tacked the crossrails in, laid the rack on the fender, positioned and marked the mounting tabs and cut and tacked them.

Once we had that all sorted, we bolted the rack to the top mounts and stood back to consider the lower mounts one last time.

We figured it was just a bunch easier to take a straight shot to the holes in the subframe under the fender at the back of the side panels rather than trying to get to the seat bolts (which I didn't want anything to do with anyway). So we cut two more tabs from the angle iron, drilled and bolted them to the chosen mounting points under the fender and figured out what length and bend we needed to get the side braces from the underside of the rack to the tabs.

That last exercise took a bit of fiddling to get the length and bends of the two braces right. But it was just fiddling, not rocket science. Would have been quicker if both of us weren't so picky. Everything to that point had been quite simple and straightforward.

With everything all tacked together, my friend finished the welds except for the welds for those two side braces. We wanted one last crack at any minor repositioning that might be needed after the welding of the rest of the rack. It did need a tiny bit of twisting before finishing those welds (but only because it was a pair of perfectionists in the room ๐Ÿ˜ ).

Fortunately neither of us works much from detailed plans. It's easier and more fun to scribble a bit on a piece of paper, make cardboard cutouts for rough fit and then take it a stage at a time, making modifications to the "design" as you go. Sort of design-on-the-fly.

Glad to hear we're not the only ones who work that way. ๐Ÿ˜

...ken...

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